scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Yuguang Fang

Bio: Yuguang Fang is an academic researcher from University of Florida. The author has contributed to research in topics: Wireless ad hoc network & Throughput. The author has an hindex of 79, co-authored 572 publications receiving 20715 citations. Previous affiliations of Yuguang Fang include Shandong University & New Jersey Institute of Technology.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive survey of WSNSecurity issues that were investigated by researchers in recent years and that shed light on future directions for WSN security are presented.
Abstract: The significant advances of hardware manufacturing technology and the development of efficient software algorithms make technically and economically feasible a network composed of numerous, small, low-cost sensors using wireless communications, that is, a wireless sensor network. WSNs have attracted intensive interest from both academia and industry due to their wide application in civil and military scenarios. In hostile scenarios, it is very important to protect WSNs from malicious attacks. Due to various resource limitations and the salient features of a wireless sensor network, the security design for such networks is significantly challenging. In this article, we present a comprehensive survey of WSN security issues that were investigated by researchers in recent years and that shed light on future directions for WSN security.

432 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is observed that due to the mobility, some assumptions may not be valid, which is the case when the average values of channel holding times for new calls and handoff calls are not equal.
Abstract: Call admission control (CAC) plays a significant role in providing the desired quality of service in wireless networks. Many CAC schemes have been proposed. Analytical results for some performance metrics such as call blocking probabilities are obtained under some specific assumptions. It is observed, however, that due to the mobility, some assumptions may not be valid, which is the case when the average values of channel holding times for new calls and handoff calls are not equal. We reexamine some of the analytical results for call blocking probabilities for some call admission control schemes under more general assumptions and provide some easier-to-compute approximate formulas.

408 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposes a security system for VANETs to achieve privacy desired by vehicles and traceability required by law enforcement authorities, in addition to satisfying fundamental security requirements including authentication, nonrepudiation, message integrity, and confidentiality.
Abstract: Vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) can offer various services and benefits to users and thus deserves deployment effort. Attacking and misusing such network could cause destructive consequences. It is therefore necessary to integrate security requirements into the design of VANETs and defend VANET systems against misbehavior, in order to ensure correct and smooth operations of the network. In this paper, we propose a security system for VANETs to achieve privacy desired by vehicles and traceability required by law enforcement authorities, in addition to satisfying fundamental security requirements including authentication, nonrepudiation, message integrity, and confidentiality. Moreover, we propose a privacy-preserving defense technique for network authorities to handle misbehavior in VANET access, considering the challenge that privacy provides avenue for misbehavior. The proposed system employs an identity-based cryptosystem where certificates are not needed for authentication. We show the fulfillment and feasibility of our system with respect to the security goals and efficiency.

343 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that the exponential distribution is a good approximation model for the MAC layer service time for the queueing analysis, and the presented queueing models can accurately match the simulation data obtained from ns-2 when the arrival process at MAC layer is Poissonian.
Abstract: Summary IEEE 802.11 MAC protocol is the de facto standard for wireless local area networks (LANs), and has also been implemented in many network simulation packages for wireless multi-hop ad hoc networks. However, it is well known that, as the number of active stations increases, the performance of IEEE 802.11 MAC in terms of delay and throughput degrades dramatically, especially when each station’s load approaches its saturation state. To explore the inherent problems in this protocol, it is important to characterize the probability distribution of the packet service time at the MAC layer. In this paper, by modeling the exponential backoff process as a Markov chain, we can use the signal transfer function of the generalized state transition diagram to derive an approximate probability distribution of the MAC layer service time. We then present the discrete probability distribution for MAC layer packet service time, which is shown to accurately match the simulation data from network simulations. Based on the probability model for the MAC layer service time, we can analyze a few performance metrics of the wireless LAN and give better explanation to the performance degradation in delay and throughput at various traffic loads. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the exponential distribution is a good approximation model for the MAC layer service time for the queueing analysis, and the presented queueing models can accurately match the simulation data obtained from ns-2 when the arrival process at MAC layer is Poissonian. Copyright # 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

343 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A suite of location-based compromise-tolerant security mechanisms, based on a new cryptographic concept called pairing, by binding private keys of individual nodes to both their IDs and geographic locations, and an LBK-based neighborhood authentication scheme to localize the impact of compromised nodes to their vicinity are proposed.
Abstract: Node compromise is a serious threat to wireless sensor networks deployed in unattended and hostile environments. To mitigate the impact of compromised nodes, we propose a suite of location-based compromise-tolerant security mechanisms. Based on a new cryptographic concept called pairing, we propose the notion of location-based keys (LBKs) by binding private keys of individual nodes to both their IDs and geographic locations. We then develop an LBK-based neighborhood authentication scheme to localize the impact of compromised nodes to their vicinity. We also present efficient approaches to establish a shared key between any two network nodes. In contrast to previous key establishment solutions, our approaches feature nearly perfect resilience to node compromise, low communication and computation overhead, low memory requirements, and high network scalability. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of LBKs in counteracting several notorious attacks against sensor networks such as the Sybil attack, the identity replication attack, and wormhole and sinkhole attacks. Finally, we propose a location-based threshold-endorsement scheme, called LTE, to thwart the infamous bogus data injection attack, in which adversaries inject lots of bogus data into the network. The utility of LTE in achieving remarkable energy savings is validated by detailed performance evaluation.

