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Yanjun Li

Bio: Yanjun Li is an academic researcher from Case Western Reserve University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Flame spread & Combustion. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 8 publications receiving 20 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors performed microgravity experiments to study concurrent-flow flame spread over an array of thin cellulose-based fuel samples, using NASA Glenn Research Center's 5.18-s drop tower.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the same authors conducted concurrent flow flame spread experiments over thermally thin solid fuels in microgravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS) under varying levels of confinement.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a three-dimensional transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combustion model is used to simulate concurrent-flow flame spread over a thin solid sample in a narrow flow duct.
Abstract: The objective of this work is to investigate the aerodynamics and thermal interactions between a spreading flame and the surrounding walls as well as their effects on fire behaviors. A three-dimensional transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combustion model is used to simulate concurrent-flow flame spread over a thin solid sample in a narrow flow duct. The height of the flow duct is the main parameter. The numerical results predict a quenching height for the flow duct below which the flame fails to spread. For duct heights sufficiently larger than the quenching height, the flame reaches a steady spreading state before the sample is fully consumed. The flame spread rate and the pyrolysis length at steady-state first increase and then decrease when the flow duct height decreases. The detailed gas and solid profiles show that flow confinement has multiple effects on the flame spread process. On one hand, it accelerates flow during thermal expansion from combustion, intensifying the flame. On the other hand, increasing flow confinement reduces the oxygen supply to the flame and increases conductive heat loss to the walls, both of which weaken the flame. These competing effects result in the aforementioned nonmonotonic trend of flame spread rate as duct height varies. Near the quenching duct height, the transient model reveals that the flame exhibits oscillation in length, flame temperature, and flame structure. This phenomenon is suspected to be due to thermodiffusive instability.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a novel strategy was explored by supplying nutrition enriched with silicon source, which showed that Si enrichment improved the thermal stability of fungi fiber, possibly due to the thermally stable Si being utilized for fungi cell wall construction.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and microscale combus... is applied to NOMEX fabric for fire safety and military applications for its advantages in thermal and chemical resistance.
Abstract: NOMEX® fabric is widely used in fire safety and military applications for its advantages in thermal and chemical resistance. In this research, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and microscale combus...

4 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used low-cost and research-grade gas and particle sensors to detect and characterize emissions from laboratory smoldering and flaming tests of three spacecraft-relevant materials.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors present scientifically verified guiding principles for choosing a fungus species to obtain the desired effect, based on analyses of scientific articles concerning MBCs, mycological literature, and patent documents.
Abstract: Mycelium-Based Composites (MBCs) are innovative engineering materials made from lignocellulosic by-products bonded with fungal mycelium. While some performance characteristics of MBCs are inferior to those of currently used engineering materials, these composites nevertheless prove to be superior in ecological aspects. Improving the properties of MBCs may be achieved using an adequate substrate type, fungus species, and manufacturing technology. This article presents scientifically verified guiding principles for choosing a fungus species to obtain the desired effect. This aim was realized based on analyses of scientific articles concerning MBCs, mycological literature, and patent documents. Based on these analyses, over 70 fungi species used to manufacture MBC have been identified and the most commonly used combinations of fungi species-substrate-manufacturing technology are presented. The main result of this review was to demonstrate the characteristics of the fungi considered optimal in terms of the resulting engineering material properties. Thus, a list of the 11 main fungus characteristics that increase the effectiveness in the engineering material formation include: rapid hyphae growth, high virulence, dimitic or trimitic hyphal system, white rot decay type, high versatility in nutrition, high tolerance to a substrate, environmental parameters, susceptibility to readily controlled factors, easy to deactivate, saprophytic, non-mycotoxic, and capability to biosynthesize natural active substances. An additional analysis result is a list of the names of fungus species, the types of substrates used, the applications of the material produced, and the main findings reported in the scientific literature.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a novel naturally grown mycelium-composite insulation brick was bio-produced by cultivating a biocompatible and fast-growing fungus, Pleurotus ostreatus, in the rye berries feedstocks.

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors performed microgravity experiments to study concurrent-flow flame spread over an array of thin cellulose-based fuel samples, using NASA Glenn Research Center's 5.18-s drop tower.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the same authors conducted concurrent flow flame spread experiments over thermally thin solid fuels in microgravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS) under varying levels of confinement.

10 citations