Example of Australian Systematic Botany format
Recent searches

Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format
Sample paper formatted on SciSpace - SciSpace
This content is only for preview purposes. The original open access content can be found here.
Look Inside
Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format Example of Australian Systematic Botany format
Sample paper formatted on SciSpace - SciSpace
This content is only for preview purposes. The original open access content can be found here.
open access Open Access ISSN: 10301887

Australian Systematic Botany — Template for authors

Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Plant Science #181 of 445 down down by 25 ranks
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics #294 of 647 down down by 15 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 108 Published Papers | 262 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 28/06/2020
Insights & related journals
General info
Top papers
Popular templates
Get started guide
Why choose from SciSpace
FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

0.985

5% from 2018

Impact factor for Australian Systematic Botany from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 0.985
2018 1.039
2017 1.614
2016 0.75
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 5% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

2.4

CiteRatio for Australian Systematic Botany from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.4
2019 2.4
2018 2.7
2017 2.2
2016 2.1
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.466

21% from 2019

SJR for Australian Systematic Botany from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.466
2019 0.589
2018 0.697
2017 0.525
2016 0.484
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 21% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.067

32% from 2019

SNIP for Australian Systematic Botany from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.067
2019 0.807
2018 0.889
2017 0.751
2016 0.702
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 32% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 16642201 e-ISSN: 1664221X

Springer

CiteRatio: 4.0 | SJR: 0.875 | SNIP: 0.949
open access Open Access ISSN: 9406360 e-ISSN: 14321890
recommended Recommended

Springer

CiteRatio: 6.1 | SJR: 1.095 | SNIP: 1.178
open access Open Access ISSN: 68101 e-ISSN: 18749372

Springer

CiteRatio: 4.0 | SJR: 0.848 | SNIP: 1.375
Australian Systematic Botany

Guideline source: View

All company, product and service names used in this website are for identification purposes only. All product names, trademarks and registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Use of these names, trademarks and brands does not imply endorsement or affiliation. Disclaimer Notice

CSIRO Publishing

Australian Systematic Botany

Australian Systematic Botany considers papers and critical reviews that aim to advance systematic botany and related aspects of biogeography and evolution of all plant groups, including fossils. Descriptive taxonomic papers should normally constitute a comprehensive treatment ...... Read More

Plant Science

Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Agricultural and Biological Sciences

i
Last updated on
28 Jun 2020
i
ISSN
1030-1887
i
Impact Factor
Medium - 0.664
i
Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
CSIRO Custom Citation
i
Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Blonder, G. E., Tinkham, M. and Klapwijk, T. M. (1982). Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge im-balance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25(7), 4515–4532. URL: 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SB03015
L. A. S. JOHNSON REVIEW No. 2 Use of nuclear genes for phylogeny reconstruction in plants
Randall L. Small1, Richard Cronn, Jonathan F. Wendel

Abstract:

Molecular data have had a profound impact on the field of plant systematics, and the application of DNA-sequence data to phylogenetic problems is now routine. The majority of data used in plant molecular phylogenetic studies derives from chloroplast DNA and nuclear rDNA, while the use of low-copy nuclear genes has not been wi... Molecular data have had a profound impact on the field of plant systematics, and the application of DNA-sequence data to phylogenetic problems is now routine. The majority of data used in plant molecular phylogenetic studies derives from chloroplast DNA and nuclear rDNA, while the use of low-copy nuclear genes has not been widely adopted. This is due, at least in part, to the greater difficulty of isolating and characterising low-copy nuclear genes relative to chloroplast and rDNA sequences that are readily amplified with universal primers. The higher level of sequence variation characteristic of low-copy nuclear genes, however, often compensates for the experimental effort required to obtain them. In this review, we briefly discuss the strengths and limitations of chloroplast and rDNA sequences, and then focus our attention on the use of low-copy nuclear sequences. Advantages of low-copy nuclear sequences include a higher rate of evolution than for organellar sequences, the potential to accumulate datasets from multiple unlinked loci, and bi-parental inheritance. Challenges intrinsic to the use of low-copy nuclear sequences include distinguishing orthologous loci from divergent paralogous loci in the same gene family, being mindful of the complications arising from concerted evolution or recombination among paralogous sequences, and the presence of intraspecific, intrapopulational and intraindividual polymorphism. Finally, we provide a detailed protocol for the isolation, characterisation and use of low-copy nuclear sequences for phylogenetic studies. read more read less

