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Author

Yuma Endo

Bio: Yuma Endo is an academic researcher from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Optical fiber & Brillouin scattering. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 2 citations.

Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Nov 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, a two-frequency pump and probe light was used to enlarge the Brillouin gain spectrum to 2 MHz/℃ or 0.1 MHz/μe.
Abstract: Brillouin fiber optic sensing has been attracting much attention as one of the best ways of monitoring the temperature and/or strain distribution of large structures, such as bridges or pipelines. To detect abnormal sections of such structures at an earlier stage, improvement of measurement sensitivity is required. In the standard Brillouin fiber optic sensing, sensitivity given by the temperature or strain coefficient of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) is about 1 MHz/℃ or 0.05 MHz/μe, respectively. In this study, we introduce a new method utilizing two-frequency pump and probe light to enlarge these coefficients without using special fibers. In this method, Brillouin gain spectrum is measured by sweeping the two frequencies of probe light in the opposite directions, where the measured spectrum has two peaks. The separation between the two peaks linearly changes with BFS, and so it has a linear relation to temperature and strain of an optical fiber. Since the changing rate of the separation between the two peaks is twice as large as that of BFS, the temperature or strain sensitivity is doubled to 2 MHz/℃ or 0.1 MHz/μe. The enhanced sensitivity was experimentally confirmed in the proof-of-concept experiment.

1 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
16 May 2019
TL;DR: A strain measurement of an optical fiber using multimode stimulated Brillouin scattering is experimentally demonstrated, which shows sensitivity more than 1,000 times higher than the conventional methods based on single mode light.
Abstract: A strain measurement of an optical fiber using multimode stimulated Brillouin scattering is experimentally demonstrated, which shows sensitivity more than 1,000 times higher than the conventional methods based on single mode light.

1 citations


Cited by
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Nov 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, a two-frequency pump and probe light was used to enlarge the Brillouin gain spectrum to 2 MHz/℃ or 0.1 MHz/μe.
Abstract: Brillouin fiber optic sensing has been attracting much attention as one of the best ways of monitoring the temperature and/or strain distribution of large structures, such as bridges or pipelines. To detect abnormal sections of such structures at an earlier stage, improvement of measurement sensitivity is required. In the standard Brillouin fiber optic sensing, sensitivity given by the temperature or strain coefficient of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) is about 1 MHz/℃ or 0.05 MHz/μe, respectively. In this study, we introduce a new method utilizing two-frequency pump and probe light to enlarge these coefficients without using special fibers. In this method, Brillouin gain spectrum is measured by sweeping the two frequencies of probe light in the opposite directions, where the measured spectrum has two peaks. The separation between the two peaks linearly changes with BFS, and so it has a linear relation to temperature and strain of an optical fiber. Since the changing rate of the separation between the two peaks is twice as large as that of BFS, the temperature or strain sensitivity is doubled to 2 MHz/℃ or 0.1 MHz/μe. The enhanced sensitivity was experimentally confirmed in the proof-of-concept experiment.

1 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
09 May 2021
TL;DR: In this article, a slope assisted Brillouin optical time domain analysis using dual frequency probe light amplified by the gain and attenuated by the loss of BrillouIN loss is presented.
Abstract: We demonstrate a slope assisted Brillouin optical time domain analysis using dual frequency probe light amplified by Brillouin gain and attenuated by Brillouin loss, which generates linear output against temperature change.

1 citations