Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format
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Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format
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Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format Example of European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 20479956 e-ISSN: 20479964

European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy — Template for authors

Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Pharmacy #15 of 35 down down by None rank
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 262 Published Papers | 428 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 17/07/2020
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

0.892

24% from 2018

Impact factor for European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 0.892
2018 0.717
2017 0.538
2016 0.718
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 24% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

1.6

33% from 2019

CiteRatio for European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.6
2019 1.2
2018 1.2
2017 1.0
2016 1.0
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 33% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.313

11% from 2019

SJR for European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.313
2019 0.283
2018 0.275
2017 0.213
2016 0.312
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 11% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.594

13% from 2019

SNIP for European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.594
2019 0.526
2018 0.552
2017 0.355
2016 0.534
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 13% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 22107703 e-ISSN: 22107711

Springer

CiteRatio: 2.7 | SJR: 0.538 | SNIP: 0.974
open access Open Access ISSN: 20951779
recommended Recommended

Elsevier

CiteRatio: 8.3 | SJR: 0.786 | SNIP: 1.529
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy

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BMJ Publishing Group

European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy

European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy (EJHP) is the only official journal of the European Association of Hospital Pharmacists (EAHP) and is committed to advancing the science, practice and profession of hospital pharmacy. As the premier communication platform for European hosp...... Read More

Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics

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Last updated on
17 Jul 2020
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ISSN
2047-9956
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Impact Factor
Low - 0.183
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Acceptance Rate
59%
i
Open Access
Yes
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
unsrt
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
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Bibliography Example
C. W. J. Beenakker. Specular andreev reflection in graphene. Phys. Rev. Lett., 97(6):067007, 2006.

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/EJHPHARM-2012-000074.356
STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment) as a pharmacy service

Abstract:

Background In 2009 National Quality Standards for Residential Care Settings for Older people in Ireland were written into Irish legislation by the Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA). Standard 15 specifically states that each resident on long-term medication in the Residential Care Setting should be reviewed by hi... Background In 2009 National Quality Standards for Residential Care Settings for Older people in Ireland were written into Irish legislation by the Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA). Standard 15 specifically states that each resident on long-term medication in the Residential Care Setting should be reviewed by his/her medical practitioner on a three monthly basis, in conjunction with nursing staff and the pharmacist. Purpose Implementation of STOPP and START 1 as a clinical pharmacy service to facilitate three monthly medication reviews in an older residential care setting. Qualitative evaluation of the acceptability of the service to General Practitioners. Materials and methods A total of 103 residents ≥65 years from two residential care units were eligible for inclusion (exclusion criteria included terminally ill or respite patients) in the study and six General Practitioners participated in the study. Each General Practitioner completed a qualitative post service evaluation interview to determine the acceptability of STOPP and START 1 as a clinical pharmacy service. Results Of the residents reviewed (n=103), 75 (72.8%) were female; the median age was 86 years (IQR: 66-103). 884 regular medicines were prescribed (Median 9). 75.7% (78) residents had at least one potentially inappropriate medicine (PIM) or prescribing omission identified by STOPP and START criteria 1 . 65% of potentially inappropriate prescribing involved use of medicines that had unfavourable risk benefit ratio according to STOPP and 34.8% were instances of PIM through omission of potentially beneficial medicine according to START. 46.6% (95) of recommendations were accepted and implemented by General Practitioners. Of all recommendations declined a valid reason was provided in 93.5% (102) of cases. All General Practitioners interviewed found STOPP/START 1 to be acceptable as a clinical pharmacy service. Conclusions Implementation of STOPP and START 1 as a clinical pharmacy service reduces inappropriate prescribing, facilitates the three monthly medication reviews required to meet HIQA9s medication monitoring and review standard and is acceptable to General Practitioners. read more read less

Topics:

Pharmacist (59%)59% related to the paper, Clinical pharmacy (59%)59% related to the paper, Pharmacy (52%)52% related to the paper, Medical prescription (50%)50% related to the paper
View PDF
55 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/EJHPHARM-2014-000486
Pharmacist prescribing within a UK NHS hospital trust: nature and extent of prescribing, and prevalence of errors
Wasim Baqir1, Olga Crehan1, Richard Murray1, David Campbell1, Richard Copeland1

Abstract:

Objectives Suitably qualified pharmacists in the UK are able to prescribe all medicines. While doctors’ prescribing errors are well documented, there is little information on the rate and nature of pharmacists’ prescribing errors. Our aim was to measure the prevalence of prescribing errors by pharmacists. Methods Prescribing ... Objectives Suitably qualified pharmacists in the UK are able to prescribe all medicines. While doctors’ prescribing errors are well documented, there is little information on the rate and nature of pharmacists’ prescribing errors. Our aim was to measure the prevalence of prescribing errors by pharmacists. Methods Prescribing by pharmacists, for inpatients admitted to three hospitals in North East England was studied. Part one measured the extent of prescribing by pharmacists as a proportion of all prescribing on a single day. The number of medication orders, reason for prescribing and therapeutic category were collected by the researcher (OC). In part two, pharmacist prescribing was reviewed for safety and accuracy by ward-based clinical pharmacists over 10 days; errors were documented and categorised as per EQUIP study. Results Part 1: Pharmacists prescribed one or more medication orders for 182 (39.8%) of 457 patients, accounting for 12.9% (680 from 5274) of all medication orders prescribed on a single census day. Pharmacists prescribed medicines from 12 out of 15 British National Formulary categories (no prescribing of drugs used in malignancy, immunology and anaesthetics). Part 2: 1415 pharmacist-prescribed medication orders were checked by clinical pharmacists, with four errors (0.3%) reported. Conclusions This study suggests that prescribing pharmacists can provide a valuable role in safely prescribing for a broad range of inpatients in UK general hospitals. read more read less

Topics:

Clinical pharmacy (60%)60% related to the paper, Formulary (52%)52% related to the paper
View PDF
39 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/EJHPHARM-2015-000664
A pilot survey of junior doctors' attitudes and awareness around medication review: time to change our educational approach?

