Example of Australian Health Review format
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Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format
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Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format Example of Australian Health Review format
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This content is only for preview purposes. The original open access content can be found here.
open access Open Access ISSN: 1565788 e-ISSN: 14498944

Australian Health Review — Template for authors

Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Health Policy #109 of 242 down down by 3 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 442 Published Papers | 1109 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 27/06/2020
Insights & related journals
General info
Top papers
Popular templates
Get started guide
Why choose from SciSpace
FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

1.32

7% from 2018

Impact factor for Australian Health Review from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 1.32
2018 1.228
2017 1.036
2016 1.343
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 7% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

2.5

14% from 2019

CiteRatio for Australian Health Review from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.5
2019 2.2
2018 2.1
2017 2.1
2016 1.9
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 14% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.644

14% from 2019

SJR for Australian Health Review from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.644
2019 0.566
2018 0.531
2017 0.55
2016 0.468
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 14% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.909

5% from 2019

SNIP for Australian Health Review from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.909
2019 0.956
2018 0.711
2017 0.801
2016 0.689
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 5% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 11287462 e-ISSN: 15917398
recommended Recommended

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CiteRatio: 3.2 | SJR: 1.216 | SNIP: 3.119
open access Open Access ISSN: 18333583 e-ISSN: 18333575
recommended Recommended

SAGE

CiteRatio: 4.3 | SJR: 0.603 | SNIP: 1.079
open access Open Access ISSN: 11786981

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CiteRatio: 2.7 | SJR: 0.591 | SNIP: 0.83
open access Open Access ISSN: 1177889X

Dove Medical Press

CiteRatio: 3.8 | SJR: 0.885 | SNIP: 1.285
Australian Health Review

Guideline source: View

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CSIRO Publishing

Australian Health Review

Australian Health Review explores major national and international health issues and questions. Topics covered by the Journal include all aspects of health policy and management, healthcare delivery systems, workforce, health financing and other matters of interest to those wo...... Read More

Health Policy

Medicine

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Last updated on
27 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0156-5788
i
Impact Factor
Medium - 0.704
i
Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
CSIRO Custom Citation
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Blonder, G. E., Tinkham, M. and Klapwijk, T. M. (1982). Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge im-balance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25(7), 4515–4532. URL: 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article
Measuring Health: A Guide to Rating Scales and Questionnaires
01 Aug 2006 - Australian Health Review

Topics:

Rating scale (59%)59% related to the paper
2,328 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/AH080766
A decade of data linkage in Western Australia: strategic design, applications and benefits of the WA data linkage system
01 Nov 2008 - Australian Health Review

Abstract:

Objectives: The report describes the strategic design, steps to full implementation and outcomes achieved by the Western Australian Data Linkage System (WADLS), instigated in 1995 to link up to 40 years of data from over 30 collections for an historical population of 3.7 million. Staged development has seen its expansion, ini... Objectives: The report describes the strategic design, steps to full implementation and outcomes achieved by the Western Australian Data Linkage System (WADLS), instigated in 1995 to link up to 40 years of data from over 30 collections for an historical population of 3.7 million. Staged development has seen its expansion, initially from a linkage key to local health data sets, to encompass links to national and local health and welfare data sets, genealogical links and spatial references for mapping applications. Applications: The WADLS has supported over 400 studies with over 250 journal publications and 35 graduate research degrees. Applications have occurred in health services utilisation and outcomes, aetiologic research, disease surveillance and needs analysis, and in methodologic research. Benefits: Longitudinal studies have become cheaper and more complete; deletion of duplicate records and correction of data artifacts have enhanced the quality of information assets; data linkage has conserved patient privacy; community machinery necessary for organised responses to health and social problems has been exercised; and the commercial return on research infrastructure investment has exceeded 1000%. Most importantly, there have been unbiased contributions to medical knowledge and identifiable advances in population health arising from the read more read less

Topics:

Record linkage (57%)57% related to the paper, Population health (54%)54% related to the paper, Population (53%)53% related to the paper, Health care (53%)53% related to the paper, Strategic design (50%)50% related to the paper
444 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/AH000216
The burden of disease and injury in Australia
Colin Mathers, Theo Vos, Christopher Stevenson
01 Jan 2000 - Australian Health Review

Abstract:

Reviewed by Don Hindle, Visiting Professor, School of Health Services Management,University of New South Wales

Topics:

Public health (67%)67% related to the paper, Health care (64%)64% related to the paper, Population health (63%)63% related to the paper, Health economics (61%)61% related to the paper, Government (50%)50% related to the paper
398 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article
Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results
01 Nov 2006 - Australian Health Review

Abstract:

A solution to get the problem off, have you found it? Really? What kind of solution do you resolve the problem? From what sources? Well, there are so many questions that we utter every day. No matter how you will get the solution, it will mean better. You can take the reference from some books. And the redefining health care ... A solution to get the problem off, have you found it? Really? What kind of solution do you resolve the problem? From what sources? Well, there are so many questions that we utter every day. No matter how you will get the solution, it will mean better. You can take the reference from some books. And the redefining health care creating value based competition on results is one book that we really recommend you to read, to get more solutions in solving this problem. read more read less

Topics:

Value (economics) (60%)60% related to the paper, Health care (58%)58% related to the paper, Competition (economics) (55%)55% related to the paper
343 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/AH080468
Social isolation and loneliness among older people: issues and future challenges in community and residential settings.
Linda Grenade1, Duncan Boldy
01 Aug 2008 - Australian Health Review

Abstract:

Although often associated with older age, loneliness and social isolation are not well understood in terms of their prevalence, risk and protective factors. Evidence suggests that only a minority of community-dwelling older people are "severely" lonely or isolated, however a number of factors need to be considered to fully un... Although often associated with older age, loneliness and social isolation are not well understood in terms of their prevalence, risk and protective factors. Evidence suggests that only a minority of community-dwelling older people are "severely" lonely or isolated, however a number of factors need to be considered to fully understand the extent and significance of the problem. Community-based studies have identified a variety of risk factors for loneliness/isolation including widowhood, no (surviving) children, living alone, deteriorating health, and life events (eg, loss and bereavement). Having a confidant has been identified as a protective factor for loneliness. However, evidence is often unclear or inconclusive, especially within residential settings. We identified the need to conduct more residential care-focused research; the importance of addressing a variety of methodological concerns; and the need for practitioners to develop intervention programs that are appropriately targeted, evidence-based and evaluated. read more read less

Topics:

Loneliness (65%)65% related to the paper, Social isolation (58%)58% related to the paper, Protective factor (53%)53% related to the paper, Population health (51%)51% related to the paper
241 Citations
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Australian Health Review format uses CSIRO Custom Citation citation style.

Automatically format and order your citations and bibliography in a click.

SciSpace allows imports from all reference managers like Mendeley, Zotero, Endnote, Google Scholar etc.

Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Australian Health Review guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Australian Health Review citation style.

You can avail our Free Trial for 7 days. I'm sure you'll find our features very helpful. Plus, it's quite inexpensive.

Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Australian Health Review's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it up and running within a matter of 3 working days. You can find the request box in the Journal Gallery on the right sidebar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for?".

After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

Our journal submission experts are skilled in submitting papers to various international journals.

After uploading your paper on SciSpace, you would see a button to request a journal submission service for Australian Health Review.

Each submission service is completed within 4 - 5 working days.

Yes. SciSpace provides this functionality.

After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Australian Health Review Endnote style, according to csiro-publishing guidelines.

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