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Yasuhiko Iwasaki

Bio: Yasuhiko Iwasaki is an academic researcher from Kansai University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Surface modification & Polymer. The author has an hindex of 50, co-authored 221 publications receiving 9104 citations. Previous affiliations of Yasuhiko Iwasaki include University of California, San Francisco & Tokyo Medical and Dental University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that fewer proteins are adsorbed and their original conformation is not changed on polymer surfaces that possess a high free water fraction.
Abstract: The amount of plasma protein adsorbed on a phospholipid polymer having a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) moiety was reduced compared to the amount of protein adsorbed onto poly[2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)], poly[n-butyl methacrylate (BMA)], and BMA copolymers with acrylamide (AAm) or N-vinyl pyrrolidone (VPy) moieties having a hydrophilic fraction. To clarify the reason for the reduced protein adsorption on the MPC polymer, the water structure in the hydrated polymer was examined with attention to the free water fraction. Hydration of the polymers occurred when they were immersed in water. The differential scanning calorimetric analysis of these hydrated polymers revealed that the free water fractions in the poly(MPC-co-BMA) and poly(MPC-co-n-dodecyl methacrylate) with a 0.30 MPC mole fraction were above 0.70. On the other hand, the free water fractions in the poly(HEMA), poly(AAm-co-BMA), and poly(VPy-co-BMA) were below 0.42. The conformational change in proteins adsorbed on the MPC polymers and poly(HEMA) were determined using ultraviolet and circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements. Proteins adsorbed on poly(HEMA) changed considerably, but those adsorbed on poly(MPC-co-BMA) with a 0.30 MPC mole fraction differed little from the native state. We concluded from these results that fewer proteins are adsorbed and their original conformation is not changed on polymer surfaces that possess a high free water fraction.

950 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using a non-heat-generating, electrostatically driven inkjet system, living cells were safely ejected onto culture disks and has the potential to advance the field of tissue engineering.
Abstract: Inkjet printers are capable of printing at high resolution by ejecting extremely small ink drops. Established printing technology will be able to seed living cells, at micrometer resolution, in arrangements similar to biological tissues. We describe the use of a biocompatible inkjet head and our investigation of the feasibility of microseeding with living cells. Living cells are easily damaged by heat; therefore, we used an electrostatically driven inkjet system that was able to eject ink without generating significant heat. Bovine vascular endothelial cells were prepared and suspended in culture medium, and the cell suspension was used as "ink" and ejected onto culture disks. Microscopic observation showed that the endothelial cells were situated in the ejected dots in the medium, and that the number of cells in each dot was dependent on the concentration of the cell suspension and ejection frequency chosen. After the ejected cells were incubated for a few hours, they adhered to the culture disks. Using our non-heat-generating, electrostatically driven inkjet system, living cells were safely ejected onto culture disks. This microseeding technique with living cells has the potential to advance the field of tissue engineering.

520 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Fundamental aspects of cell membrane-inspired phospholipid polymers and their usefulness in the development of medical devices and their use in biointerfaces between artificial and biological systems are described.

299 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: To better understand protein/material and cell/material interactions at the submolecular level, well-defined polymer brushes consisting of poly(2-methacryloyloy loxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) on silicon wafers were prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP).

274 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation and developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology.
Abstract: Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology.

