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Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format
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Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format Example of Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions format
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Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions — Template for authors

Publisher: Brill
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Religious Studies #68 of 491 up up by 76 ranks
History #242 of 1328 up up by 234 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 27 Published Papers | 20 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 21/07/2020
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open access Open Access

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Quality:  
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SNIP: 0.988

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Quality:  
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CiteRatio: 1.0
SJR: 0.158
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CiteRatio: 0.9
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Journal Performance & Insights

CiteRatio

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.7

75% from 2019

CiteRatio for Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.7
2019 0.4
2018 0.6
2017 0.4
2016 0.3
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

0.318

194% from 2019

SJR for Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.318
2019 0.108
2018 0.173
2017 0.149
2016 0.145
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

2.69

485% from 2019

SNIP for Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.69
2019 0.46
2018 1.364
2017 1.057
2016 0.565
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 75% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 194% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 485% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

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Brill

Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

The Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions (JANER) focuses on the religions of the area commonly referred to as the Ancient Near East encompassing Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria-Palestine, and Anatolia, as well as immediately adjacent areas under their cultural influence, from p...... Read More

Religious studies

History

Arts and Humanities

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Last updated on
21 Jul 2020
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ISSN
1569-2116
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Impact Factor
Low - 0.129
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Open Access
No
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
plainnat
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
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Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, and T. M. Klapwijk. Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys. Rev. B, 25(7):4515– 4532, 1982. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515.

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156921207783876404
The Storm-Gods of the Ancient Near East: Summary, Synthesis, Recent Studies: Part II

Abstract:

In many regions of the ancient Near East, not least in Upper Mesopotamia, Syria and Anatolia where agriculture relied mainly on rainfall, storm-gods ranked among the most prominent gods in the local panthea or were even regarded as divine kings, ruling over the gods and bestowing kingship on the human ruler. While the Babylon... In many regions of the ancient Near East, not least in Upper Mesopotamia, Syria and Anatolia where agriculture relied mainly on rainfall, storm-gods ranked among the most prominent gods in the local panthea or were even regarded as divine kings, ruling over the gods and bestowing kingship on the human ruler. While the Babylonian and Assyrian storm-god never held the highest position among the gods, he too belongs to the group of 'great gods' through most periods of Mesopotamian history. Given the many cultural contacts and the longevity of traditions in the ancient Near East only a study that takes into account all relevant periods, regions and text-groups can further our understanding of the different ancient Near Eastern storm-gods. The study Wettergottgestalten Mesopotamiens und Nordsyriens by the present author (2001) tried to tackle the problems involved, basing itself primarily on the textual record and excluding the genuinely Anatolian storm-gods from the study. Given the lack of handbooks, concordances and thesauri in our field, the book is necessarily heavily burdened with materials collected for the first time. Despite comprehensive indices, the long lists and footnotes as well as the lack of an overall synthesis make the study not easily accessible, especially outside the German-speaking community. In 2003 Alberto Green published a comprehensive monograph entitled The Storm-God in the Ancient Near East whose aims are more ambitious than those of Wettergottgestalten: All regions of the ancient Near East—including a chapter on Yahwe as a storm-god—are taken into account, and both textual and iconographic sources are given equal space. Unfortunately this book, which was apparently finished and submitted to the publisher before Wettergottgestalten came to its author's attention, suffers from some serious flaws with regard to methodology, philology and the interpretation of texts and images. In presenting the following succinct overview I take the opportunity to make up for the missing synthesis in Wettergottgestalten and to provide some additions and corrections where necessary. It is hoped that this synthesis can also serve as a response to the history of ancient Near Eastern storm-gods as outlined by A. Green. read more read less

Topics:

Mesopotamia (53%)53% related to the paper, Panthea (50%)50% related to the paper
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55 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156921208786611764
The Uruk List of Kings and Sages and Late Mesopotamian Scholarship
Alan Lenzi1

Abstract:

The Uruk List of Kings and Sages is best known for its genealogy connecting human scholars to antediluvian sages. Since its publication in 1962, however, questions pertaining to the text's specific purpose within the context of Hellenistic Uruk have been neglected. This study seeks to understand two such questions: why is the... The Uruk List of Kings and Sages is best known for its genealogy connecting human scholars to antediluvian sages. Since its publication in 1962, however, questions pertaining to the text's specific purpose within the context of Hellenistic Uruk have been neglected. This study seeks to understand two such questions: why is the most explicit scholarly genealogy written in the Hellenistic period?; and who is the last named person in the text? Seeking answers to these questions sheds new light on the text's purpose: it is an attempt by scholars to gain support for themselves and their novel cultic agenda. La reputation de la liste des Uruk de les rois et les sages est due a sa genealogie, qui cree un lien entre les savants humains et les sages antediluviens. Par contre, depuis sa publication en 1962 on a neglige les questions qui ont affaire au but specifique du texte dans le contexte de l'Uruk hellenistique. Cette etude cherche a comprendre deux questions dans ce domaine: pourquoi la genealogie la plus explicitement savante est-elle ecrite pendant l'epoque hellenistique?; et qui est la derniere personne nommee dans le texte? Chercher des reponses a ces questions illumine d'une nouvelle facon le but du texte; c'est une tentative par des savants de gagner du soutien pour leur programme original de culte ainsi que pour eux-memes. read more read less
28 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/1569212031960384
The Origin of Apollo

