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open access Open Access ISSN: 18715249

Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry — Template for authors

Publisher: Bentham Science
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology #36 of 60 down down by 1 rank
Neuroscience (all) #76 of 110 down down by 4 ranks
Molecular Medicine #123 of 167 up up by 3 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Medium
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 85 Published Papers | 253 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 08/07/2020
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.0

15% from 2019

CiteRatio for Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 3.0
2019 2.6
2018 2.6
2017 2.5
2016 3.0
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 15% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.427

58% from 2019

SJR for Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.427
2019 0.271
2018 0.351
2017 0.423
2016 0.49
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 58% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.755

103% from 2019

SNIP for Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.755
2019 0.372
2018 0.464
2017 0.496
2016 0.577
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 103% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 3010511 e-ISSN: 18736246

Elsevier

CiteRatio: 5.2 | SJR: 1.363 | SNIP: 1.148
open access Open Access ISSN: 485772 e-ISSN: 15405958 14698986
recommended Recommended

Wiley

CiteRatio: 6.4 | SJR: 1.661 | SNIP: 1.567
open access Open Access ISSN: 1678760 e-ISSN: 18727697

Elsevier

CiteRatio: 4.4 | SJR: 0.991 | SNIP: 1.065
open access Open Access ISSN: 14737175 e-ISSN: 17448360

Taylor and Francis

CiteRatio: 6.4 | SJR: 1.187 | SNIP: 1.192
Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry

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Bentham Science

Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry

Approved by publishing and review experts on SciSpace, this template is built as per for Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry formatting guidelines as mentioned in Bentham Science author instructions. The current version was created on 08 Jul 2020 and has been used by 969 authors to write and format their manuscripts to this journal.

Psychology

i
Last updated on
08 Jul 2020
i
ISSN
1871-5249
i
Impact Factor
Medium - 0.777
i
Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
Vancouver
i
Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
i
Bibliography Example
Blonder, G E, Tinkham, M, & Klapwijk, T M. Transition from metallic to tunnel- ing regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys. Rev. B. 2013;87(10):100510.

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/187152411796011303
Astrocytes: targets for neuroprotection in stroke.
George E. Barreto1, Robin E. White, Yi-Bing Ouyang, Lijun Xu, Rona G. Giffard1

Abstract:

In the past two decades, over 1000 clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a benefit in treating stroke, with the exception of thrombolytics. Although many targets have been pursued, including antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, glutamate receptor blockers, and neurotrophic factors, often the focus has been on neuronal... In the past two decades, over 1000 clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a benefit in treating stroke, with the exception of thrombolytics. Although many targets have been pursued, including antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, glutamate receptor blockers, and neurotrophic factors, often the focus has been on neuronal mechanisms of injury. Broader attention to loss and dysfunction of non-neuronal cell types is now required to increase the chance of success. Of the several glial cell types, this review will focus on astrocytes. Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the higher mammalian nervous system, and they play key roles in normal CNS physiology and in central nervous system injury and pathology. In the setting of ischemia astrocytes perform multiple functions, some beneficial and some potentially detrimental, making them excellent candidates as therapeutic targets to improve outcome following stroke and in other central nervous system injuries. The older neurocentric view of the central nervous system has changed radically with the growing understanding of the many essential functions of astrocytes. These include K+ buffering, glutamate clearance, brain antioxidant defense, close metabolic coupling with neurons, and modulation of neuronal excitability. In this review, we will focus on those functions of astrocytes that can both protect and endanger neurons, and discuss how manipulating these functions provides a novel and important strategy to enhance neuronal survival and improve outcome following cerebral ischemia. read more read less

Topics:

Neuroprotection (57%)57% related to the paper, Neurotrophic factors (55%)55% related to the paper, Glutamate receptor (52%)52% related to the paper, Central nervous system (50%)50% related to the paper
240 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/1871524911006030238
Scientific Basis for the Use of Indian Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: 1. Ashwagandha
M.R. Ven Murthy1, Prabhakar K. Ranjekar, Charles Ramassamy, Manasi Deshpande

Abstract:

