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Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format Example of Acupuncture in Medicine format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 9645284 e-ISSN: 17599873

Acupuncture in Medicine — Template for authors

Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Complementary and Alternative Medicine #19 of 86 down down by 2 ranks
Neurology (clinical) #163 of 343 down down by 15 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 186 Published Papers | 695 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 06/07/2020
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

2.129

19% from 2018

Impact factor for Acupuncture in Medicine from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 2.129
2018 2.637
2017 2.275
2016 2.156
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 19% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.7

8% from 2019

CiteRatio for Acupuncture in Medicine from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 3.7
2019 4.0
2018 3.6
2017 3.3
2016 2.9
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has decreased by 8% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.62

24% from 2019

SJR for Acupuncture in Medicine from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.62
2019 0.82
2018 0.857
2017 0.702
2016 0.574
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 24% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.076

8% from 2019

SNIP for Acupuncture in Medicine from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.076
2019 1.17
2018 0.901
2017 0.865
2016 0.825
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 8% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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CiteRatio: 4.8 | SJR: 0.972 | SNIP: 1.782
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CiteRatio: 4.0 | SJR: 0.73 | SNIP: 0.924
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Acupuncture in Medicine

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BMJ Publishing Group

Acupuncture in Medicine

Acupuncture in Medicine is a bi-monthly scientific and clinical journal aimed at Western-trained physicians and other health professionals, and uses the prevailing understanding of neurophysiology and anatomy to interpret the effects of acupuncture. The Journal largely restric...... Read More

Medicine

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Last updated on
05 Jul 2020
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ISSN
0964-5284
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Impact Factor
Medium - 0.946
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Acceptance Rate
61%
i
Open Access
Yes
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
unsrt
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
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Bibliography Example
C. W. J. Beenakker. Specular andreev reflection in graphene. Phys. Rev. Lett., 97(6):067007, 2006.

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/AIM.22.4.178
Biomechanics of back pain
Michael A. Adams1
01 Dec 2004 - Acupuncture in Medicine

Abstract:

This paper offers a mechanistic account of back pain which attempts to incorporate all of the most important recent advances in spinal research. Anatomical and pain-provocation studies show that severe and chronic back pain most often originates in the lumbar intervertebral discs, the apophyseal joints, and the sacroiliac joi... This paper offers a mechanistic account of back pain which attempts to incorporate all of the most important recent advances in spinal research. Anatomical and pain-provocation studies show that severe and chronic back pain most often originates in the lumbar intervertebral discs, the apophyseal joints, and the sacroiliac joints. Psychosocial factors influence many aspects of back pain behaviour but they are not important determinants of who will experience back pain in the first place. Back pain is closely (but not invariably) associated with structural pathology such as intervertebral disc prolapse and endplate fractures, although age-related biochemical changes such as those revealed by a 'dark disc' on MRI have little clinical relevance. All features of structural pathology (including disc prolapse) can be re-created in cadaveric specimens by severe or repetitive mechanical loading, with a combination of bending and compression being particularly harmful to the spine. Structural disruption alters the mechanical environment of disc cells in a manner that leads to cell-mediated degenerative changes, and animal experiments confirm that surgical disruption of a disc is followed by widespread disc degeneration. Some people are more vulnerable to spinal degeneration than others, largely because of their genetic inheritance. Age-related biochemical changes and loading history can also affect tissue vulnerability. Finally the concept of 'functional pathology' is introduced, according to which, back pain can arise because postural habits generate painful stress concentrations within innervated tissues, even though the stresses are not high enough to cause physical disruption. read more read less

Topics:

Back pain (67%)67% related to the paper, Lumbar (50%)50% related to the paper
428 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/AIM.22.3.122
A cumulative review of the range and incidence of significant adverse events associated with acupuncture.
01 Sep 2004 - Acupuncture in Medicine

Abstract:

