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Yuluo Chen

Bio: Yuluo Chen is an academic researcher from Guangzhou Medical University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Medicine & Internal medicine. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 3 publications receiving 4 citations. Previous affiliations of Yuluo Chen include South China University of Technology.

Papers
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Posted ContentDOI
05 May 2020
TL;DR: The cure rate and the mortality of the elderly seemed to be no worse than that of the young, though the elderly were with longer hospitalization, and more severe cases and complications in elderly patients should prompt for more complex treatment and special considerations.
Abstract: Objective: To clarify the outcomes of elderly patients with COVID-19.Methods: All 265 confirmed adult patients with COVID-19 were included in this retrospective study, 43 (16.2%) of whom were 65 years and older. Electronic medical records of the subjects were reviewed to obtain information on clinical characteristics and outcomes. The allocations of medical resource were also recorded.Results: Only one death case occurred in the elderly. The mortality of elderly patients was no higher than that of young patients (2.3% vs. 0%, P = 0.126). The cure rate was 95.3% in elderly patients and 99.5% in young patients (P = 0.067), and the duration of hospitalization is 27 days in elderly patients and 18 days in young patients (P = 0.001). The elderly suffered from more comorbidities (67.4% vs. 24.8%, P < 0.001), most of which is hypertension. Significantly more severe cases occurred in elderly patients compared with young patients (37.2% vs. 16.7%, P = 0.004). The elderly were more likely to present with complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute myocardial injury, septic shock and acute kidney injury (all P < 0.05), respectively. No medical staffs were infected during the treatment of COVID-19.Conclusion: The cure rate and the mortality of the elderly seemed to be no worse than that of the young, though the elderly were with longer hospitalization. Elderly patients with COVID-19 could be treatable if handled properly. More severe cases and complications in elderly patients should prompt for more complex treatment and special considerations.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Aug 2022-Polymers
TL;DR: In this article , a triple crosslinking strategy, including pre-rolling, solvent and chemical imidization cross-linking, was proposed to solve the problem of low electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber membranes.
Abstract: In order to solve the problem of low electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber membranes, a novel triple crosslinking strategy, including pre-rolling, solvent and chemical imidization crosslinking, was proposed to prepare carbon nanofiber membranes with a chemical crosslinking structure (CNMs-CC) derived from electrospinning polyimide nanofiber membranes. The physical-chemical characteristics of CNMs-CC as freestanding anodes for lithium-ion batteries were investigated in detail, along with carbon nanofiber membranes without a crosslinking structure (CNMs) and carbon nanofiber membranes with a physical crosslinking structure (CNMs-PC) as references. Further investigation demonstrates that CNMs-CC exhibits excellent rate performance and long cycle stability, compared with CNMs and CNMs-PC. At 50 mA g−1, CNMs-CC delivers a reversible specific capacity of 495 mAh g−1. In particular, the specific capacity of CNMs-CC is still as high as 290.87 mAh g−1 and maintains 201.38 mAh g−1 after 1000 cycles at a high current density of 1 A g−1. The excellent electrochemical performance of the CNMs-CC is attributed to the unique crosslinking structure derived from the novel triple crosslinking strategy, which imparts fast electron transfer and ion diffusion kinetics, as well as a stable structure that withstands repeated impacts of ions during charging and discharging process. Therefore, CNMs-CC shows great potential to be the freestanding electrodes applied in the field of flexible lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors owing to the optimized structure strategy and improved properties.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 2020-Medicine
TL;DR: This work describes an unusual case of malignant hyperthermia and refractory hyponatremia due to trihexyphenidyl adverse reaction in a fifty-five-year-old male with pneumonia who has a history of Parkinson's disease.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a cross-sectional study explores the features of osteoporosis in male patients with bronchiectasis and finds that the prevalence of osteopsorosis was higher in male bronchictasis patients than that in controls.
Abstract: Background Osteoporosis increases the burden and disease related adverse events of comorbidities in some chronic disease. The relationships between osteoporosis and bronchiectasis are not fully understood. This cross-sectional study explores the features of osteoporosis in male patients with bronchiectasis. Methods From January 2017 to December 2019, male patients (age >50 years) with stable bronchiectasis were included, as were normal subjects. Data on demographic characteristics and clinical features were collected. Results Totally, 108 male patients with bronchiectasis and 56 controls were analyzed. Osteoporosis was observed in 31.5% (34/108) of patients with bronchiectasis and 17.9% (10/56) of controls (P=0.001). The T-score negatively correlated with age (R=−0.235, P=0.014) and bronchiectasis severity index score (BSI; R=−0.336, P<0.001). BSI score ≥9 was a major factor associated with osteoporosis [odd ratio (OR) =4.52; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57–12.96; P=0.005]. Other factors associated with osteoporosis included body-mass index (BMI) <18.5 kg/m2 (OR =3.44; 95% CI: 1.13–10.46; P=0.030), age ≥65 years (OR =2.87; 95% CI: 1.01–7.55; P=0.033), and a smoking history (OR =2.78; 95% CI: 1.04–7.47; P=0.042). Conclusions The prevalence of osteoporosis was higher in male bronchiectasis patients than that in controls. Factors including age, BMI, smoking history, and BSI were associated with osteoporosis. Early diagnosis and treatment might be of great value in prevention and management of osteoporosis in patients with bronchiectasis.
Journal ArticleDOI
29 Jun 2020
TL;DR: In this guideline, the susceptibility of the elderly to critical illness, and the causes of this vulnerability are analyzed, and recommendations from three perspectives are proposed: infection source, transmission route, and susceptible population.
Abstract: Elderly people have weakened immune functions and suffer from many underlying chronic diseases They are at high risk of contracting COVID-19 Most of the patients who died of COVID-19 were either elderly persons or patients with underlying diseases Therefore, it is important to improve the knowledge and awareness of the prevention of COVID-19 among the elderly In this guideline, we analyze the susceptibility of the elderly to critical illness, and the causes of this vulnerability Based on the characteristics of the prevention and control of COVID-19 among elderly people, we propose recommendations from three perspectives: infection source, transmission route, and susceptible population These measures can help reduce the infection of the elderly with COVID-19 Keywords: Elderly people, COVID-19, prevention, SARS-CoV-2

