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Author

Yogesh Ram Mishra

Bio: Yogesh Ram Mishra is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publication(s) receiving 16 citation(s).

Papers
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DissertationDOI

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01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this article, a reassessment of the Historiography of Iron and Salt in Colonial India is presented, with a focus on the history of iron and salt production in India.
Abstract: 5 Chapter 1 Rethinking Iron and Salt Manufacture in India, 1765-1858 9 Introduction Reassessment of the Historiography of Iron and Salt in Colonial India – Subject Matter of the Thesis – Chapter

16 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: In this paper, the East India Company crisis of 1772 and the committees of inquiry of 1773 are discussed. But the main focus is on trade, finance, and reform.
Abstract: List of tables Preface List of abbreviations Introduction 1. Traders into sovereigns: the East India Company, 1757-1765 2. Perceptions of empire 3. The policy-makers: Parliament and the East India Company 4. Crown and Company (I): the Diwani and the inquiry of 1767 5. Crown and Company (II): foreign relations, 1766-1769 6. Attempts at reform (I): civil, military, and judicial affairs, 1767-1772 7. Attempts at reform (II): trade and revenue, 1767-1772 8. The East India Company crisis of 1772 9. Response to crisis (I): high politics and the committees of inquiry, 1772-1773 10. Response to crisis (II): trade, finance, and reform 11. The final act? the passage of Lord North's East India legislation, 1773 Conclusion Select bibliography Index.

37 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: Deans-Smith as discussed by the authors studied the tobacco monopoly in colonial Mexico and found that there was as much continuity as change after the monopoly's establishment, and that the popular response was characterized by accommodation, as well as defiance and resistance.
Abstract: A government monopoly provides an excellent case study of state-society relationships. This is especially true of the tobacco monopoly in colonial Mexico, whose revenues in the later half of the eighteenth century were second only to the silver tithe as the most valuable source of government income. This comprehensive study of the tobacco monopoly illuminates many of the most important themes of eighteenth-century Mexican social and economic history, from issues of economic growth and the supply of agricultural credit to rural relations, labor markets, urban protest and urban workers, class formation, work discipline, and late colonial political culture. Drawing on exhaustive research of previously unused archival sources, Susan Deans-Smith examines a wide range of new questions. Who were the bureaucrats who managed this colonial state enterprise and what policies did they adopt to develop it? How profitable were the tobacco manufactories, and how rational was their organization? What impact did the reorganization of the tobacco trade have upon those people it affected most--the tobacco planters and tobacco workers? This research uncovers much that was not previously known about the Bourbon government's management of the tobacco monopoly and the problems and limitations it faced. Deans-Smith finds that there was as much continuity as change after the monopoly's establishment, and that the popular response was characterized by accommodation, as well as defiance and resistance. She argues that the problems experienced by the monopoly at the beginning of the nineteenth century did not originate from any simmering, entrenched opposition. Rather, an emphasis upon political stabilityand short-term profits prevented any innovative reforms that might have improved the monopoly's long-term performance and productivity. With detailed quantitative data and rare material on the urban working poor of colonial Mexico, Bureaucrats, Planters, and Workers will be important reading for all students of social, economic, and labor history, especially of Mexico and Latin America.

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: In an age when we are increasingly aware of large scale drug use, the authors takes a long look at the history of our relationship with mind-altering substances, and the opium trade in the nineteenth century tells us a great deal about Asian herion traffic today.
Abstract: Drug epidemics are clearly not just a peculiar feature of modern life; the opium trade in the nineteenth century tells us a great deal about Asian herion traffic today. In an age when we are increasingly aware of large scale drug use, this book takes a long look at the history of our relationship with mind-altering substances. Engagingly written, with lay readers as much as specialists in mind, this book will be fascinating reading for historians, social scientists, as well as those involved in Asian studies, or economic history.

8 citations

Book ChapterDOI

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01 Apr 2001
TL;DR: In this paper, the early eighteenth-century sources are supplemented with material from later in the century, which is much more plentiful and far more detailed, but it is not used to introduce new elements to the picture or argument and only drawn upon when it is consistent with evidence from the first half of the century.
Abstract: It is no easy matter to reconstruct the relationship between weavers and merchants in the early eighteenth century. Much of the material in the European Company records, the major source for the social and economic history of the period, deals largely with the Companies' external trade and their commercial activities in South India. However, the ninety years of documents, from 1670 to 1760, which comprise the English East India Company's Fort St. George and Fort St. David Consultations and upon which this chapter is based, also contain occasional glimpses of local social and economic life. Some of the most valuable insights are found during crises in cloth production. At these times the English interrogated their merchants to understand the reasons for the shortfalls in cloth production and delivery. On occasion, Company servants themselves ventured into the weaving villages. These moments are veritable gold mines for the historian. In this chapter, the early eighteenth-century sources are supplemented wherever possible with material from later in the century. The later material is much more plentiful and far more detailed, but I have used such evidence carefully. It is not used to introduce new elements to the picture or argument and it is only drawn upon when it is consistent with evidence from the first half of the century. I have used it to fill out the picture – to give it flesh and blood, so to speak. The skeleton, however, has been constructed from early eighteenth-century material.

5 citations