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Conference

International Conference on Global Software Engineering 

About: International Conference on Global Software Engineering is an academic conference. The conference publishes majorly in the area(s): Software development & Social software engineering. Over the lifetime, 550 publication(s) have been published by the conference receiving 9794 citation(s).


Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
13 Jul 2009
TL;DR: A systematic literature review of the primary studies that report using Scrum practices in GSD projects to identify various challenges and strategies available to deal with them is presented.
Abstract: There is a growing interest in applying agile practices in Global Software Development (GSD) projects. The literature on using Scrum, one of the most popular agile approaches, in distributed development projects has steadily been growing. However, there has not been any effort to systematically select, review, and synthesize the literature on this topic. We have conducted a systematic literature review of the primary studies that report using Scrum practices in GSD projects. Our search strategy identified 366 papers, of which 20 were identified as primary papers relevant to our research. We extracted data from these papers to identify various challenges of using Scrum in GSD. Current strategies to deal with the identified challenges have also been extracted. This paper presents the review’s findings that are expected to help researchers and practitioners to understand the challenges involved in using Scrum for GSD projects and the strategies available to deal with them.

313 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
16 Oct 2006
TL;DR: This study investigates the particular challenges associated with managing GSD by empirical investigation at three US based GSD companies operating in Ireland and reveals some of the solutions used to deal with these challenges.
Abstract: Global software development (GSD) is a phenomenon that is receiving considerable interest from companies all over the world. In GSD, stakeholders from different national and organizational cultures are involved in developing software and the many benefits include access to a large labour pool, cost advantage and round-the-clock development. However, GSD is technologically and organizationally complex and presents a variety of challenges to be managed by the software development team. In particular, temporal, geographical and socio-cultural distances impose problems not experienced in traditional systems development. In this paper, we present findings from a case study in which we explore the particular challenges associated with managing GSD. Our study also reveals some of the solutions that are used to deal with these challenges. We do so by empirical investigation at three US based GSD companies operating in Ireland. Based on qualitative interviews we present challenges related to temporal, geographical and socio-cultural distance.

305 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
27 Aug 2007
TL;DR: Observations show that organizational culture has an effect on how developers are made aware of changes related to the implementation of work items, and that communication-based social networks revolving around particular work items are dynamic throughout development, and therefore awareness needs to be maintained in infrastructures of work.
Abstract: Global software teams face challenges when collaborating over long distances, such as communicating changes in the project. During a four-month case study at IBM Ottawa Software Lab we observed the collaboration patterns of a multi-site development project team. In this period, we inspected project documentation, interviewed team leaders, attended project meetings, and spoke with developers to identify problems originated by the lack of awareness of changes related to the implementation of work items. Our observations show (1) that organizational culture has an effect on how developers are made aware; (2) that communication-based social networks revolving around particular work items are dynamic throughout development, and therefore awareness needs to be maintained in infrastructures of work; and (3) that information overload and communication breakdowns contributed to the generation of a broken integration build. We discuss these breakdowns in communication and implications for the design of collaboration tools that could mitigate these problems.

197 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Aug 2010
TL;DR: The analysis revealed that in most cases agile practices were modified with respect to the context and situational requirements, indicating the need for future research on how to integrate all experiences and practices in a way to assist practitioners when setting up non-collocated agile projects.
Abstract: This paper presents the results of systematically reviewing the current research literature on the use of agile practices and lean software development in global software engineering (GSE). The primary purpose is to highlight under which circumstances they have been applied efficiently. Some common terms related to agile practices (e.g. scrum, extreme programming) were considered in formulating the search strings, along with a number of alternatives for GSE such as offshoring, outsourcing, and virtual teams. The results were limited to peer-reviewed conference papers/journal articles, published between 1999 and 2009. The synthesis was made through classifying the papers into different categories (e.g. research type, distribution). The analysis revealed that in most cases agile practices were modified with respect to the context and situational requirements. This indicates the need for future research on how to integrate all experiences and practices in a way to assist practitioners when setting up non-collocated agile projects.

174 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
13 Jul 2009
TL;DR: Findings from a multiple case study on agile practices in two small and one mid-sized distributed Scrum project are presented, which describe how Scrum practices, such as daily scrums, backlogs, and sprints were successfully adopted to distributed development.
Abstract: Distributed agile development (DAD) has received increasing interest both in industry and academia as global software development (GSD) is becoming main-stream. However, agile methods and in particular agile practices have been designed for collocated software development, and are thus not directly applicable to DAD. In this paper, we present findings from a multiple case study on agile practices in two small and one mid-sized distributed Scrum project. Based on an interview study of 19 project team members, we describe how Scrum practices, such as daily scrums, backlogs, and sprints were successfully adopted to distributed development. We also describe supporting GSD practices employed, such as frequent visits and multiple communication modes that the projects used. Finally, we depict the challenges and benefits the case projects reported, as well as lessons learned from applying Scrum in distributed settings.

148 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Conference in previous years
YearPapers
202112
202019
201927
201825
201716
201643