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
Gang Xu1, Min Ye1, Jun Zhao1, Feng Liu1, Wei Ma1 
24 Jul 2020
TL;DR: Though case fatality varied in different areas and seemed not to be different in some areas, the reasons are still unclear due to insufficient evidences, and further research is needed.
Abstract: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COIVD-19) was first reported in December 2019 in China (Wang et al. 2020) and spread worldwide some months later. As of May 18, there are more than 4,000,000 cases of COVID-19 infection in about 200 countries and regions, leading to a death toll of about 300,000. Given that older adults are more susceptible to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), Nikolich-Zugich et al. (2020) summarized the pathogenesis and clinical characteristics of COVID-19 in older adults in detail. Age-related changes account for chronic comorbidities and slow the immune responses, causing more severe cases and complications in older adults. NikolichZugich et al. (2020) provide many facilities for studies on COVID-19 in older adults and help clinicians have an overall understanding of these characteristics. However, some controversies exist, which are of concern. Previous studies showed increased morbidity and mortality in older adults with COVID-19 (Wang et al. 2020). The case fatality in older adults varied from 0 to 35.6% (Table 1) in different regions (Chen et al. 2020b; Gold et al. 2020; Huang et al. 2020; Liu et al. 2020). It was higher in older adults than in younger adults in higher prevalence areas (Chen et al. 2020b; Gold et al. 2020). However, as far as case fatality was concerned, there was no difference between the two age groups in lower prevalence areas (Liu et al. 2020; Huang et al. 2020). These results were consistent with our study on older adults with COVID-19 in Guangzhou (Xu et al. 2020). Though case fatality varied in different areas and seemed not to be different in some areas, the reasons are still unclear due to insufficient evidences. Knowing the reasons will be of great help in the prevention and control of COVID-19. Since delayed hospitalization may be contributed to poorer outcomes (Liang et al. 2020) and older patients suffer a high risk of death, early diagnosis and intensive care are particularly important (Chen et al. 2020a); these strategies require adequate medical policies and resources. However, no study has evaluated the role of medical policies and resources against COVID-19, and further research is needed. Studies in lower prevalence areas showed that the outcomes of older patients seemed not to be worse than that of younger patients. Older patients with COVID-19 could be treatable, and comprehensive assessment should be prompt. In addition, pneumonia in older adults often present in an atypical fashion, which means the absence of fever and respiratory symptoms, while symptoms manifested outside the respiratory tract. In older patients with COVID-19, fever is the most common symptom, followed by cough, fatigue, pharyngalgia, expectoration, dyspnea, and others. Studies found no difference in fever or cough between the older and younger people (Chen et al. 2020b; Liu et al. 2020; Xu et al. 2020). Some patients were asymptomatic, and the ratio of asymptomatic patients seemed not to be different GeroScience https://doi.org/10.1007/s11357-020-00232-x

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
05 Mar 2021-iScience
TL;DR: In this article, the association of host co-morbidities (chronic respiratory illnesses, cardiovascular disease [CVD], hypertension or diabetes mellitus [DM]) with the acute cardiovascular complications associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection was analyzed.