Abstract:

Objectives Our aim was to explore junior doctors’ attitudes and awareness around concepts related to medication review, in order to find ways to change the culture for reviewing, altering and stopping inappropriate or unnecessary medicines. Having already demonstrated the value of team working with senior doctors and pharmaci... Objectives Our aim was to explore junior doctors’ attitudes and awareness around concepts related to medication review, in order to find ways to change the culture for reviewing, altering and stopping inappropriate or unnecessary medicines. Having already demonstrated the value of team working with senior doctors and pharmacists and the use of a medication review tool, we are now looking to engage first year clinicians and undergraduates in the process. Method An online survey about medication review was distributed among all 42 foundation year one (FY1) doctors at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in November 2014. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis. Results Twenty doctors completed the survey (48%). Of those, 17 believed that it was the pharmacist’s duty to review medicines; and 15 of 20 stated the general practitioner (GP). Sixteen of 20 stated that they would consult a senior doctor first before stopping medication. Eighteen of 20 considered the GP and consultant to be responsible for alterations, rather than themselves. Sixteen of 20 respondents were not aware of the availability of a medication review tool. Seventeen of 20 felt that more support from senior staff would help them become involved with medication review. Conclusions Junior doctors report feeling uncomfortable altering mediations without consulting a senior first. They appear to be building confidence with prescribing in their first year but not about the medication review process or questioning the drugs already prescribed. Consideration should be given to what we have termed a ‘bottom-up’ educational approach to provide early experience of and change the culture around medication review, to include the education of undergraduate and foundation doctors and pharmacists. read more read less

Topics:

Deprescribing (55%)55% related to the paper, Pharmacist (53%)53% related to the paper
View PDF
36 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/EJHPHARM-2016-000967
Deprescribing: a primary care perspective
Polly Duncan1, Martin Duerden2, Rupert Payne1

Abstract:

Polypharmacy is an increasing and global issue affecting primary care. Although sometimes appropriate, polypharmacy can also be problematic, leading to a range of adverse consequences. Deprescribing is the process of supervised withdrawal of an inappropriate medication and has the potential to reduce some of the problems asso... Polypharmacy is an increasing and global issue affecting primary care. Although sometimes appropriate, polypharmacy can also be problematic, leading to a range of adverse consequences. Deprescribing is the process of supervised withdrawal of an inappropriate medication and has the potential to reduce some of the problems associated with polypharmacy. It is a complex and sensitive process. We examine the issue of deprescribing from the perspective of primary care. Key steps in the deprescribing process are a review of medications and corresponding indications, consideration of harms, assessment of eligibility for discontinuation, prioritisation of medications and implementation of a stopping plan with appropriate monitoring. Patient involvement is a key feature of this process. Deprescribing should be considered in the context of end-of-life care and medication safety, but approaches are also required to identify other situations where deprescribing is appropriate. General practitioners are well positioned to facilitate deprescribing, usually through formal medication review, with decisions informed by a range of other healthcare professionals. Guidelines are available that help guide these processes. A range of studies have explored attitudes towards deprescribing; patients are generally supportive of the concept, although clinician views are varied. The successful implementation of deprescribing strategies still requires important patient and clinician barriers to be overcome, and clinical trial evidence of effectiveness and safety is essential. read more read less

Topics:

Deprescribing (85%)85% related to the paper, Beers Criteria (63%)63% related to the paper, Polypharmacy (56%)56% related to the paper
View PDF
36 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/EJHPHARM-2012-000074.203
An alternative treatment for Candida infections with Nigella sativa extracts

Abstract:

Background Nigella sativa is a herb from the Mediterranean region with antidiabetic, bronchodilator, antioxidant, hepatoprotective, lipid lowering, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Purpose This study aimed to reveal the antifungal activity of aqueous, methanolic and chloroform extracts obtained from the plant seeds... Background Nigella sativa is a herb from the Mediterranean region with antidiabetic, bronchodilator, antioxidant, hepatoprotective, lipid lowering, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Purpose This study aimed to reveal the antifungal activity of aqueous, methanolic and chloroform extracts obtained from the plant seeds, compared with the effect of traditional antifungals. Materials and methods Using standard mycological diagnostic methodology The authors isolated and identified 20 strains of Candida albicans from pathological products collected from patients hospitalised in different departments of the Craiova Emergency Hospital. Aqueous, methanolic and chloroform extracts were made from the seeds of Nigella sativa, in decreasing dilutions, in which Wattman filter paper discs were soaked and dried and then used to achieve the antifungal graph by using the Kirby-Bauer diffusion technique. Simultaneously, the testing was repeated using standard antifungal disks (Becton Dickinson) and the two sets of results compared. The antifungal effect was assessed by measuring the diameter of the inhibition zone, noting the concentration per disk. Results The results show that methanolic extracts of Nigella sativa have the strongest antifungal effect followed by the chloroform extracts. Aqueous extracts showed no antifungal activity. Conclusions The research shows treatment with natural products in a good light as an alternative for treating fungal infections. The authors envisage Nigella sativa extract enhancing the effect of conventional therapy. read more read less

Topics:

Nigella sativa (67%)67% related to the paper, Becton dickinson (55%)55% related to the paper
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35 Citations
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European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy format uses unsrt citation style.

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SHERPA/RoMEO Database

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RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
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  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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