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Worth H. Hester

Bio: Worth H. Hester is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Law enforcement & Service (business). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 6 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: One area in which the National Park Service has had to assume a major new role is in law enforcement as discussed by the authors, and the work in this paper is an example of such an area.
Abstract: The duties of the National Park Service have grown dramatically since its creation in 1916. One area in which the Park Service has had to assume a major new role is in law enforcement. This paper a...

6 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identify and describe factors associated with job satisfaction among conservation officers, such as enjoyment of the outdoors, independence, job diversity/variety, and meeting people.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this research was to identify and describe factors associated with job satisfaction among conservation officers.Design/methodology/approach – The study took a qualitative approach to data collection that included a survey and 24 in‐depth interviews with Kentucky conservation officers. Data were examined with the intention of identifying common themes.Findings – Four categories associated with job satisfaction were identified: enjoyment of the outdoors, independence, job diversity/variety, and meeting people. The majority of conservation officers found their work very satisfying.Research limitations/implications – The results are not generalizable, given the qualitative nature of the research. To allow the generalizability of findings, future research should include quantitative measures that could specify how additional factors are related to job satisfaction among conservation officers, such as age, years of service, rank, and education. Future studies should also examine job sat...

55 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a field study of crime and enforcement in forests and national parks was conducted over a 24-month period in western USA, where the authors interviewed Forest Service Law Enforcement Officers (LEO) about their career history, the enforcement system and related issues, notably weapons events.
Abstract: Reports from within a larger study of crime and enforcement in forests and parks, this field study having taken place in western USA over a 24‐month period. Interviews Forest Service Law Enforcement Officers (LEOs) about their career history, the enforcement system and related issues ‐ notably weapons events. Finds that LEOs are not heavy‐handed and that the types of crime encountered give valid reasons for their carriage of firearms.

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a qualitative investigation of law enforcement rangers' roles, responsibilities, and patrol operations in a protected area in Uganda is presented, based on interviews and participant observation.
Abstract: Research examining wildlife law enforcement has steadily grown within recent years. Few studies, however, are based outside of the United States. Furthermore, studies that have examined wildlife law enforcement in other settings, including African countries, have primarily focused on quantifying the effectiveness of patrol activities, but little is known about actual patrol activities. Based on interviews and participant observation, this research attempts to contribute to both the criminal justice and conservation science literature by providing an in-depth qualitative investigation of law enforcement rangers’ roles, responsibilities, and patrol operations in a protected area in Uganda.

29 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Despite a recent surge of visitation and frequent media accounts of lawlessness in America's national parks, little empirical research has been dedicated to crime and law enforcement in the U.S. national parks as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Despite a recent surge of visitation and frequent media accounts of lawlessness in America’s national parks, little empirical research has been dedicated to crime and law enforcement in the U.S. na...

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors reviewed these proposals and suggested that in the long run removal from the Department of the Interior will not solve the problems of the National Park Service and may well accelerate them.
Abstract: Over the course of the last two decades there has been a recurring theme among proponents of the National Park Service mission that politics has undermined the day-to-day goals of the Service. With the increased politization of the Park Service, two recent proposals have called for removal of the NPS from the Department of the Interior and call for it to become an independent body along the lines of other government entities such as the Smithsonian Institution. This article reviews these proposals and suggests that in the long run removal from the Department of the Interior will not solve the problems of the NPS and may well accelerate them.

1 citations