3 citations

Posted ContentDOI
23 Jun 2020-medRxiv
TL;DR: Older age and pre-existing chronic respiratory illness, CVD, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus may represent prognostic factors for the development of additional cardiac complications in COVID-19, highlighting the need for a multidisciplinary approach to chronic disease patient management and providing justification for a larger scale observational study.
Abstract: Importance: SARS-CoV-2 is associated with multiple direct and indirect effects to the heart. It is not yet well defined whether patient groups at increased risk of severe respiratory disease due to SARS-CoV-2 infection also experience a heightened incidence of cardiac complications. Objective: We sought to analyse the role of pre-existing chronic disease (chronic respiratory illness, cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension and diabetes mellitus) in the development of cardiac complications from SARS-CoV-2. Data Sources: We retrospectively investigated published (including pre-prints), publicly released, de-identified, data made available between Dec 1, 2019, and May 11, 2020. Information was accessed from PubMed, Embase, medRxiv and SSRN. Study Selection: 379 full-text articles were reviewed and 321 excluded for lack of original research, irrelevance to outcome, inappropriate cohort, or small patient numbers (case reports of <10 patients). Data were extracted from two studies and the remaining 56 contacted to request appropriate data, to which three responded with data contributions. A final of five studies were included. Data Extraction and Synthesis: This systematic review was conducted based on PRISMA and MOOSE statements. Included studies were critically appraised using Newcastle Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS). Data were extracted independently by multiple observers. A fixed-effects model was selected for the meta-analysis based on relatively low heterogeneity between the studies (I2<50%). Main Outcome and Measures: Cardiac complications were determined via blood levels of cardiac biomarkers above the 99th percentile of the upper reference limit, abnormalities in electrocardiography, and/or abnormalities in echocardiography. Results: SARS-CoV-2-infected patients who developed cardiac complications were, on average, 10 years older than those that did not. Pooled analyses showed the development of cardiac complications from SARS-CoV-2 was significantly increased in patients with underlying chronic respiratory illness (OR 2.88[1.45,5.71]), CVD (OR 5.12[3.09,8.48]), hypertension (OR 4.37[2.99,6.39]) and diabetes mellitus (OR 2.61[1.67,4.09]). Conclusions and Relevance: Older age and pre-existing chronic respiratory illness, CVD, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus may represent prognostic factors for the development of additional cardiac complications in COVID-19, highlighting the need for a multidisciplinary approach to chronic disease patient management and providing justification for a larger scale observational study.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There seemed to be no re-infection in the cured COVID-19 patients in Guangzhou, suggesting that the cured do not cause the spread of disease.
Abstract: Objectives: To clarify the clinical characteristics of cured patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), and to clarify the re-infection and person-to-person transmission in the cured. Methods: A total of 187 cured COVID-19 patients with antibody test were followed up every 2 weeks in this retrospective observational study. Assessment for general condition, symptoms, epidemiological contact history, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, and antibody tests were performed and recorded. Information from Guangzhou CDC was also screened. Results: There were 33 (17.6%) patients with negative results for IgG and 35 (18.7%) patients with positive results for IgM. The average days of antibody detection from disease onset were 53.0. PCR assay was positive in 10 (5.3%) patients during the follow-up. Neither IgG nor IgM results showed a relationship with PCR test results (all P > 0.05). Neither re-infection nor person-to-person transmission was found in the cured patients. Factors associated with appearance of antibody comprised hospitalization days (OR: 1.06, 95%CI: 1.02-1.11, P = 0.006) and antibiotics treatment (OR: 3.50, 95%CI: 1.40-8.77, P = 0.007). Conclusions: In our study, no evidence of person-to-person transmission was found in cured COVID-19 patients. There seemed to be no re-infection in the cured COVID-19 patients in Guangzhou. These finding suggest that the cured do not cause the spread of disease. Additionally, neither IgG nor IgM can be used to replace the PCR test in cured patients.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wang et al. as discussed by the authors found that combining with antipsychotics, non-antipsychotic medicines including benzodiazepines (OR = 3.13, 95%CI = 1.95-5.20, P < 0.001) and modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) were associated with a significantly increased incidence of HAP.
Abstract: Background Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) has a significant and detrimental impact on schizophrenia patients. Non-antipsychotic medicines and modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) are frequently used in conjunction with antipsychotics to treat schizophrenia. Whether non-antipsychotic medicines or MECT are risk factors for HAP in schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics is still unknown. Methods Patients with schizophrenia who were admitted to the Fourth People's Hospital of Chengdu between January 2015 and April 2022 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Individuals with HAP were 1:1 matched to individuals without HAP (non-HAP) using propensity score matching (PSM). The risk factors for HAP were analyzed by comparing the two groups. Results A total of 7,085 schizophrenia patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 39.77 ± 14.45 years. 193 patients developed HAP on an average of 22.26 ± 21.68 days after admission with an incidence of 2.73%. After 1:1 PSM, 192 patients from each group (HAP and non-HAP) were included. The HAP group had significantly more patients with MECT and taking benzodiazepines, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and anti-parkinsonians both before and after PSM by Bonferroni correction (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, combined with antipsychotics, non-antipsychotic medicines including benzodiazepines (OR = 3.13, 95%CI = 1.95-5.03, P < 0.001), mood stabilizers (OR =3.33, 95%CI =1.79–6.20, P < 0.001) and MECT (OR =2.58, 95%CI =1.49–4.46, P = 0.001) were associated with a significantly increased incidence of HAP. Conclusion The incidence of HAP in schizophrenia patients in our cohort was 2.73%. MECT and non-antipsychotic medicines, including benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers were risk factors for HAP in schizophrenia patients treated with antipsychotics.

1 citations