Topics:

Nuclear gene (60%)60% related to the paper, Concerted evolution (56%)56% related to the paper, Chloroplast DNA (53%)53% related to the paper, Phylogenetic tree (52%)52% related to the paper, Phylogenetics (51%)51% related to the paper
View PDF
394 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SB98008
A new classification of the genus Eucalyptus L'Hér. (Myrtaceae)

Abstract:

A new formal classification of the genus Eucalyptus is presented. It divides the genus into seven polytypic subgenera: E. subg. Angophora, E. subg. Corymbia, E. subg. Blakella, E. subg. Eudesmia, E . subg. Symphyomyrtus, E. subg. Minutifructa and E. subg. Eucalyptus, and six monotypic subgenera: E. subg. Acerosa, E. subg. Cru... A new formal classification of the genus Eucalyptus is presented. It divides the genus into seven polytypic subgenera: E. subg. Angophora, E. subg. Corymbia, E. subg. Blakella, E. subg. Eudesmia, E . subg. Symphyomyrtus, E. subg. Minutifructa and E. subg. Eucalyptus, and six monotypic subgenera: E. subg. Acerosa, E. subg. Cruciformes, E. subg. Alveolata, E. subg. Cuboidea, E. subg. Idiogenes and E. subg. Primitiva. The system is intentionally phylogenetic, proceeding from the generally assumed primitive ‘apples’ (E. subg. Angophora) and bloodwoods (E. subg. Corymbia) to the most advanced and modified group, the monocalypts (E. subg. Eucalyptus). The genus Corymbia Hill & Johnson is subsumed under Eucalyptus and is represented by E. subg. Corymbia (the bloodwoods) and E. subg. Blakella (the ghostgums). New infrageneric taxa are diagnosed and their names typified, while brief digests in English are given for established taxa. Three species of the former genus Angophora have names with epithets preoccupied by names of other Eucalyptus species and new names are presented for them. The study is introduced by a brief historical summary of previous work in Eucalyptus, an apologia for the inclusion of Angophora, the reason for requirement of a new classification and notes on the nomenclature used. A new infrageneric rank, ‘supraspecies’, is introduced and is intentionally divorced in application (as a rank) from the similar sounding ‘superspecies’. All species recognised by the author are named and assigned in this system. read more read less

Topics:

Corymbia (58%)58% related to the paper, Angophora (51%)51% related to the paper
375 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SB9930277
Growth-forms in non-geniculate coralline red algae (Corallinales, Rhodophyta)
Wm. J. Woelkerling, LM Irvine, AS Harvey

Abstract:

Although differences in growth-form have been widely used in delimiting taxa of non-geniculate coralline red algae (Corallinales, Rhodophyta), there has been no consistent application of the more than 100 terms employed to describe the growth-forms present, and considerable confusion has resulted. This study of over 5000 popu... Although differences in growth-form have been widely used in delimiting taxa of non-geniculate coralline red algae (Corallinales, Rhodophyta), there has been no consistent application of the more than 100 terms employed to describe the growth-forms present, and considerable confusion has resulted. This study of over 5000 populations of non-geniculate corallines from all parts of the world has shown that an intergrading network of growth-forms with 10 focal points is present: unconsolidated, encrusting, warty, lumpy, fruticose, discoid, layered, foliose, ribbon-like and arborescent. This focal point terminology can be used to describe any specimen or species of non-geniculate coralline in a consistent, easily interpretable manner. Details of the system are provided, the relationships of the system to past proposals are discussed, and the extent to which differences in growth-forms can be used as taxonomic characters in the non-geniculate Corallinales is reviewed. read more read less

