Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format
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Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format
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Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format Example of Journal of Cognition and Culture format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 15677095 e-ISSN: 15685373

Journal of Cognition and Culture — Template for authors

Publisher: Brill
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Cultural Studies #122 of 1037 down down by 12 ranks
Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous) #143 of 306 -
Social Psychology #183 of 289 down down by 28 ranks
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology #114 of 148 down down by 14 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 88 Published Papers | 134 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 15/06/2020
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Journal Performance & Insights

  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

1.5

25% from 2019

CiteRatio for Journal of Cognition and Culture from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.5
2019 1.2
2018 1.4
2017 1.5
2016 1.7
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 25% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.435

12% from 2019

SJR for Journal of Cognition and Culture from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.435
2019 0.494
2018 0.349
2017 0.409
2016 0.625
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 12% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.476

31% from 2019

SNIP for Journal of Cognition and Culture from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.476
2019 0.692
2018 0.603
2017 0.754
2016 0.784
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 31% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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Journal of Cognition and Culture

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Brill

Journal of Cognition and Culture

The Journal of Cognition and Culture provides an interdisciplinary forum for exploring the mental foundations of culture and the cultural foundations of mental life. The primary focus of the journal is on explanations of cultural phenomena in terms of acquisition, representati...... Read More

Cultural Studies

Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Social Psychology

Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Social Sciences

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Last updated on
15 Jun 2020
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ISSN
1567-7095
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Impact Factor
Medium - 0.845
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Open Access
No
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
plainnat
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
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Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, and T. M. Klapwijk. Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys. Rev. B, 25(7):4515– 4532, 1982. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515.

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/1568537054068660
Linkages between Number Concepts, Spatial Thinking, and Directionality of Writing: The SNARC Effect and the REVERSE SNARC Effect in English and Arabic Monoliterates, Biliterates, and Illiterate Arabic Speakers.
Samar Zebian1

Abstract:

The current investigations coordinate math cognition and cultural approaches to numeric thinking to examine the linkages between numeric and spatial processes, and how these linkages are modified by the cultural artifact of writing. Previous research in the adult numeric cognition literature has shown that English monoliterat... The current investigations coordinate math cognition and cultural approaches to numeric thinking to examine the linkages between numeric and spatial processes, and how these linkages are modified by the cultural artifact of writing. Previous research in the adult numeric cognition literature has shown that English monoliterates have a spatialised mental number line which is oriented from left-to-right with smaller magnitudes associated with the left side of space and larger magnitudes are associated with the right side of space. These associations between number and space have been termed the Spatial Numeric Association Response Code Effect (SNARC effect, Dehaene, 1992). The current study investigates the spatial orientation of the mental number line in the following groups: English monoliterates, Arabic monoliterates who use only the right-left writing system, Arabic-English biliterates, and illiterate Arabic speakers who only read numerals. Current results indicate, for the first time, a Reverse SNARC effect for Arabic monoliterates, such that the mental number line had a right-to-left directionality. Furthermore, a weakened Reverse SNARC was observed for Arabic-English biliterates, and no effect was observed among Illiterate Arabic speakers. These findings are especially notable since left-right biases are neurologically supported and are observed in pre-literate children regardless of which writing system is used by adults. The broader implications of how cultural artifacts affect basic numeric cognition will be discussed. read more read less
307 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156853702320281836
On Modeling Cognition and Culture: Why cultural evolution does not require replication of representations
Joseph Henrich1, Robert Boyd2

Abstract:

Formal models of cultural evolution analyze how cognitive processes combine with social interaction to generate the distributions and dynamics of 'representations.' Recently, cognitive anthropologists have criticized such models. They make three points: mental representations are non-discrete, cultural transmission is highly ... Formal models of cultural evolution analyze how cognitive processes combine with social interaction to generate the distributions and dynamics of 'representations.' Recently, cognitive anthropologists have criticized such models. They make three points: mental representations are non-discrete, cultural transmission is highly inaccurate, and mental representations are not replicated, but rather are 'reconstructed' through an inferential process that is strongly affected by cognitive 'attractors.' They argue that it follows from these three claims that: 1) models that assume replication or replicators are inappropriate, 2) selective cultural learning cannot account for stable traditions, and 3) selective cultural learning cannot generate cumulative adaptation. Here we use three formal models to show that even if the premises of this critique are correct, the deductions that have been drawn from them are false. In the first model, we assume continuously varying representations under the influence of weak selective transmission and strong attractors. We show that if the attractors are sufficiently strong relative to selective forces, the continuous representation model reduces to the standard discrete-trait replicator model, and the weak selective component determines the final equilibrium of the system. In the second model, we assume inaccurate replication and discrete traits. We show that very low fidelity replication of representations at the individual level does not preclude accurate replication at the population level, and therefore, accurate individual-level replication of representations is not necessary for either cultural inertia or cumulative cultural adaptation. In the third model, we derive plausible conditions for cumulative adaptive evolution, assuming continuous cultural representations, incomplete transmission and substantial inferential transformations. read more read less

Topics:

