Example of Soil Research format
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Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format Example of Soil Research format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 1838675X e-ISSN: 18386768

Soil Research — Template for authors

Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Soil Science #43 of 135 down down by 5 ranks
Environmental Science (miscellaneous) #34 of 104 down down by 7 ranks
Earth-Surface Processes #49 of 145 down down by 5 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 305 Published Papers | 995 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 25/06/2020
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

1.686

7% from 2018

Impact factor for Soil Research from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 1.686
2018 1.569
2017 1.591
2016 1.606
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 7% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.3

3% from 2019

CiteRatio for Soil Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 3.3
2019 3.2
2018 3.4
2017 3.0
2016 2.9
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 3% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.651

2% from 2019

SJR for Soil Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.651
2019 0.665
2018 0.774
2017 0.777
2016 0.753
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.82

4% from 2019

SNIP for Soil Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.82
2019 0.856
2018 0.807
2017 0.792
2016 1.028
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 18666280 e-ISSN: 18666299

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CiteRatio: 4.5 | SJR: 0.641 | SNIP: 1.11
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CiteRatio: 7.6 | SJR: 1.493 | SNIP: 2.047
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Hindawi

CiteRatio: 1.7 | SJR: 0.431 | SNIP: 1.285
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Springer

CiteRatio: 2.2 | SJR: 0.559 | SNIP: 1.323

Soil Research

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CSIRO Publishing

Soil Research

Soil Research (continuing Australian Journal of Soil Research) is an international journal for the publication of soil research relating to primary production, land and water management, environmental pollution, and site remediation. The journal has a particular, but not exclu...... Read More

Environmental Science

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Last updated on
25 Jun 2020
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ISSN
1838-675X
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Impact Factor
High - 1.038
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Open Access
No
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
CSIRO Custom Citation
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
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Bibliography Example
Blonder, G. E., Tinkham, M. and Klapwijk, T. M. (1982). Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge im-balance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25(7), 4515–4532. URL: 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SR07109
Agronomic values of greenwaste biochar as a soil amendment
K. Y. Chan, L. Van Zwieten, I. Meszaros, Adriana Downie1, Stephen Joseph1
07 Dec 2007 - Soil Research

Abstract:

A pot trial was carried out to investigate the effect of biochar produced from greenwaste by pyrolysis on the yield of radish (Raphanus sativus var. Long Scarlet) and the soil quality of an Alfisol. Three rates of biochar (10, 50 and 100 t/ha) with and without additional nitrogen application (100 kg N/ha) were investigated. T... A pot trial was carried out to investigate the effect of biochar produced from greenwaste by pyrolysis on the yield of radish (Raphanus sativus var. Long Scarlet) and the soil quality of an Alfisol. Three rates of biochar (10, 50 and 100 t/ha) with and without additional nitrogen application (100 kg N/ha) were investigated. The soil used in the pot trial was a hardsetting Alfisol (Chromosol) (0–0.1 m) with a long history of cropping. In the absence of N fertiliser, application of biochar to the soil did not increase radish yield even at the highest rate of 100 t/ha. However, a significant biochar × nitrogen fertiliser interaction was observed, in that higher yield increases were observed with increasing rates of biochar application in the presence of N fertiliser, highlighting the role of biochar in improving N fertiliser use efficiency of the plant. For example, additional increase in DM of radish in the presence of N fertiliser varied from 95% in the nil biochar control to 266% in the 100 t/ha biochar-amended soils. A slight but significant reduction in dry matter production of radish was observed when biochar was applied at 10 t/ha but the cause is unclear and requires further investigation. Significant changes in soil quality including increases in pH, organic carbon, and exchangeable cations as well as reduction in tensile strength were observed at higher rates of biochar application (>50 t/ha). Particularly interesting are the improvements in soil physical properties of this hardsetting soil in terms of reduction in tensile strength and increases in field capacity. read more read less

Topics:

Biochar (68%)68% related to the paper, Slash-and-char (62%)62% related to the paper, Soil organic matter (55%)55% related to the paper, Soil health (55%)55% related to the paper, Soil management (54%)54% related to the paper
1,498 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SR9910815
Aggregate hierarchy in soils
01 Jan 1991 - Soil Research

Abstract:

