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Yehuda Bauer

Bio: Yehuda Bauer is an academic researcher from Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & Genocide. The author has an hindex of 14, co-authored 37 publications receiving 729 citations.

Papers
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Book
11 Dec 2000
TL;DR: A study of the Holocaust, evaluating accepted views of its history and meaning, is presented in this paper, where the authors present opinions on topics ranging from how Jews reacted to the murderous campaign against them to the relationship between the Holocaust and the establishment of Israel.
Abstract: A study of the Holocaust, evaluating accepted views of its history and meaning. Yehuda Bauer offers his own interpretation of why the Holocaust occurred and how another can be prevented. He presents opinions on topics ranging from how Jews reacted to the murderous campaign against them to the relationship between the Holocaust and the establishment of Israel.

198 citations

Book
01 Jun 1982

88 citations

Book
01 Jan 1978
TL;DR: Bauer as discussed by the authors traces the background of Nazi antisemitism, outlines the actual murder campaign, and poses questions regarding the reaction to the Holocaust in the West, especially on the part of American Jewish leadership.
Abstract: The first chapter traces the background of Nazi antisemitism, outlines the actual murder cam­ paign, and poses questions regarding the reac­ tion in the West, especially on the part of American Jewish leadership. The second chap­ ter, “Against Mystification,” analyzes the vari­ ous attempts to obscure what really happened. Bauer critically evaluates the work of historians or pseudohistorians who have tried to deny or explain away the Holocaust, as well as those who have attempted to turn it into a mystical experience.

69 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a leading Holocaust scholar examines the dramatic attempts to negotiate with the Nazis for the release of Jews in exchange for money, goods, or political benefits, and explores the moral issues raised by the negotiations.
Abstract: In this riveting book, a leading Holocaust scholar examines the dramatic attempts to negotiate with the Nazis for the release of Jews in exchange for money, goods, or political benefits, and explores the moral issues raised by the negotiations.

43 citations


Cited by
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MonographDOI
01 May 2006

1,625 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors reflect after a very long day in Moscow on the rational choice of culture and the theory and practice of social capital in the social democratic welfare state, and the conditions of trust and the capacity of dialogue.
Abstract: 1. Reflections after a very long day in Moscow 2. On the rational choice of culture 3. On the theory and practice of social capital 4. Social capital in the social democratic welfare state 5. How is social capital produced? 6. The problem of institutional credibility 7. Trust and collective memories 8. The transition from mistrust to trust 9. The conditions of trust and the capacity of dialogue.

472 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The question of why fear overrides hope in societies embarked on the road of peacemaking after years of intractable conflict is answered on the basis of accumulated knowledge in the psychology and sociology of emotions as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The question of why fear overrides hope in societies embarked on the road of peacemaking after years of intractable conflict is answered on the basis of accumulated knowledge in the psychology and sociology of emotions. This knowledge suggests that fear is an automatic emotion, grounded in the perceived present and often based on the memorized past (also processed unconsciously), that leads to freezing of beliefs, conservatism, and sometimes preemptive aggression. Hope, in contrast, involves mostly cognitive activity, which requires the search for new ideas and thus is based on creativity and flexibility. Because hope is based on thinking, it can be seriously impeded by the spontaneous and unconscious interference of fear. Both fear and hope can become collective emotional orientations that organize society’s views and direct its forms of action. It is assumed that societies involved in intractable conflict are dominated by a collective emotional orientation of fear, which is functional in their coping with the stressful and demanding situation. But such an orientation serves as a psychological obstacle to a peace process once it starts. The Israeli Jewish case of collective fear orientation is offered as an example. The presentation includes the roots of this orientation, the ways in which it is reflected and disseminated, and its expressions among the Israeli Jewish public; it ends optimistically with the suggestion that societies can determine to overcome their fear and establish a collective orientation of hope for peace.

406 citations

Book
11 Dec 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the spirit and its expression in the ancient world, from Sun King to Revolution, and World War II to the present day, are discussed, and a survey of the results is presented.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. Fear, interest and honor 3. The spirit and its expression 4. The ancient world 5. Medieval Europe 6. From Sun King to Revolution 7. Imperialism and World War I 8. World War II 9. Hitler to Bush and beyond 10. General findings and conclusions.

403 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a survey of cases of massive state repression since World War II is presented, which includes sustained episodes in which the state or its agents impose on a communal or political group "conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or part".
Abstract: This paper reports on a global survey of cases of massive state repression since World War II. The universe of analysis includes sustained episodes in which the state or its agents impose on a communal or political group “conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or part.” We develop and use a typology which distinguishes between two categories of genocide (in which the victim groups are defined primarily in terms of communal characteristics) and four types of politicide (in which victim groups are defined in terms of their political status or opposition to the state). Forty-four episodes meet the operational guidelines developed here. Analysis of their properties and distribution shows that they occurred in all world regions, but with relatively few European and Latin American cases. Two or more began in each five-year period after 1945, with some clustering in the period of African decolonization; their median duration was five years. Aggregate fatalities were between seven and sixteen million people, at least as many who died in all international and civil wars in the period.

295 citations