Ayurveda is a Sanskrit word, which means "the scripture for longevity". It represents an ancient system of traditional medicine prevalent in India and in several other south Asian countries. It is based on a holistic view of treatment which is believed to cure human diseases through establishment of equilibrium in the differe... Ayurveda is a Sanskrit word, which means "the scripture for longevity". It represents an ancient system of traditional medicine prevalent in India and in several other south Asian countries. It is based on a holistic view of treatment which is believed to cure human diseases through establishment of equilibrium in the different elements of human life, the body, the mind, the intellect and the soul [1]. Ayurveda dates back to the period of the Indus Valley civilization (about 3000 B.C) and has been passed on through generations of oral tradition, like the other four sacred texts (Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samaveda and Atharvanaveda) which were composed between 12(th) and 7(th) century B.C [2, 3]. References to the herbal medicines of Ayurveda are found in all of the other four Vedas, suggesting that Ayurveda predates the other Vedas by at least several centuries. It was already in full practice at the time of Buddha (6(th) century B.C) and had produced two of the greatest physicians of ancient India, Charaka and Shushrutha who composed the basic texts of their trade, the Samhitas. By this time, ayurveda had already developed eight different subspecialties of medical treatment, named Ashtanga, which included surgery, internal medicine, ENT, pediatrics, toxicology, health and longevity, and spiritual healing [4]. Ayurvedic medicine was mainly composed of herbal preparations which were occasionally combined with different levels of other compounds, as supplements [5]. In the Ayurvedic system, the herbs used for medicinal purposes are classed as brain tonics or rejuvenators. Among the plants most often used in Ayurveda are, in the descending order of importance: (a) Ashwagandha, (b) Brahmi, (c) Jatamansi, (d) Jyotishmati, (e) Mandukparni, (f) Shankhapushpi, and (g) Vacha. The general appearance of these seven plants is shown in Fig.1. Their corresponding Latin names, as employed in current scientific literature, the botanical families that each of them belongs to, their normal habitats in different areas of the world, as well as the common synonyms by which they are known, are shown in the Table 1. The scientific investigations concerning the best known and most scientifically investigated of these herbs, Ashwagandha will be discussed in detail in this review. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera, WS), also commonly known, in different parts of the world, as Indian ginseng, Winter cherry, Ajagandha, Kanaje Hindi and Samm Al Ferakh, is a plant belonging to the Solanaceae family. It is also known in different linguistic areas in India by its local vernacular names [6]. It grows prolifically in dry regions of South Asia, Central Asia and Africa, particularly in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, South Africa, Egypt, Morocco, Congo and Jordon [7]. In India, it is cultivated, on a commercial scale, in the states of Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Gujarat and Rajasthan [6]. In Sanskrit, ashwagandha, the Indian name for WS, means "odor of the horse", probably originating from the odor of its root which resembles that of a sweaty horse. The name"somnifera" in Latin means "sleep-inducer" which probably refers to its extensive use as a remedy against stress from a variety of daily chores. Some herbalists refer to ashwagandha as Indian ginseng, since it is used in India, in a way similar to how ginseng is used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a large variety of human diseases [8]. Ashwagandha is a shrub whose various parts (berries, leaves and roots) have been used by Ayurvedic practitioners as folk remedies, or as aphrodisiacs and diuretics. The fresh roots are sometimes boiled in milk, in order to leach out undesirable constituents. The berries are sometimes used as a substitute to coagulate milk in cheese making. In Ayurveda, the herbal preparation is referred to as a "rasayana", an elixir that works, in a nonspecific, global fashion, to increase human health and longevity. It is also considered an adaptogen, a nontoxic medication that normalizes physiological functions, disturbed by chronic stress, through correction of imbalances in the neuroendocrine and immune systems [9, 10]. The scientific research that has been carried out on Ashwagandha and other ayurvedic herbal medicines may be classified into three major categories, taking into consideration the endogenous or exogenous phenomena that are known to cause physiological disequilibrium leading to the pathological state; (A) pharmacological and therapeutic effects of extracts, purified compounds or multi-herbal mixtures on specific non-neurological diseases; (B) pharmacological and therapeutic effects of extracts, purified compounds or multi-herbal mixtures on neurodegenerative disorders; and (C) biochemical, physiological and genetic studies on the herbal plants themselves, in order to distinguish between those originating from different habitats, or to improve the known medicinal quality of the indigenous plant. Some of the major points on its use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are described below. read more read less

Topics:

Medicinal plants (51%)51% related to the paper
128 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/1871524911006030207
The Dual Role of Serotonin in Defense and the Mode of Action of Antidepressants on Generalized Anxiety and Panic Disorders

Abstract:

Antidepressants are widely used to treat several anxiety disorders, among which generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder (PD). Serotonin (5-HT) is believed to play a key role in the mode of action of these agents, a major question being which pathways and receptor subtypes are involved in each type of anxiety dis... Antidepressants are widely used to treat several anxiety disorders, among which generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder (PD). Serotonin (5-HT) is believed to play a key role in the mode of action of these agents, a major question being which pathways and receptor subtypes are involved in each type of anxiety disorder. The dual role of 5-HT in defense hypothesis assumes that 5-HT facilitates defensive responses to potential threat, like inhibitory avoidance, related to anxiety, whereas it inhibits defensive responses to proximal danger, like one-way escape, related to panic. The former action would be exerted at the forebrain, chiefly the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), while the latter would be exerted at the dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) matter of the midbrain. The present review is focused on studies designed to test this hypothesis, performed in animal models of anxiety and panic, as well as in human experimental anxiety tests. The reviewed results suggest that chronic, but not acute, administration of antidepressants suppress panic attacks by increasing the release of 5-HT and enhancing the responsivity of post-synaptic 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the DPAG. The attenuation of generalized anxiety, also caused by the same drug treatment, would be due to the desensitization of 5-HT2C receptors and, less certainly, to increased stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors in forebrain structures. This action would result in less activation of the amygdala, medial PFC and insula by warning signals, as shown by the reviewed results obtained with functional neuroimaging in healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety disorders. read more read less

Topics:

Anxiety disorder (71%)71% related to the paper, Panic disorder (66%)66% related to the paper, Anxiety (66%)66% related to the paper, Generalized anxiety disorder (64%)64% related to the paper, Panic (60%)60% related to the paper
109 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/187152409787601932
Mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain.