Topics:

Phymatolithon (55%)55% related to the paper, Corallinaceae (53%)53% related to the paper, Mastophoroideae (53%)53% related to the paper, Rhodolith (51%)51% related to the paper
287 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SB9910211
Patterns of diversification within continental biotas: Hierarchical congruence among the areas of endemism of Australian vertebrates

Abstract:

This paper investigates the extent to which there is hierarchical information about area-relationships contained in the distributions of Australian vertebrates. Distributions of genera, their included species, and their included subspecies (when appropriate) were coded present/absent for 14 areas of endemism. The data were th... This paper investigates the extent to which there is hierarchical information about area-relationships contained in the distributions of Australian vertebrates. Distributions of genera, their included species, and their included subspecies (when appropriate) were coded present/absent for 14 areas of endemism. The data were then analysed cladistically and most parsimonious area-cladograms constructed; bootstrap consensus trees were used to assess the strength of the cladistic signal. Distributions of birds and mammals were found to be nearly identical in their hierarchical pattern, and snakes shared the same general pattern of area-relationships. Frogs and lizards exhibited greater differences but were still congruent in some respects. This congruence calls for a general explanation. It is proposed that either the pattern can be explained in terms of (1) true area-relationships (vicariance), in which case biogeographic noise, including redundant distributions and widespread taxa do not disturb historical signal; (2) constraints on processes or events that lead to congruent histories of cosmopolitanism; or (3) a combination of both. read more read less

Topics:

Vicariance (51%)51% related to the paper
233 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SB02008
Overview of the generic status of Acacia (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

Abstract:

The systematic treatment and circumscription of the group of plants presently recognised as the genus Acacia has a complex history. The genus was first described by Philip Miller in 1754 and until 1842, when George Bentham clearly defined it's generic limits (by restricting the name Acacia to mimosoid plants having numerous f... The systematic treatment and circumscription of the group of plants presently recognised as the genus Acacia has a complex history. The genus was first described by Philip Miller in 1754 and until 1842, when George Bentham clearly defined it's generic limits (by restricting the name Acacia to mimosoid plants having numerous free stamens), a number of species which are now referable to genera within tribes Ingeae and Mimoseae had been referred to it. As presently defined, Acacia is a cosmopolitan genus containing in excess of 1350 species and together with the monotypic genus Faidherbia Chev. (which occurs in Africa and the Middle East), comprises tribe Acacieae within subfamily Mimosoideae. The current classification of Acacia views the genus as comprising three large subgenera, namely subg. Acacia (c. 161 species, pantropical), subg. Aculeiferum Vassal (235 species; pantropical) and subg. Phyllodineae (DC.) Seringe (syn. subg. Heterophyllum Vassal) (960 species, largely confined to Australia). In 1986, Pedley proposed that these three subgenera be attributed generic rank, namely Acacia, Senegalia Rafinesque and Racosperma C.Martius, respectively, but this proposal was not widely adopted. Subsequently, the results of monographic and floristic works have greatly expanded knowledge, not only of Acacia, but also of its presumed relatives in tribes Ingeae and Mimoseae. Cladistic analyses of chloroplast genes have been especially informative in developing a better understanding of phylogenetic relationships of the group. The new data clearly show that the genus as presently defined (i.e. Acacia sens. lat.) is not monophyletic. Furthermore, five separate monophyletic groups can be recognised within Acacia sens. lat. and it is recommended that these each be recognised as a distinct genus. The five genera correspond to those recognised by Pedley, except that Senegalia sens. lat. is now regarded as comprising three genera, namely Senegalia sens. str., Acaciella Britton & Rose [based on Acacia subg. Aculeiferum sect. Filicinae (Benth.) Pedley] and an undescribed genus based on a group of species related to Acacia coulteri Benth. Acacia subg. Acacia appears to be located in tribe Mimoseae. The relationships of subg. Phyllodineae, subg. Aculeiferum sens. str., sect. Filicinae, the 'Acacia coulteri' group and Faidherbia are not fully resolved, although in all studies these groups are shown to be monophyletic. Although it is appropriate that each be recognised as a distinct genus, the application of the names Acacia and Racosperma is currently under consideration and it is therefore not appropriate to use these names until this matter is resolved. read more read less