Abstract:

We shall argue that Burkert's etymology deriving the name Apollo from a Dorian word for 'assembly', απeλλα, is linguistically and historically impossible. This means that the possibility of Anatolian origin is open again. It is argued that Apollo is a Pre-Greek-Anatolian name. The expected proto-form of this name is found in ... We shall argue that Burkert's etymology deriving the name Apollo from a Dorian word for 'assembly', απeλλα, is linguistically and historically impossible. This means that the possibility of Anatolian origin is open again. It is argued that Apollo is a Pre-Greek-Anatolian name. The expected proto-form of this name is found in the name Appaliunas , a god of Wilusa/Ilios mentioned in a Hittite letter. This strongly suggests Anatolian origin of the name. This is confirmed by the Homeric epithet αυκηγeνηζ, which has long been recognised as an archaic formation meaning 'born in Lycia'. This fits well with the strong Anatolian connections of Apollo as well as his mother Leto and his sister Artemis. L'etymologie proposee par Burkert du mot Apollon comme derive du mot apella, 'assemblee', est impossible, pour des raisons linguistiques et historiques. Il est donc possible que le mot, et le dieu, est d'origine anatolienne. Le nom est pre-grecanatolien. La proto-forme expectee est trouvee dans le nom Appaliunas , dieu de Wilusa / Ilios mentionne dans une lettre hittite, ce qui est une belle confirmation d'une origine anatolienne. Ceci est confirme par l'epithete homerique Lukegenes, 'ne en Lycie'. Une origine anatolienne est en accord avec les liens d'Apollon lui meme, sa mere Leto et sa soeur Artemis avec l'Anatolie. read more read less
26 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156921210X538106
Local Manifestations of Yahweh and Worship in the Interstices: A Note on Kuntillet Ajrud
Jeremy M. Hutton1

Abstract:

The Shema (Deut 6:4) has long posed a crux interpretum in studies of early Israelite religion. Although the verse is often understood as a rejection of “foreign” deities in favor of Israel’s God Yahweh, some have understood the verse as a textual consolidation of Yahweh’s multiple identities. The present study draws attention... The Shema (Deut 6:4) has long posed a crux interpretum in studies of early Israelite religion. Although the verse is often understood as a rejection of “foreign” deities in favor of Israel’s God Yahweh, some have understood the verse as a textual consolidation of Yahweh’s multiple identities. The present study draws attention to the specific local manifestations of Yahweh at Kuntillet Ajrud and their respective archaeological contexts, locating those expressions within the larger regional and pan-Israelite religious system. Attentiveness to the archaeological provenance of each pertinent inscription suggests that distinctions obtained between the devotional expressions towards each local manifestation of Yahweh. Insofar as it is possible to draw conclusions from the extant epigraphic and iconographic data, the expressions of devotion towards Yahweh of Teman was officially sanctioned; no such official recognition of Yahweh of Samaria existed. When no sanctioned space existed for such recognition, personal expressions of piety were expressed interstitially. read more read less
25 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156921206780602690
Pigs at the Gate: Hittite Pig Sacrifice in its Eastern Mediterranean Context

Abstract:

The consumption of pork in Hittite Anatolia is unlikely to have been a simple matter of geography or ethnicity, but was governed by a complex set of principles involving determiners like status, gender, and the level of cultic influence from religious sanctuaries. On the few occasions that the Hittite texts refer directly to ... The consumption of pork in Hittite Anatolia is unlikely to have been a simple matter of geography or ethnicity, but was governed by a complex set of principles involving determiners like status, gender, and the level of cultic influence from religious sanctuaries. On the few occasions that the Hittite texts refer directly to eating pork, the context is highly ritualized, suggesting that special religious significance was sometimes attached to the eating of pig's flesh. Further, drawing on evidence from the societies surrounding the Mediterranean basin, a case can be made for the private nature of pig sacrifice in Hittite Anatolia. They were killed to ensure the wellbeing of the community and the fertility of humans and crops. A festival performed in Istanuwa to reaffirm the human-divine relationship may parallel the practice of sacrificing a pig at the ratification of treaties in the classical world. Finally, this animal's unique place among the domesticates extends to its role as a substitute for humans, a ritual motif that can be found throughout the Mediterranean in antiquity. read more read less

Topics:

Hittite language (50%)50% related to the paper
24 Citations
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SHERPA/RoMEO Database

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RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

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