An Alfisol, a Mollisol and an Oxisol were fractionated into different particle sizes after a range of disaggregating treatments from gentle to vigorous. The Alfisol and the Mollisol appeared to break down in steps; macroaggregates >250 µm diameter breaking down to microaggregates 20-250 µm diameter before particles <20 µm wer... An Alfisol, a Mollisol and an Oxisol were fractionated into different particle sizes after a range of disaggregating treatments from gentle to vigorous. The Alfisol and the Mollisol appeared to break down in steps; macroaggregates >250 µm diameter breaking down to microaggregates 20-250 µm diameter before particles <20 µm were released. Vigorous disruption led to particle size distributions similar to those obtained by classical methods used to determine particle size distributions. The Oxisol was stable to rapid wetting treatments but when aggregate disruption was initiated by vigorous treatments particles <20 µm diameter were released and there was no evidence of aggregate hierarchy. Scanning electron microscopy of particles of different sizes showed distinctly single grain particles and aggregates. The microscopic studies indicated the potential role of roots and hyphae in the stabilization of larger aggregates, and for fragments of roots as nuclei for smaller aggregates. Plant debris was not visible in aggregates <20 µm but clay microstructure was evident. It is suggested that aggregate hierarchy occurs in Alfisols and Mollisols because organic materials are the dominant stabilizing agents in larger aggregates but in the Oxisol oxides are dominant stabilizing agents and prevent the expression of aggregate hierarchy caused by organic materials. read more read less

Topics:

Particle size (50%)50% related to the paper, Particle (50%)50% related to the paper
942 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SR08036
Using poultry litter biochars as soil amendments
K. Y. Chan, L. Van Zwieten, I. Meszaros, Adriana Downie1, Stephen Joseph1
26 Aug 2008 - Soil Research

Abstract:

Despite the recent interest in biochars as soil amendments for improving soil quality and increasing soil carbon sequestration, there is inadequate knowledge on the soil amendment properties of these materials produced from different feed stocks and under different pyrolysis conditions This is particularly true for biochars p... Despite the recent interest in biochars as soil amendments for improving soil quality and increasing soil carbon sequestration, there is inadequate knowledge on the soil amendment properties of these materials produced from different feed stocks and under different pyrolysis conditions This is particularly true for biochars produced from animal origins Two biochars produced from poultry litter under different conditions were tested in a pot trial by assessing the yield of radish (Raphanus sativus var Long Scarlet) as well as the soil quality of a hardsetting Chromosol (Alfisol) Four rates of biochar (0, 10, 25, and 50 t/ha), with and without nitrogen application (100 kg N/ha) were investigated Both biochars, without N fertiliser, produced similar increases in dry matter yield of radish, which were detectable at the lowest application rate, 10 t/ha The yield increase (%), compared with the unamended control rose from 42% at 10 t/ha to 96% at 50 t/ha of biochar application The yield increases can be attributed largely to the ability of these biochars to increase N availability Significant additional yield increases, in excess of that due to N fertiliser alone, were observed when N fertiliser was applied together with the biochars, highlighting the other beneficial effects of these biochars In this regard, the non activated poultry litter biochar produced at lower temperature (450°C) was more effective than the activated biochar produced at higher temperature (550°C), probably due to higher available P content Biochar addition to the hardsetting soil resulted in significant but different changes in soil chemical and physical properties, including increases in C, N, pH, and available P, but reduction in soil strength These different effects of the 2 different biochars can be related to their different characteristics Significantly different changes in soil biology in terms of microbial biomass and earthworm preference properties were also observed between the 2 biochars, but the underlying mechanisms require further research Our research highlights the importance of feedstock and process conditions during pyrolysis on the properties and, hence, soil amendment values of biochars read more read less

Topics:

Biochar (61%)61% related to the paper, Soil organic matter (57%)57% related to the paper, Soil conditioner (57%)57% related to the paper, Slash-and-char (57%)57% related to the paper, Soil health (57%)57% related to the paper
886 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/S96047
Soil phosphorus: its measurement, and its uptake by plants
01 Jan 1997 - Soil Research

Abstract:

