scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Yoshiaki Yasuno

Other affiliations: Tokyo Medical University
Bio: Yoshiaki Yasuno is an academic researcher from University of Tsukuba. The author has contributed to research in topics: Optical coherence tomography & Birefringence. The author has an hindex of 50, co-authored 349 publications receiving 9275 citations. Previous affiliations of Yoshiaki Yasuno include Tokyo Medical University.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The profile of choroidal thickness depends on its location, and RE, axial length, and especially age are critical for evaluation of chiroidal thickness.
Abstract: Purpose. To study posterior choroidal thickness and its profile based on location in healthy Japanese subjects and the correlation with axial length, refractive error (RE), and age. Methods. Eighty-six eyes of 43 healthy volunteers with no ophthalmic or systemic symptoms were examined with prototype high-penetration optical coherence tomography using a 1060-nm light source. Eyes with high myopia (exceeding -6 D) or with retinal/choroidal disease were excluded. The spherical equivalent RE was measured by autorefractometry, and the axial length was measured by partial coherence inferometry. Results. Mean choroidal thicknesses were 354 +/- 111 mum at the fovea, 364 +/- 86 mum superiorly, 345 +/- 108 mum inferiorly, 227 +/- 532 mum nasally, and 337 +/- 102 mum temporally. Subfoveal choroidal thickness was significantly greater than nasal (P < 0.01) and temporal (P < 0.05) choroidal thickness; however, there was no significant difference compared with superior (P = 0.20) and inferior (P = 0.17) choroidal thickness. The temporal choroid was significantly (P < 0.01) thicker than the nasal choroid, and the inferior choroid was significantly (P < 0.01) thinner than the superior choroid. There was a significant negative correlation between foveal choroidal thickness and axial length (P < 0.05) but a borderline correlation with the RE (P = 0.086) and age (P = 0.07). Age was the factor that was most associated with the choroidal thickness (F = 20.86; P < 0.001), followed by RE (F = 5.37; P < 0.05); axial length was not a significant factor (F = 1.47; P = 0.22) by stepwise analysis. Conclusions. The profile of choroidal thickness depends on its location. RE, axial length, and especially age are critical for evaluation of choroidal thickness.

650 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Noninvasive angiography is demonstrated for the in vivo human eye with high-speed spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and three-dimensional vasculature of ocular vessels has been visualized.
Abstract: Noninvasive angiography is demonstrated for the in vivo human eye. Three-dimensional flow imaging has been performed with high-speed spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Sample motion is compensated by two algorithms. Axial motion between adjacent A-lines within one OCT image is compensated by the Doppler shift due to bulk sample motion. Axial displacements between neighboring images are compensated by a correlation-based algorithm. Three-dimensional vasculature of ocular vessels has been visualized. By integrating volume sets of flow images, two-dimensional images of blood vessels are obtained. Retinal and choroidal blood vessel images are simultaneously obtained by separating the volume set into retinal part and choroidal parts. These are corresponding to fluorescein angiogram and indocyanine angiogram.

574 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A simple calibration method using a fringe analysis technique for spectral rescaling is presented, which shows that the system sensitivity is experimentally determined to be 114 dB, and the three-dimensional OCT volumes reveal the structures of the anterior eye segments, which are difficult to observe in two- dimensional OCT images.
Abstract: A two- and three-dimensional swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system, which uses a ready-to-ship scanning light source, is demonstrated. The light source has a center wavelength of 1.31 mum, -3 dB wavelength range of 110 nm, scanning rate of 20 KHz, and high linearity in frequency scanning. This paper presents a simple calibration method using a fringe analysis technique for spectral rescaling. This SS-OCT system is capable of realtime display of two-dimensional OCT and can obtain three-dimensional OCT with a measurement time of 2 s. In vivo human anterior eye segments are investigated two- and three-dimensionally. The system sensitivity is experimentally determined to be 114 dB. The three-dimensional OCT volumes reveal the structures of the anterior eye segments, which are difficult to observe in two-dimensional OCT images.

378 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A software-based algorithm of scattering optical coherence angiography (S-OCA) is developed for the high-contrast and 3D imaging of the choroidal vessels.
Abstract: Retinal, choroidal and scleral imaging by using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) with a 1-microm band probe light, and high-contrast and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the choroidal vasculature are presented. This SS-OCT has a measurement speed of 28,000 A-lines/s, a depth resolution of 10.4 microm in tissue, and a sensitivity of 99.3 dB. Owing to the high penetration of the 1-microm probe light and the high sensitivity of the system, the in vivo sclera of a healthy volunteer can be observed. A software-based algorithm of scattering optical coherence angiography (S-OCA) is developed for the high-contrast and 3D imaging of the choroidal vessels. The S-OCA is used to visualize the 3D choroidal vasculature of the in vivo human macula and the optic nerve head. Comparisons of S-OCA with several other angiography techniques including Doppler OCA, Doppler OCT, fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography are also presented.

332 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The OCT system successfully reveals the birefringent nature of human skin tissue through the measurement of the distribution of each element of the Müller matrix of a measured object from 16 OCT images.
Abstract: We have developed a spectral interferometric optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with polarization sensitivity that is able to measure a two-dimensional tomographic image by means of one-dimensional mechanical scanning. Our system, which has an axial resolution of 32 mum , calculates the distribution of each element of the Muller matrix of a measured object from 16 OCT images. The OCT system successfully reveals the birefringent nature of human skin tissue.

