Example of Behaviour format
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Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format Example of Behaviour format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 57959 e-ISSN: 1568539X

Behaviour — Template for authors

Publisher: Brill
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Animal Science and Zoology #160 of 416 down down by 79 ranks
Behavioral Neuroscience #60 of 78 down down by 14 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 227 Published Papers | 486 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 19/06/2020
Insights & related journals
General info
Top papers
Popular templates
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

1.019

27% from 2018

Impact factor for Behaviour from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 1.019
2018 1.401
2017 1.484
2016 1.394
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 27% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

2.1

16% from 2019

CiteRatio for Behaviour from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.1
2019 2.5
2018 3.0
2017 2.8
2016 2.4
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has decreased by 16% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.737

23% from 2019

SJR for Behaviour from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.737
2019 0.601
2018 0.631
2017 0.808
2016 0.756
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 23% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.747

30% from 2019

SNIP for Behaviour from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.747
2019 0.575
2018 0.633
2017 0.711
2016 0.688
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 30% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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CiteRatio: 6.1 | SJR: 0.64 | SNIP: 1.257
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CiteRatio: 3.1 | SJR: 0.62 | SNIP: 0.797
Behaviour

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Brill

Behaviour

Behaviour is interested in all aspects of animal (including human) behaviour, from ecology and physiology to learning, cognition, and neuroscience. Evolutionary approaches, which concern themselves with the advantages of behaviour or capacities for the organism and its reprodu...... Read More

Animal Science and Zoology

Behavioral Neuroscience

Agricultural and Biological Sciences

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Last updated on
19 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0005-7959
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Impact Factor
Medium - 0.657
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Open Access
No
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
plainnat
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
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Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, and T. M. Klapwijk. Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys. Rev. B, 25(7):4515– 4532, 1982. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515.

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156853974X00534
Observational study of behavior: sampling methods.
Jeanne Altmann1
01 Jan 1974 - Behaviour

Abstract:

Seven major types of sampling for observational studies of social behavior have been found in the literature. These methods differ considerably in their suitability for providing unbiased data of various kinds. Below is a summary of the major recommended uses of each technique: In this paper, I have tried to point out the maj... Seven major types of sampling for observational studies of social behavior have been found in the literature. These methods differ considerably in their suitability for providing unbiased data of various kinds. Below is a summary of the major recommended uses of each technique: In this paper, I have tried to point out the major strengths and weaknesses of each sampling method. Some methods are intrinsically biased with respect to many variables, others to fewer. In choosing a sampling method the main question is whether the procedure results in a biased sample of the variables under study. A method can produce a biased sample directly, as a result of intrinsic bias with respect to a study variable, or secondarily due to some degree of dependence (correlation) between the study variable and a directly-biased variable. In order to choose a sampling technique, the observer needs to consider carefully the characteristics of behavior and social interactions that are relevant to the study population and the research questions at hand. In most studies one will not have adequate empirical knowledge of the dependencies between relevant variables. Under the circumstances, the observer should avoid intrinsic biases to whatever extent possible, in particular those that direcly affect the variables under study. Finally, it will often be possible to use more than one sampling method in a study. Such samples can be taken successively or, under favorable conditions, even concurrently. For example, we have found it possible to take Instantaneous Samples of the identities and distances of nearest neighbors of a focal individual at five or ten minute intervals during Focal-Animal (behavior) Samples on that individual. Often during Focal-Animal Sampling one can also record All Occurrences of Some Behaviors, for the whole social group, for categories of conspicuous behavior, such as predation, intergroup contact, drinking, and so on. The extent to which concurrent multiple sampling is feasible will depend very much on the behavior categories and rate of occurrence, the observational conditions, etc. Where feasible, such multiple sampling can greatly aid in the efficient use of research time. read more read less

Topics:

Sampling (statistics) (62%)62% related to the paper, Cluster sampling (59%)59% related to the paper, Sampling bias (58%)58% related to the paper, Nonprobability sampling (56%)56% related to the paper
11,757 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156853974X00345
The Social Organisation of Antelope in Relation To Their Ecology
01 Jan 1974 - Behaviour

Abstract:

The types of social organisation displayed by the African antelope species have been assigned in this paper to five classes, distinguished largely by the strategies used by the reproductively active males in securing mating rights, and the effects of those strategies on other social castes. The paper attempts to show that the... The types of social organisation displayed by the African antelope species have been assigned in this paper to five classes, distinguished largely by the strategies used by the reproductively active males in securing mating rights, and the effects of those strategies on other social castes. The paper attempts to show that these strategies are appropriate to each class because of the effects of other, ecological, aspects of their ways of life. The paper describes different feeding styles among antelope, in terms of selection of food items and coverage of home ranges. It argues that these feeding styles bear a relationship to maximum group size of feeding animals through the influence of dispersion of food items upon group cohesion. The feeding styles also bear a relationship to body size and to habitat choice, both of which influence the antelope species' antipredator behaviour. Thus feeding style is related to anti-predator behaviour which, in many species, influences minimum group size. Group size and the pattern of movement over the annual home range affect the likelihood of females being found in a given place at a given time, and it is this likelihood which, to a large extent, determines the kind of strategy a male must employ to achieve mating rights. The effects of the different strategies employed by males can be seen in such aspects of each species' biology as sexual dimorphism, adult sex ratio, and differential distribution of the sexes. read more read less
2,013 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156853980X00447
An Ecological Model of Female-Bonded Primate Groups
Richard W. Wrangham1
01 Jan 1980 - Behaviour