Phosphorus (P) is the most important nutrient element (after nitrogen) limiting agricultural production in most regions of the world. It is extremely chemically reactive, and more than 170 phosphate minerals have been identified. In all its natural forms, including organic forms, P is very stable or insoluble, and only a very... Phosphorus (P) is the most important nutrient element (after nitrogen) limiting agricultural production in most regions of the world. It is extremely chemically reactive, and more than 170 phosphate minerals have been identified. In all its natural forms, including organic forms, P is very stable or insoluble, and only a very small proportion exists in the soil solution at any one time. Plant-available P may be considered in either its quantitative or intensive dimension. The quantity of available P is time-specific and crop-specific, because it is the amount of P that will come into the soil solution and be taken up by the crop during its life cycle. The intensity of available P (availability) is most easily identified with its concentration in the soil solution. The soil property controlling the relationship between the solid phase P and its concentration in solution is known as the buffering capacity. The solid phase P involved in this relationship is only a small proportion of the total P, and is known as labile P. It is usually measured by isotopic exchange, but this exchangeable P component does not include the sparingly soluble compounds that also replenish the soil solution as its concentration is depleted by plant uptake. The buffering capacity is the ability of the soil solution to resist a change in its P concentration as P is removed by plant uptake or added in fertilisers or organic materials. Buffering capacity is synonymous with sorptivity, which is a preferable term in the context of the reactivity of P fertiliser with soil. It is usually measured from an adsorption isotherm. By fitting a suitable equation, such as the Langmuir, the total sorption capacity as well as the sorption strength can be determined. Both parameters are important in understanding P availability in soils. Buffering capacity has a major effect on the uptake of labile P because it is inversely related to the ease of desorption of solid phase P and its diffusion. Available P therefore is a direct function of the quantity of labile P and an inverse function of buffering capacity. This has been demonstrated in plant uptake studies. Similarly, the most effective methods of measuring available P (soil tests) are those which remove a proportion of labile P that is inversely related to buffer capacity. Soil tests which measure the concentration of P in solution actually measure availability rather than available P, and their efficacy on a range of soils will depend on the uniformity of the soils" buffer capacities. The most effective soil test usually consists of an anionic extractant. Acidic lactate or fluoride have been found most effective in New South Wales, on a wide range of soils, except calcareous soils which neutralise the acidic component (usually hydrochloric or acetic acid) of the extractant. Sodium bicarbonate (pH 8 · 5) has been found effective on calcareous soils and is widely used throughout the world. It has proved unreliable on NSW soils, and may need more thorough evaluation on non-calcareous soils in other parts of Australia. read more read less

Topics:

Soil organic matter (58%)58% related to the paper, Soil health (57%)57% related to the paper, Soil water (54%)54% related to the paper, Soil test (53%)53% related to the paper, Phosphorus (50%)50% related to the paper
875 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/SR10009
An investigation into the reactions of biochar in soil
19 Oct 2010 - Soil Research

Abstract:

Interactions between biochar, soil, microbes, and plant roots may occur within a short period of time after application to the soil. The extent, rates, and implications of these interactions, however, are far from understood. This review describes the properties of biochars and suggests possible reactions that may occur after... Interactions between biochar, soil, microbes, and plant roots may occur within a short period of time after application to the soil. The extent, rates, and implications of these interactions, however, are far from understood. This review describes the properties of biochars and suggests possible reactions that may occur after the addition of biochars to soil. These include dissolution-precipitation, adsorption-desorption, acid-base, and redox reactions. Attention is given to reactions occurring within pores, and to interactions with roots, microorganisms, and soil fauna. Examination of biochars (from chicken litter, greenwaste, and paper mill sludges) weathered for 1 and 2 years in an Australian Ferrosol provides evidence for some of the mechanisms described in this review and offers an insight to reactions at a molecular scale. These interactions are biochar- and site-specific. Therefore, suitable experimental trials—combining biochar types and different pedoclimatic conditions—are needed to determine the extent to which these reactions influence the potential of biochar as a soil amendment and tool for carbon sequestration. read more read less

Topics:

Biochar (67%)67% related to the paper, Slash-and-char (61%)61% related to the paper, Soil organic matter (57%)57% related to the paper, Soil health (54%)54% related to the paper, Soil biology (53%)53% related to the paper
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784 Citations
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SciSpace is a very innovative solution to the formatting problem and existing providers, such as Mendeley or Word did not really evolve in recent years.

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With SciSpace, you do not need a word template for Soil Research.

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Soil Research format uses CSIRO Custom Citation citation style.

Automatically format and order your citations and bibliography in a click.

SciSpace allows imports from all reference managers like Mendeley, Zotero, Endnote, Google Scholar etc.

Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Soil Research guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Soil Research citation style.

You can avail our Free Trial for 7 days. I'm sure you'll find our features very helpful. Plus, it's quite inexpensive.

Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Soil Research's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it up and running within a matter of 3 working days. You can find the request box in the Journal Gallery on the right sidebar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for?".

After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

Our journal submission experts are skilled in submitting papers to various international journals.

After uploading your paper on SciSpace, you would see a button to request a journal submission service for Soil Research.

Each submission service is completed within 4 - 5 working days.

Yes. SciSpace provides this functionality.

After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Soil Research Endnote style, according to csiro-publishing guidelines.

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