Abstract:

Neuropathic pain (pain associated with lesions or dysfunction of nervous system) is relatively common, occurring in about 1% of the population. Studies in animal models describe a number of peripheral and central pathophysiological processes after nerve injury that would be the basis of underlying neuropathic pain mechanism. ... Neuropathic pain (pain associated with lesions or dysfunction of nervous system) is relatively common, occurring in about 1% of the population. Studies in animal models describe a number of peripheral and central pathophysiological processes after nerve injury that would be the basis of underlying neuropathic pain mechanism. A change in function, chemistry, and structures of neurons (neural plasticity) underlie the production of the altered sensitivity characteristics of neuropathic pain. Peripheral sensitization acts on the nociceptors, and central sensitization takes place at various levels ranging from the dorsal horn to the brain. In addition, abnormal interactions between the sympathetic and sensory pathways contribute to mechanisms mediating neuropathic pain. Despite recent advances in identification of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms related to nervous system injury, the effective treatment of patients suffering from neuropathic pain remains a clinical challenge. Although numerous treatment options are available for relieving neuropathic pain, there is no consensus on the most appropriate treatment. However, recommendations can be proposed for first-line, second-line, and third-line pharmacological treatments based on the level of evidence for the different treatment strategies. Beside opioids, the available therapies shown to be effective in managing neuropathic pain include anticonvulsants, antidepressants, topical treatments (lidocaine patch, capsaicin), and ketamine. Tricyclic antidepressants are often the first drugs selected to alleviate neuropathic pain (first-line pharmacological treatment). Although they are very effective in reducing pain in several neuropathic pain disorders, treatment may be compromised (and outweighed) by their side effects. In patients with a history of cardiovascular disorders, glaucoma, and urine retention, pregabalin and gabapentine are emerging as first-line treatment for neuropathic pain. In addition these anti-epileptic drugs have a favourable safety profile with minimal concerns regarding drug interactions and showing no interference with hepatic enzymes. Despite the numerous treatment options available for relieving neuropathic pain, the most appropriate treatment strategy is only able to reduce pain in 70% of these patients. In the remaining patients, combination therapies using two or more analgesics with different mechanisms of action may also offer adequate pain relief. Although combination treatment is clinical practice and may result in greater pain relief, trials regarding different combinations of analgesics are lacking (which combination to use, occurrence of additive or supra-additive effects, sequential or concurrent treatment, adverse-event profiles of these analgesics, alone and in combination) are lacking. Additionally, 10% of patients still experience intractable pain and are refractory to all forms of pharmacotherapy. If medical treatments fail, invasive therapies such as intrathecal drug administration and neurosurgical interventions may be considered. read more read less

Topics:

Neuropathic pain (65%)65% related to the paper, Intractable pain (61%)61% related to the paper, Threshold of pain (59%)59% related to the paper, Pregabalin (58%)58% related to the paper, Neuralgia (51%)51% related to the paper
107 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/1871524910909030184
Sigma-1 receptor chaperones and diseases
Shang-Yi Tsai1, Teruo Hayashi, Tomohisa Mori, Tsung-Ping Su

Abstract:

Chaperones are proteins that assist the correct folding of other protein clients either when the clients are being synthesized or at their functional localities. Chaperones are responsible for certain diseases. The sigma-1 receptor is recently identified as a receptor chaperone whose activity can be activated/deactivated by s... Chaperones are proteins that assist the correct folding of other protein clients either when the clients are being synthesized or at their functional localities. Chaperones are responsible for certain diseases. The sigma-1 receptor is recently identified as a receptor chaperone whose activity can be activated/deactivated by specific ligands. Under physiological conditions, the sigma-1 receptor chaperones the functional IP3 receptor at the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrion interface to ensure proper Ca2+ signaling from endoplasmic reticulum into mitochondrion. However, under pathological conditions whereby cells encounter enormous stress that results in the endoplasmic reticulum losing its global Ca2+ homeostasis, the sigma-1 receptor translocates and counteracts the arising apoptosis. Thus, the sigma-1 receptor is a receptor chaperone essential for the metabotropic receptor signaling and for the survival against cellular stress. The sigma-1 receptor has been implicated in many diseases including addiction, pain, depression, stroke, and cancer. Whether the chaperone activity of the sigma-1 receptor attributes to those diseases awaits further investigation. read more read less

Topics:

Sigma-1 receptor (67%)67% related to the paper, 5-HT5A receptor (60%)60% related to the paper, Protease-activated receptor 2 (59%)59% related to the paper, Chaperone (protein) (59%)59% related to the paper, STIM1 (59%)59% related to the paper
101 Citations
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