Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format
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Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format
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Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format Example of Clinical Microbiology Reviews format
Sample paper formatted on SciSpace - SciSpace
This content is only for preview purposes. The original open access content can be found here.
open access Open Access
recommended Recommended

Clinical Microbiology Reviews — Template for authors

Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health #1 of 526 -
Microbiology (medical) #1 of 116 -
Infectious Diseases #2 of 288 -
Epidemiology #3 of 99 -
Immunology and Microbiology (all) #2 of 45 -
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 139 Published Papers | 5476 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 16/06/2020
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FAQ

Related Journals

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Journal Performance & Insights

Impact Factor

CiteRatio

Determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

22.556

27% from 2018

Impact factor for Clinical Microbiology Reviews from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 22.556
2018 17.75
2017 20.642
2016 19.958
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

39.4

18% from 2019

CiteRatio for Clinical Microbiology Reviews from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 39.4
2019 33.3
2018 39.5
2017 39.7
2016 35.8
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 27% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 18% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

9.177

6% from 2019

SJR for Clinical Microbiology Reviews from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 9.177
2019 8.664
2018 10.389
2017 11.301
2016 10.269
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

10.528

39% from 2019

SNIP for Clinical Microbiology Reviews from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 10.528
2019 7.57
2018 9.595
2017 9.25
2016 8.956
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 6% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 39% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Clinical Microbiology Reviews

Guideline source: View

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American Society for Microbiology

Clinical Microbiology Reviews

Clinical Microbiology Reviews (CMR) analyzes the latest developments in clinical microbiology and immunology. Key topics include pathogenic mechanisms, individual and groups of microbial pathogens, clinical and laboratory aspects of newly recognized and reemerging infectious d...... Read More

Epidemiology

Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Microbiology (medical)

Infectious Diseases

General Immunology and Microbiology

Medicine

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Last updated on
16 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0893-8512
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Impact Factor
Maximum - 10.101
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Open Access
Yes
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
unsrt asm custom citation
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Citation Type
Numbered
(25)
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Bibliography Example
Blonder, G. E., Tinkham, M., and Klapwijk, T. M. 1982. Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys. Rev. B, 25(7):4515–4532.

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1128/CMR.12.4.564
Plant Products as Antimicrobial Agents
Marjorie M. Cowan1

Abstract:

The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists, and natural-products chemists are combing the Earth for phytochemicals and “leads” which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. While 25 to 50% of cu... The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists, and natural-products chemists are combing the Earth for phytochemicals and “leads” which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. While 25 to 50% of current pharmaceuticals are derived from plants, none are used as antimicrobials. Traditional healers have long used plants to prevent or cure infectious conditions; Western medicine is trying to duplicate their successes. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites, such as tannins, terpenoids, alkaloids, and flavonoids, which have been found in vitro to have antimicrobial properties. This review attempts to summarize the current status of botanical screening efforts, as well as in vivo studies of their effectiveness and toxicity. The structure and antimicrobial properties of phytochemicals are also addressed. Since many of these compounds are currently available as unregulated botanical preparations and their use by the public is increasing rapidly, clinicians need to consider the consequences of patients self-medicating with these preparations. read more read less

Topics:

Antimicrobial (50%)50% related to the paper
6,996 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1128/CMR.15.2.167-193.2002
Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms
Rodney M. Donlan1, J. William Costerton2

Abstract:

Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Usi... Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes involved in cell attachment and biofilm formation. read more read less

Topics:

Biofilm matrix (69%)69% related to the paper, Biofilm (59%)59% related to the paper, Dispersin B (51%)51% related to the paper
5,246 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1128/CMR.11.1.142
Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli
James P. Nataro1, James B. Kaper1

Abstract:

Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least s... Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. read more read less

Topics:

Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (66%)66% related to the paper, Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (64%)64% related to the paper, Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (62%)62% related to the paper, Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (60%)60% related to the paper, Escherichia coli Vaccines (60%)60% related to the paper
4,674 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1128/CMR.12.1.147
Antiseptics and Disinfectants: Activity, Action, and Resistance
Gerald Mcdonnell, A. Denver Russell1

Abstract:

Antiseptics and disinfectants are extensively used in hospitals and other health care settings for a variety of topical and hard-surface applications A wide variety of active chemical agents (biocides) are found in these products, many of which have been used for hundreds of years, including alcohols, phenols, iodine, and chl... Antiseptics and disinfectants are extensively used in hospitals and other health care settings for a variety of topical and hard-surface applications A wide variety of active chemical agents (biocides) are found in these products, many of which have been used for hundreds of years, including alcohols, phenols, iodine, and chlorine Most of these active agents demonstrate broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity; however, little is known about the mode of action of these agents in comparison to antibiotics This review considers what is known about the mode of action and spectrum of activity of antiseptics and disinfectants The widespread use of these products has prompted some speculation on the development of microbial resistance, in particular whether antibiotic resistance is induced by antiseptics or disinfectants Known mechanisms of microbial resistance (both intrinsic and acquired) to biocides are reviewed, with emphasis on the clinical implications of these reports read more read less
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3,797 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1128/CMR.11.3.480
Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever
Duane J. Gubler1

Abstract:

Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic ... Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to devleop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever. read more read less

Topics:

2009 Bolivian dengue fever epidemic (75%)75% related to the paper, Dengue vaccine (71%)71% related to the paper, Dengue fever (71%)71% related to the paper, Dengue virus (66%)66% related to the paper, Flavivirus (54%)54% related to the paper
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3,706 Citations
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With SciSpace, you do not need a word template for Clinical Microbiology Reviews.

It automatically formats your research paper to American Society for Microbiology formatting guidelines and citation style.

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Clinical Microbiology Reviews format uses unsrt asm custom citation citation style.

Automatically format and order your citations and bibliography in a click.

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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write Clinical Microbiology Reviews in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Clinical Microbiology Reviews guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Clinical Microbiology Reviews guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Clinical Microbiology Reviews guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Clinical Microbiology Reviews?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Clinical Microbiology Reviews citation style.

4. Can I use the Clinical Microbiology Reviews templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Clinical Microbiology Reviews.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Clinical Microbiology Reviews that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Clinical Microbiology Reviews that you can download at the end.

6. How long does it usually take you to format my papers in Clinical Microbiology Reviews?

It only takes a matter of seconds to edit your manuscript. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves you from writing and formatting it in Clinical Microbiology Reviews.

7. Where can I find the template for the Clinical Microbiology Reviews?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Clinical Microbiology Reviews's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

8. Can I reformat my paper to fit the Clinical Microbiology Reviews's guidelines?

Of course! You can do this using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, our support team is always ready to assist you.

9. Clinical Microbiology Reviews an online tool or is there a desktop version?

SciSpace's Clinical Microbiology Reviews is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

10. I cannot find my template in your gallery. Can you create it for me like Clinical Microbiology Reviews?

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it setup within a few days. You can find the request box in Journal Gallery on the right side bar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for like Clinical Microbiology Reviews?”

11. What is the output that I would get after using Clinical Microbiology Reviews?

After writing your paper autoformatting in Clinical Microbiology Reviews, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Clinical Microbiology Reviews's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Clinical Microbiology Reviews?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Clinical Microbiology Reviews. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Clinical Microbiology Reviews?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Clinical Microbiology Reviews are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Clinical Microbiology Reviews?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Clinical Microbiology Reviews's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

16. Can I download Clinical Microbiology Reviews in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Clinical Microbiology Reviews Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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