Cultural learning (54%)54% related to the paper, Cultural transmission in animals (52%)52% related to the paper, Mental representation (50%)50% related to the paper
212 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156853701300063589
Spreading Non-natural Concepts: The Role of Intuitive Conceptual Structures in Memory and Transmission of Cultural Materials ¤
Justin L. Barrett1, Melanie A. Nyhof1

Abstract:

The four experiments presented support Boyer’ s theory that counterintuitive concepts have transmission advantages that account for the commonness and ease of communicating many non-natural cultural concepts. In Experiment 1, 48 American college students recalled expectation-violating items from culturally unfamiliar folk sto... The four experiments presented support Boyer’ s theory that counterintuitive concepts have transmission advantages that account for the commonness and ease of communicating many non-natural cultural concepts. In Experiment 1, 48 American college students recalled expectation-violating items from culturally unfamiliar folk stories better than more mundane items in the stories. In Experiment 2, 52 American college students in a modie ed serial reproduction task transmitted expectation-violating items in a written narrative more successfully than bizarre or common items. In Experiments 3 and 4, these e ndings were replicated with orally presented and transmitted stimuli, and found to persist even after three months. To sum, concepts with single expectation-violating features were more successfully transmitted than concepts that were entirely congruent with category-level expectations, even if they were highly unusual or bizarre. This transmission advantage for counterintuitive concepts may explain, in part, why such concepts are so prevalent across cultures and so readily spread. read more read less

Topics:

Counterintuitive (55%)55% related to the paper
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206 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/156853703321598563
Meat Is Good to Taboo: Dietary Proscriptions as a Product of the Interaction of Psychological Mechanisms and Social Processes

Abstract:

Comparing food taboos across 78 cultures, this paper demonstrates that meat, though a prized food, is also the principal target of proscriptions. Reviewing existing explanations of taboos, we find that both functionalist and symbolic approaches fail to account for meat's cross-cultural centrality and do not reflect experience... Comparing food taboos across 78 cultures, this paper demonstrates that meat, though a prized food, is also the principal target of proscriptions. Reviewing existing explanations of taboos, we find that both functionalist and symbolic approaches fail to account for meat's cross-cultural centrality and do not reflect experience-near aspects of food taboos, principal among which is disgust. Adopting an evolutionary approach to the mind, this paper presents an alternative to existing explanations of food taboos. Consistent with the attendant risk of pathogen transmission, meat has special salience as a stimulus for humans, as animal products are stronger elicitors of disgust and aversion than plant products. We identify three psychosocial processes, socially-mediated ingestive conditioning, egocentric empathy, and normative moralization, each of which likely plays a role in transforming individual disgust responses and conditioned food aversions into institutionalized food taboos. read more read less

Topics:

Disgust (53%)53% related to the paper
View PDF
180 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1163/1568537041725097
Shame in Two Cultures: Implications for Evolutionary Approaches
Daniel M. T. Fessler1

Abstract:

Cross-cultural comparisons can a) illuminate the manner in which cultures differentially highlight, ignore, and group various facets of emotional experience, and b) shed light on our evolved species-typical emotional architecture. In many societies, concern with shame is one of the principal factors regulating social behavior... Cross-cultural comparisons can a) illuminate the manner in which cultures differentially highlight, ignore, and group various facets of emotional experience, and b) shed light on our evolved species-typical emotional architecture. In many societies, concern with shame is one of the principal factors regulating social behavior. Three studies conducted in Bengkulu (Indonesia) and California explored the nature and experience of shame in two disparate cultures. Study 1, perceived term use frequency, indicated that shame is more prominent in Bengkulu, a collectivistic culture, than in California, an individualistic culture. Study 2, comparing naturally occurring shame events (Bengkulu) with reports thereof (California), revealed that shame is associated with guilt-like accounts in California but not in Bengkulu, and subordinance events in Bengkulu but not in California; published reports suggest that the latter pattern is prominent worldwide. Study 3 mapped the semantic domain of shame using a synonym task; again, guilt was prominent in California, subordinance in Bengkulu. Because shame is overshadowed by guilt in individualistic cultures, and because these cultures downplay aversive emotions associated with subordinance, a fuller understanding of shame is best arrived at through the study of collectivistic cultures such as Bengkulu. After reviewing evolutionary theories on the origins and functions of shame, I evaluate these perspectives in light of facets of this emotion evident in Bengkulu and elsewhere. The available data are consistent with the proposition that shame evolved from a rank-related emotion and, while motivating prestige competition, cooperation, and conformity, nevertheless continues to play this role in contemporary humans. read more read less

Topics:

Shame (62%)62% related to the paper, Individualistic culture (55%)55% related to the paper
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174 Citations
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Journal of Cognition and Culture format uses plainnat citation style.

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Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Journal of Cognition and Culture guidelines and autoformat it.

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Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Journal of Cognition and Culture citation style.

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One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Journal of Cognition and Culture's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

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To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
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SciSpace would allow download of your references in Journal of Cognition and Culture Endnote style, according to brill guidelines.

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