289 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a fast Fourier transform method of topography and interferometry is proposed to discriminate between elevation and depression of the object or wave-front form, which has not been possible by the fringe-contour generation techniques.
Abstract: A fast-Fourier-transform method of topography and interferometry is proposed. By computer processing of a noncontour type of fringe pattern, automatic discrimination is achieved between elevation and depression of the object or wave-front form, which has not been possible by the fringe-contour-generation techniques. The method has advantages over moire topography and conventional fringe-contour interferometry in both accuracy and sensitivity. Unlike fringe-scanning techniques, the method is easy to apply because it uses no moving components.

3,742 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: OCT as discussed by the authors synthesises cross-sectional images from a series of laterally adjacent depth-scans, which can be used to assess tissue and cell function and morphology in situ.
Abstract: There have been three basic approaches to optical tomography since the early 1980s: diffraction tomography, diffuse optical tomography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Optical techniques are of particular importance in the medical field, because these techniques promise to be safe and cheap and, in addition, offer a therapeutic potential. Advances in OCT technology have made it possible to apply OCT in a wide variety of applications but medical applications are still dominating. Specific advantages of OCT are its high depth and transversal resolution, the fact, that its depth resolution is decoupled from transverse resolution, high probing depth in scattering media, contact-free and non-invasive operation, and the possibility to create various function dependent image contrasting methods. This report presents the principles of OCT and the state of important OCT applications. OCT synthesises cross-sectional images from a series of laterally adjacent depth-scans. At present OCT is used in three different fields of optical imaging, in macroscopic imaging of structures which can be seen by the naked eye or using weak magnifications, in microscopic imaging using magnifications up to the classical limit of microscopic resolution and in endoscopic imaging, using low and medium magnification. First, OCT techniques, like the reflectometry technique and the dual beam technique were based on time-domain low coherence interferometry depth-scans. Later, Fourier-domain techniques have been developed and led to new imaging schemes. Recently developed parallel OCT schemes eliminate the need for lateral scanning and, therefore, dramatically increase the imaging rate. These schemes use CCD cameras and CMOS detector arrays as photodetectors. Video-rate three-dimensional OCT pictures have been obtained. Modifying interference microscopy techniques has led to high-resolution optical coherence microscopy that achieved sub-micrometre resolution. This report is concluded with a short presentation of important OCT applications. Ophthalmology is, due to the transparent ocular structures, still the main field of OCT application. The first commercial instrument too has been introduced for ophthalmic diagnostics (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG). Advances in using near-infrared light, however, opened the path for OCT imaging in strongly scattering tissues. Today, optical in vivo biopsy is one of the most challenging fields of OCT application. High resolution, high penetration depth, and its potential for functional imaging attribute to OCT an optical biopsy quality, which can be used to assess tissue and cell function and morphology in situ. OCT can already clarify the relevant architectural tissue morphology. For many diseases, however, including cancer in its early stages, higher resolution is necessary. New broad-bandwidth light sources, like photonic crystal fibres and superfluorescent fibre sources, and new contrasting techniques, give access to new sample properties and unmatched sensitivity and resolution.

1,914 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) was proposed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of flow detection.
Abstract: Amplitude decorrelation measurement is sensitive to transverse flow and immune to phase noise in comparison to Doppler and other phase-based approaches. However, the high axial resolution of OCT makes it very sensitive to the pulsatile bulk motion noise in the axial direction. To overcome this limitation, we developed split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of flow detection. The full OCT spectrum was split into several narrower bands. Inter-B-scan decorrelation was computed using the spectral bands separately and then averaged. The SSADA algorithm was tested on in vivo images of the human macula and optic nerve head. It significantly improved both SNR for flow detection and connectivity of microvascular network when compared to other amplitude-decorrelation algorithms.

1,507 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, optical coherence tomography is used for high-resolution, noninvasive imaging of the human retina, including the macula and optic nerve head in normal human subjects.
Abstract: Objective: To demonstrate optical coherence tomography for high-resolution, noninvasive imaging of the human retina. Optical coherence tomography is a new imaging technique analogous to ultrasound B scan that can provide cross-sectional images of the retina with micrometer-scale resolution. Design: Survey optical coherence tomographic examination of the retina, including the macula and optic nerve head in normal human subjects. Settings Research laboratory. Participants: Convenience sample of normal human subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation of optical coherence retinal tomographs with known normal retinal anatomy. Results: Optical coherence tomographs can discriminate the cross-sectional morphologic features of the fovea and optic disc, the layered structure of the retina, and normal anatomic variations in retinal and retinal nerve fiber layer thicknesses with 10- μm depth resolution. Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is a potentially useful technique for high depth resolution, cross-sectional examination of the fundus.

1,409 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, optical coherence tomography was adapted to allow high-speed visualization of tissue in a living animal with a catheter-endoscope 1 millimeter in diameter, which was used to obtain cross-sectional images of the rabbit gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts at 10-micrometer resolution.
Abstract: Current medical imaging technologies allow visualization of tissue anatomy in the human body at resolutions ranging from 100 micrometers to 1 millimeter. These technologies are generally not sensitive enough to detect early-stage tissue abnormalities associated with diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis, which require micrometer-scale resolution. Here, optical coherence tomography was adapted to allow high-speed visualization of tissue in a living animal with a catheter-endoscope 1 millimeter in diameter. This method, referred to as "optical biopsy," was used to obtain cross-sectional images of the rabbit gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts at 10-micrometer resolution.

1,285 citations