342 citations


Cited by
More filters
Proceedings ArticleDOI
22 Jan 2006
TL;DR: Some of the major results in random graphs and some of the more challenging open problems are reviewed, including those related to the WWW.
Abstract: We will review some of the major results in random graphs and some of the more challenging open problems. We will cover algorithmic and structural questions. We will touch on newer models, including those related to the WWW.

7,116 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
05 Mar 2007
TL;DR: This work reviews several recent results on estimation, analysis, and controller synthesis for NCSs, and addresses channel limitations in terms of packet-rates, sampling, network delay, and packet dropouts.
Abstract: Networked control systems (NCSs) are spatially distributed systems for which the communication between sensors, actuators, and controllers is supported by a shared communication network. We review several recent results on estimation, analysis, and controller synthesis for NCSs. The results surveyed address channel limitations in terms of packet-rates, sampling, network delay, and packet dropouts. The results are presented in a tutorial fashion, comparing alternative methodologies

3,748 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: Weakconvergence methods in metric spaces were studied in this article, with applications sufficient to show their power and utility, and the results of the first three chapters are used in Chapter 4 to derive a variety of limit theorems for dependent sequences of random variables.
Abstract: The author's preface gives an outline: "This book is about weakconvergence methods in metric spaces, with applications sufficient to show their power and utility. The Introduction motivates the definitions and indicates how the theory will yield solutions to problems arising outside it. Chapter 1 sets out the basic general theorems, which are then specialized in Chapter 2 to the space C[0, l ] of continuous functions on the unit interval and in Chapter 3 to the space D [0, 1 ] of functions with discontinuities of the first kind. The results of the first three chapters are used in Chapter 4 to derive a variety of limit theorems for dependent sequences of random variables. " The book develops and expands on Donsker's 1951 and 1952 papers on the invariance principle and empirical distributions. The basic random variables remain real-valued although, of course, measures on C[0, l ] and D[0, l ] are vitally used. Within this framework, there are various possibilities for a different and apparently better treatment of the material. More of the general theory of weak convergence of probabilities on separable metric spaces would be useful. Metrizability of the convergence is not brought up until late in the Appendix. The close relation of the Prokhorov metric and a metric for convergence in probability is (hence) not mentioned (see V. Strassen, Ann. Math. Statist. 36 (1965), 423-439; the reviewer, ibid. 39 (1968), 1563-1572). This relation would illuminate and organize such results as Theorems 4.1, 4.2 and 4.4 which give isolated, ad hoc connections between weak convergence of measures and nearness in probability. In the middle of p. 16, it should be noted that C*(S) consists of signed measures which need only be finitely additive if 5 is not compact. On p. 239, where the author twice speaks of separable subsets having nonmeasurable cardinal, he means "discrete" rather than "separable." Theorem 1.4 is Ulam's theorem that a Borel probability on a complete separable metric space is tight. Theorem 1 of Appendix 3 weakens completeness to topological completeness. After mentioning that probabilities on the rationals are tight, the author says it is an

3,554 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1975
TL;DR: The Fundamentals of Queueing Theory, Fourth Edition as discussed by the authors provides a comprehensive overview of simple and more advanced queuing models, with a self-contained presentation of key concepts and formulae.
Abstract: Praise for the Third Edition: "This is one of the best books available. Its excellent organizational structure allows quick reference to specific models and its clear presentation . . . solidifies the understanding of the concepts being presented."IIE Transactions on Operations EngineeringThoroughly revised and expanded to reflect the latest developments in the field, Fundamentals of Queueing Theory, Fourth Edition continues to present the basic statistical principles that are necessary to analyze the probabilistic nature of queues. Rather than presenting a narrow focus on the subject, this update illustrates the wide-reaching, fundamental concepts in queueing theory and its applications to diverse areas such as computer science, engineering, business, and operations research.This update takes a numerical approach to understanding and making probable estimations relating to queues, with a comprehensive outline of simple and more advanced queueing models. Newly featured topics of the Fourth Edition include:Retrial queuesApproximations for queueing networksNumerical inversion of transformsDetermining the appropriate number of servers to balance quality and cost of serviceEach chapter provides a self-contained presentation of key concepts and formulae, allowing readers to work with each section independently, while a summary table at the end of the book outlines the types of queues that have been discussed and their results. In addition, two new appendices have been added, discussing transforms and generating functions as well as the fundamentals of differential and difference equations. New examples are now included along with problems that incorporate QtsPlus software, which is freely available via the book's related Web site.With its accessible style and wealth of real-world examples, Fundamentals of Queueing Theory, Fourth Edition is an ideal book for courses on queueing theory at the upper-undergraduate and graduate levels. It is also a valuable resource for researchers and practitioners who analyze congestion in the fields of telecommunications, transportation, aviation, and management science.

2,562 citations