Objective To summarise the range and frequency of significant adverse events associated with acupuncture in order to provide evidence on which to base continuing efforts to improve the safety of acupuncture practice. Methods Searches were conducted of computerised databases, previous reviews of case reports, population survey... Objective To summarise the range and frequency of significant adverse events associated with acupuncture in order to provide evidence on which to base continuing efforts to improve the safety of acupuncture practice. Methods Searches were conducted of computerised databases, previous reviews of case reports, population surveys, prospective surveys of acupuncture practice and relevant sections of textbooks for primary and secondary reports to indicate the range of significant adverse events associated with acupuncture. Data from prospective surveys of acupuncture were combined to estimate the incidence of serious adverse events. Results A total of 715 adverse events was included. There were 90 primary reports of trauma, and 186 secondary reports; the most common were pneumothorax and injury to the central nervous system. Infection accounted for 204 primary reports and 91 secondary reports. Over 60% of these cases were hepatitis B. The next most common infection was of the external ear, as a complication of auricular acupuncture. The 144 miscellaneous events mainly comprised seizures and drowsiness judged severe enough to cause a traffic hazard. There were 12 primary reports of deaths. According to the evidence from 12 prospective studies which surveyed more than a million treatments, the risk of a serious adverse event with acupuncture is estimated to be 0.05 per 10 000 treatments, and 0.55 per 10 000 individual patients. Conclusions The risk of serious events occurring in association with acupuncture is very low, below that of many common medical treatments. The range of adverse events reported is wide and some events, specifically trauma and some episodes of infection, are likely to be avoidable. read more read less

Topics:

Acupuncture (56%)56% related to the paper, Adverse effect (51%)51% related to the paper, Population (51%)51% related to the paper
View PDF
320 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/AIM.20.4.168
Validating a new non-penetrating sham acupuncture device: two randomised controlled trials
Jongbae Park1, Adrian White1, Clare Stevinson1, Edzard Ernst1, Martin A. James2
01 Dec 2002 - Acupuncture in Medicine

Abstract:

For clinical trials of acupuncture, it would be desirable to have a sham procedure that is indistinguishable from the real treatment, yet inactive. A sham needle has been designed which telescopes instead of penetrating the skin. The Park Sham Device involves an improved method of supporting the sham needle and requires valid... For clinical trials of acupuncture, it would be desirable to have a sham procedure that is indistinguishable from the real treatment, yet inactive. A sham needle has been designed which telescopes instead of penetrating the skin. The Park Sham Device involves an improved method of supporting the sham needle and requires validation. The objective of these studies was to test whether the sham procedure using the new device was 1) indistinguishable from the same procedure using real needles in acupuncture naive subjects, and 2) inactive, where the specific needle sensation (de qi) is taken as a surrogate measure of activity. The studies were designed as subject and assessor blind, randomised controlled trials. Study 1) included 58 patients enrolled in a clinical trial of acupuncture for acute stroke. Study 2) included 63 healthy, acupuncture naive, adult volunteers. The interventions used were real or sham acupuncture using the Park Sham Device. Study 1) was set in a district general hospital, and study 2) in a university laboratory. The outcome measure in study 1) was the form of treatment that patients believed they had received. In study 2) the outcome measure was experience of de qi, as judged by three acupuncture experts. No patient in either group(study 1) believed he or she had been treated with the sham needle. In 40 volunteers (study 2) for whom experts achieved consensus, the relative risk of experiencing de qi with real acupuncture to that with sham acupuncture was 15.38 (95% CI 2.26 to 104.86). The inter-rater reliability of all 13 experts (study 2), calculated from their judgements on 10 subjects selected by randomisation, was 0.52 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.61). In conclusion, the results suggest that the procedure using the new device is indistinguishable from the same procedure using real needles in acupuncture naive subjects, and is inactive, where the specific needle sensation (de qi) is taken as a surrogate measure of activity. It is therefore a valid control for acupuncture trials. The findings also lend support to the existence of de qi, a major concept underlying traditional Chinese acupuncture. read more read less

