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Yeon Soo Kim

Bio: Yeon Soo Kim is an academic researcher from Argonne National Laboratory. The author has contributed to research in topics: Burnup & Fission. The author has an hindex of 25, co-authored 116 publications receiving 2004 citations. Previous affiliations of Yeon Soo Kim include Ajou University & University of California, Berkeley.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors modeled fuel swelling of U-Mo alloy using the measured data from samples irradiated up to a fission density of ∼7 × 1024 fissions/m3 at temperatures below ∼250 °C.

148 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development.

132 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors calculated the thermo-migration fluxes of U, Pu and Zr in U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel during irradiation in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) using the constituent redistribution profiles measured in postirradiation examinations.

72 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: Uranium intermetallic fuels consisting of U-Al compounds, U-Si compounds, and U-Mo alloys are reviewed for thermophysical properties, fabrication methods, and irradiation behavior.
Abstract: Uranium intermetallic fuels consisting of U–Al compounds, U–Si compounds, and U–Mo alloys are reviewed for thermophysical properties, fabrication methods, and irradiation behavior. These fuels are chiefly used for research and test reactors. Therefore, they operate at temperatures lower than those of power reactor fuels, although their burnups are higher. These fuels are typically used in a dispersion form that is composed of fuel particles dispersed in an aluminum matrix, so interaction between fuel particles and matrix aluminum is an important fuel performance topic. The first intermetallic fuels for research and test reactors were U–Al alloys, followed by U–Si compounds, and then U–Mo alloys, each new fuel having a higher uranium density.

70 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an analytical expression of recrystallization kinetics of U-Mo fuel during irradiation has been developed through the usage of the Avrami equation, a phenomenological equation which is also used to describe similar typical transformation reactions, such as new phase formation.

68 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the development status for three accident tolerant fuel cladding technologies, namely coated zirconium-based cladding, ferritic alumina-forming alloy cladding and silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SCCM composite, is offered in this paper.

494 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review evaluates the latest techniques in direct immobilization and relevant biomaterials used for GF loading and release, including synthetic polymers, albumin, polysaccharides, lipids, mesoporous silica-based nanoparticles (NPs), and polymeric capsules and focuses on GF-encapsulated NPs in functionalized microporous scaffolds as a promising alternative.
Abstract: Growth factors (GFs) are soluble proteins secreted by cells that have the ability to regulate a variety of cellular processes and tissue regeneration. However, their translation into clinical applications is limited due to their short effective half-life, low stability, and rapid inactivation by enzymes under physiological conditions. To maximize the effectiveness of GFs and their biologically relevant applicability, a wide variety of sophisticated bio-inspired systems have been developed that augment tissue repair and cellular regeneration by controlling how much, when, and where GFs are released. Recently, protein immobilization techniques combined with nanomaterial carriers have shown promise in mimicking the natural healing cascade during tissue regeneration by augmenting the delivery and effectiveness of GFs. This review evaluates the latest techniques in direct immobilization and relevant biomaterials used for GF loading and release, including synthetic polymers, albumin, polysaccharides, lipids, mesoporous silica-based nanoparticles (NPs), and polymeric capsules. Specifically, we focus on GF-encapsulated NPs in functionalized microporous scaffolds as a promising alternative with the ability to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM) hierarchical architectures and components with high cell affinity and bioactivity. Finally, we discuss how these next-generation, advanced delivery systems have been used to enhance tissue repair and regeneration and consider future implications for their use in the field of regenerative medicine. Nanomaterials can speed up the rate at which wounds heal and tissue regenerates. Songlin Peng from the Jinan University Second College of Medicine, China, and colleagues review the development of artificial materials that achieve this aim by mimicking the hierarchical architecture of the extracellular matrix. Cells can proliferate and migrate by secreting proteins that signal to adjacent cells. These proteins – known as growth factors – bind to specific receptors on the target cell. But it is difficult to harness this simple concept in clinical applications such as wound healing because the instability of growth factors limits their safety and cost effectiveness. Peng and co-workers review recent progress in the use of functionalized microporous scaffolds functionalized with growth factor encapsulated nanoparticles. They also outline its advantages over alternative approaches employing polymers, lipids and mesoporous silica-based nanoparticles. Schematic illustration of Biomaterial Strategies for Controlled Growth Factor (GF) Delivery for Biomedical Applications. (a) The direct approaches for the immobilization/encapsulation of GFs to biomaterials; (b) Nanocarriers for GFs encapsulation and release; (c) GFs encapsulated nanocarriers functionalized biomaterials for tissue regeneration.

301 citations

Journal Article
Y.X. Wang, Z.Y. Pan, Y.K Ho, Yadong Xu, Aijun Du 
TL;DR: In this article, the impact-induced deposition of Al13 clusters with icosahedral structure on Ni(0 0 1) surface was studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation using Finnis-Sinclair potentials.
Abstract: The impact-induced deposition of Al13 clusters with icosahedral structure on Ni(0 0 1) surface was studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation using Finnis–Sinclair potentials. The incident kinetic energy (Ein) ranged from 0.01 to 30 eV per atom. The structural and dynamical properties of Al clusters on Ni surfaces were found to be strongly dependent on the impact energy. At much lower energy, the Al cluster deposited on the surface as a bulk molecule. However, the original icosahedral structure was transformed to the fcc-like one due to the interaction and the structure mismatch between the Al cluster and Ni surface. With increasing the impinging energy, the cluster was deformed severely when it contacted the substrate, and then broken up due to dense collision cascade. The cluster atoms spread on the surface at last. When the impact energy was higher than 11 eV, the defects, such as Al substitutions and Ni ejections, were observed. The simulation indicated that there exists an optimum energy range, which is suitable for Al epitaxial growth in layer by layer. In addition, at higher impinging energy, the atomic exchange between Al and Ni atoms will be favourable to surface alloying.

289 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors reviewed the selection of nuclear fuel cladding materials since the early reactors, illustrating some of the main failure modes and briefly discussing the challenges facing the development of fuel claddings materials for generation IV reactors.

246 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The US experience with mixed oxide, metal, and mixed carbide fuels is substantial, comprised of irradiation of over 50,000 MOX rods, over 130,000 metal rods, and 600 mixed-carbide rods, in EBR-II and FFTF alone as mentioned in this paper.

219 citations