4,841 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Jan 2016-Nature
TL;DR: This work bridges the technological gap between signal transduction, conditioning, processing and wireless transmission in wearable biosensors by merging plastic-based sensors that interface with the skin with silicon integrated circuits consolidated on a flexible circuit board for complex signal processing.
Abstract: Wearable sensor technologies are essential to the realization of personalized medicine through continuously monitoring an individual's state of health. Sampling human sweat, which is rich in physiological information, could enable non-invasive monitoring. Previously reported sweat-based and other non-invasive biosensors either can only monitor a single analyte at a time or lack on-site signal processing circuitry and sensor calibration mechanisms for accurate analysis of the physiological state. Given the complexity of sweat secretion, simultaneous and multiplexed screening of target biomarkers is critical and requires full system integration to ensure the accuracy of measurements. Here we present a mechanically flexible and fully integrated (that is, no external analysis is needed) sensor array for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis, which simultaneously and selectively measures sweat metabolites (such as glucose and lactate) and electrolytes (such as sodium and potassium ions), as well as the skin temperature (to calibrate the response of the sensors). Our work bridges the technological gap between signal transduction, conditioning (amplification and filtering), processing and wireless transmission in wearable biosensors by merging plastic-based sensors that interface with the skin with silicon integrated circuits consolidated on a flexible circuit board for complex signal processing. This application could not have been realized using either of these technologies alone owing to their respective inherent limitations. The wearable system is used to measure the detailed sweat profile of human subjects engaged in prolonged indoor and outdoor physical activities, and to make a real-time assessment of the physiological state of the subjects. This platform enables a wide range of personalized diagnostic and physiological monitoring applications.

3,235 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of surface modification techniques for titanium and titanium alloys can be found in this article, where the authors have shown that the wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and biological properties can be improved selectively using the appropriate surface treatment techniques while the desirable bulk attributes of the materials are retained.
Abstract: Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, in order to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. This article reviews the various surface modification technologies pertaining to titanium and titanium alloys including mechanical treatment, thermal spraying, sol–gel, chemical and electrochemical treatment, and ion implantation from the perspective of biomedical engineering. Recent work has shown that the wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and biological properties of titanium and titanium alloys can be improved selectively using the appropriate surface treatment techniques while the desirable bulk attributes of the materials are retained. The proper surface treatment expands the use of titanium and titanium alloys in the biomedical fields. Some of the recent applications are also discussed in this paper.

3,019 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The major strategies for designing surfaces that prevent fouling due to proteins, bacteria, and marine organisms are reviewed and ongoing research in this area should result in the development of even better antifouling materials in the future.
Abstract: The major strategies for designing surfaces that prevent fouling due to proteins, bacteria, and marine organisms are reviewed. Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from biosensors to biomedical implants and devices, and from food packaging to industrial and marine equipment. The two major approaches to combat surface fouling are based on either preventing biofoulants from attaching or degrading them. One of the key strategies for imparting adhesion resistance involves the functionalization of surfaces with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) or oligo(ethylene glycol). Several alternatives to PEG-based coatings have also been designed over the past decade. While protein-resistant coatings may also resist bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation, in order to overcome the fouling-mediated risk of bacterial infection it is highly desirable to design coatings that are bactericidal. Traditional techniques involve the design of coatings that release biocidal agents, including antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts (QAS), and silver, into the surrounding aqueous environment. However, the emergence of antibiotic- and silver-resistant pathogenic strains has necessitated the development of alternative strategies. Therefore, other techniques based on the use of polycations, enzymes, nanomaterials, and photoactive agents are being investigated. With regard to marine antifouling coatings, restrictions on the use of biocide-releasing coatings have made the generation of nontoxic antifouling surfaces more important. While considerable progress has been made in the design of antifouling coatings, ongoing research in this area should result in the development of even better antifouling materials in the future.

2,278 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review summarizes the major progress in the field, including the principles that permit atomically precise synthesis, new types of atomic structures, and unique physical and chemical properties ofatomically precise nanoparticles, as well as exciting opportunities for nanochemists to understand very fundamental science of colloidal nanoparticles.
Abstract: Colloidal nanoparticles are being intensely pursued in current nanoscience research. Nanochemists are often frustrated by the well-known fact that no two nanoparticles are the same, which precludes the deep understanding of many fundamental properties of colloidal nanoparticles in which the total structures (core plus surface) must be known. Therefore, controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision and solving their total structures have long been major dreams for nanochemists. Recently, these goals are partially fulfilled in the case of gold nanoparticles, at least in the ultrasmall size regime (1–3 nm in diameter, often called nanoclusters). This review summarizes the major progress in the field, including the principles that permit atomically precise synthesis, new types of atomic structures, and unique physical and chemical properties of atomically precise nanoparticles, as well as exciting opportunities for nanochemists to understand very fundamental science of colloidal nanoparticles (such as the s...

2,144 citations