Topics:

Acaciella (67%)67% related to the paper, Senegalia (61%)61% related to the paper, Acacia (58%)58% related to the paper, Acacieae (57%)57% related to the paper, Vachellia (56%)56% related to the paper
201 Citations
Author Pic

SciSpace is a very innovative solution to the formatting problem and existing providers, such as Mendeley or Word did not really evolve in recent years.

- Andreas Frutiger, Researcher, ETH Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering

Get MS-Word and LaTeX output to any Journal within seconds
1
Choose a template
Select a template from a library of 40,000+ templates
2
Import a MS-Word file or start fresh
It takes only few seconds to import
3
View and edit your final output
SciSpace will automatically format your output to meet journal guidelines
4
Submit directly or Download
Submit to journal directly or Download in PDF, MS Word or LaTeX

(Before submission check for plagiarism via Turnitin)

clock Less than 3 minutes

What to expect from SciSpace?

Speed and accuracy over MS Word

''

With SciSpace, you do not need a word template for Australian Systematic Botany.

It automatically formats your research paper to CSIRO Publishing formatting guidelines and citation style.

You can download a submission ready research paper in pdf, LaTeX and docx formats.

Time comparison

Time taken to format a paper and Compliance with guidelines

Plagiarism Reports via Turnitin

SciSpace has partnered with Turnitin, the leading provider of Plagiarism Check software.

Using this service, researchers can compare submissions against more than 170 million scholarly articles, a database of 70+ billion current and archived web pages. How Turnitin Integration works?

Turnitin Stats
Publisher Logos

Freedom from formatting guidelines

One editor, 100K journal formats – world's largest collection of journal templates

With such a huge verified library, what you need is already there.

publisher-logos

Easy support from all your favorite tools

Australian Systematic Botany format uses CSIRO Custom Citation citation style.

Automatically format and order your citations and bibliography in a click.

SciSpace allows imports from all reference managers like Mendeley, Zotero, Endnote, Google Scholar etc.

Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Australian Systematic Botany guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Australian Systematic Botany citation style.

You can avail our Free Trial for 7 days. I'm sure you'll find our features very helpful. Plus, it's quite inexpensive.

Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Australian Systematic Botany's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it up and running within a matter of 3 working days. You can find the request box in the Journal Gallery on the right sidebar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for?".

After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

Our journal submission experts are skilled in submitting papers to various international journals.

After uploading your paper on SciSpace, you would see a button to request a journal submission service for Australian Systematic Botany.

Each submission service is completed within 4 - 5 working days.

Yes. SciSpace provides this functionality.

After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Australian Systematic Botany Endnote style, according to csiro-publishing guidelines.

Fast and reliable,
built for complaince.

Instant formatting to 100% publisher guidelines on - SciSpace.

Available only on desktops 🖥

No word template required

Typset automatically formats your research paper to Australian Systematic Botany formatting guidelines and citation style.

Verifed journal formats

One editor, 100K journal formats.
With the largest collection of verified journal formats, what you need is already there.

Trusted by academicians

I spent hours with MS word for reformatting. It was frustrating - plain and simple. With SciSpace, I can draft my manuscripts and once it is finished I can just submit. In case, I have to submit to another journal it is really just a button click instead of an afternoon of reformatting.

Andreas Frutiger
Researcher & Ex MS Word user
Use this template