Topics:

Acupuncture (58%)58% related to the paper
273 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/AIM.24.1.13
Are minimal, superficial or sham acupuncture procedures acceptable as inert placebo controls?
Iréne Lund1, Thomas Lundeberg
01 Mar 2006 - Acupuncture in Medicine

Abstract:

Most controlled trials of acupuncture have used minimal, superficial, sham, or 'placebo' acupuncture. It has recently been demonstrated that light touch of the skin stimulates mechanoreceptors coupled to slow conducting unmyelinated (C) afferents resulting in activity in the insular region, but not in the somatosensory cortex... Most controlled trials of acupuncture have used minimal, superficial, sham, or 'placebo' acupuncture. It has recently been demonstrated that light touch of the skin stimulates mechanoreceptors coupled to slow conducting unmyelinated (C) afferents resulting in activity in the insular region, but not in the somatosensory cortex. Activity in these C tactile afferents has been suggested to induce a 'limbic touch' response resulting in emotional and hormonal reactions. It is likely that, in many acupuncture studies, control procedures that are meant to be inert are in fact activating these C tactile afferents and consequently result in the alleviation of the affective component of pain. This could explain why control interventions are equally effective as acupuncture in alleviating pain conditions that are predominantly associated with affective components such as migraine or low back pain, but not those with a more pronounced sensory component, such as osteoarthritis of the knee or lateral epicondylalgia. read more read less

Topics:

Acupuncture (56%)56% related to the paper
262 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/AIM.20.2-3.82
Acupuncture mechanisms for clinically relevant long-term effects--reconsideration and a hypothesis
Christer Carlsson1
01 Aug 2002 - Acupuncture in Medicine

Abstract:

From the author's direct involvement in clinical research, the conclusion has been drawn that clinically relevant long-term pain relieving effects of acupuncture (>6 months) can be seen in a proportion of patients with nociceptive pain. The mechanisms behind such effects are considered in this paper. From the existing experim... From the author's direct involvement in clinical research, the conclusion has been drawn that clinically relevant long-term pain relieving effects of acupuncture (>6 months) can be seen in a proportion of patients with nociceptive pain. The mechanisms behind such effects are considered in this paper. From the existing experimental data some important conclusions can be drawn: 1. Much of the animal research only represents short-term hypoalgesia probably induced by the mechanisms behind stress-induced analgesia (SIA) and the activation of diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC). 2. Almost all experimental acupuncture research has been performed with electro-acupuncture (EA) even though therapeutic acupuncture is mostly gentle manual acupuncture (MA). 3. Most of the experimental human acupuncture pain threshold (PT) research shows only fast and very short-term hypoalgesia, and, importantly, PT elevation in humans does not predict the clinical outcome. 4. The effects of acupuncture may be divided into two main components--acupuncture analgesia and therapeutic acupuncture. A hypothesis on the mechanisms of therapeutic acupuncture will include: 1. Peripheral events that might improve tissue healing and give rise to local pain relief through axon reflexes, the release of neuropeptides with trophic effects, dichotomising nerve fibres and local endorphins. 2. Spinal mechanisms, for example, gate-control, long-term depression, propriospinal inhibition and the balance between long-term depression and long-term potentiation. 3. Supraspinal mechanisms through the descending pain inhibitory system, DNIC, the sympathetic nervous system and the HPA-axis. Is oxytocin also involved in the long-term effects? 4. Cortical, psychological, "placebo" mechanisms from counselling, reassurance and anxiety reduction. read more read less

Topics:

Acupuncture (59%)59% related to the paper, Diffuse noxious inhibitory control (57%)57% related to the paper, Threshold of pain (54%)54% related to the paper, Hypoalgesia (53%)53% related to the paper
207 Citations
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SHERPA/RoMEO Database

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RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
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