Abstract:

1. Multi-female groups of primates fall into two main classes, (a) female-bonded (FB) and (b) non-female-bonded (non-FB). A model is presented to account for the evolution of FB groups in terms of ecological pressures on female relationships. 2. The model suggests that FB groups have evolved as a result of competition for hig... 1. Multi-female groups of primates fall into two main classes, (a) female-bonded (FB) and (b) non-female-bonded (non-FB). A model is presented to account for the evolution of FB groups in terms of ecological pressures on female relationships. 2. The model suggests that FB groups have evolved as a result of competition for high-quality food patches containing a limited number of feeding sites. Groups are viewed as being based on cooperative relationships among females. These relationships are beneficial because cooperators act together to supplant others from preferred food patches. 3. Ecological data support the model for most FB species, but not for Theropithecus gelada or Colobus guereza, whose foods are not found in high-quality patches with limited feeding sites. Non-FB species conform to expectation, either because they do not use high-quality patches, or because feeding competition has disruptive effects during periods of food scarcity. 4. The behaviour of females differs as expected between FB and non-FB species in group movements and in inter-group interactions; in both contexts females are more involved in FB species. 5. Multi-male groups tend to be found in non-territorial FB species. The presence of several males per group is suggested to benefit females by raising the competitive ability of the group in inter-group interactions. 6. Competitive relationships among females are more strongly marked in FB groups than in non-FB groups. The model suggests that relationships in most FB groups are ultimately related to feeding competition. read more read less
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1,770 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156853963X00185
A comparison of the social postures of some common laboratory rodents.
E.C. Grant, J.H. Mackintosh1
01 Jan 1963 - Behaviour

Abstract:

This paper describes elements in the social behaviour of the laboratory rat, mouse, hamster and Guinea-pig. These elements are divided into postures, which are static, and acts, which involve movement. A total of 45 of these elements are mentioned, most of which are common, with only slight modification, to all four species. ... This paper describes elements in the social behaviour of the laboratory rat, mouse, hamster and Guinea-pig. These elements are divided into postures, which are static, and acts, which involve movement. A total of 45 of these elements are mentioned, most of which are common, with only slight modification, to all four species. Apart from these the guinea pig differs in not having a true Upright Posture and also in showing a male sexul display "Rumba". The postures are classified under broad motivational headings. A number of general concepts are discussed, for example the relation of convulsions to flight behaviour, the reduction of incoming aggressive stimuli in submissive postures, "Cut-Off", and the inhibition of biting in the more social species. read more read less
1,125 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156853983X00147
Why Are Diurnal Primates Living in Groups
C.P. Van Schaik1
01 Jan 1983 - Behaviour

Abstract:

There are two main competing theories on the evolution of group living in diurnal nonhuman primates. The first theory claims that predation avoidance favours group living, whereas there are only disadvantages to feeding in a group and feeding competition increases with group size. The second theory claims that there is a feed... There are two main competing theories on the evolution of group living in diurnal nonhuman primates. The first theory claims that predation avoidance favours group living, whereas there are only disadvantages to feeding in a group and feeding competition increases with group size. The second theory claims that there is a feeding advantage to group living deriving from communal defence of high-quality food patches and that predation is not important. These theories have not yet been rigorously tested. In this paper a critical test is proposed: the theories differ in the predicted relationship between a female's birth rate and the size of the group in which she lives (Fig. 1). An additional test is concerned with the predicted relationship between population density relative to food availability and average group size. Finally, a critical test is proposed of the hypothesis that increasing group size should lead to reduced predation risk by comparing demographic patterns between areas where predators are still present and where they have disappeared. A total of 23 data sets on 13 species were extracted from the literature and supplemented with four unpublished data sets. In all three tests the results provide strong support for the predation-feeding competition theory and are clearly unfavourable for the theory postulating feeding advantages to group living. Such feeding advantages may, however, gain prominence under some conditions. read more read less
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926 Citations
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Behaviour format uses plainnat citation style.

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Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Behaviour citation style.

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A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Behaviour's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

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After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

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After uploading your paper on SciSpace, you would see a button to request a journal submission service for Behaviour.

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Yes. SciSpace provides this functionality.

After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Behaviour Endnote style, according to brill guidelines.

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