Example of Wildlife Research format
Recent searches

Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format
Sample paper formatted on SciSpace - SciSpace
This content is only for preview purposes. The original open access content can be found here.
Look Inside
Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format Example of Wildlife Research format
Sample paper formatted on SciSpace - SciSpace
This content is only for preview purposes. The original open access content can be found here.
open access Open Access ISSN: 10353712

Wildlife Research — Template for authors

Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics #235 of 647 up up by 19 ranks
Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law #141 of 355 down down by 32 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 281 Published Papers | 831 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 06/07/2020
Insights & related journals
General info
Top papers
Popular templates
Get started guide
Why choose from SciSpace
FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

1.669

34% from 2018

Impact factor for Wildlife Research from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 1.669
2018 1.244
2017 1.41
2016 1.29
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 34% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.0

20% from 2019

CiteRatio for Wildlife Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 3.0
2019 2.5
2018 2.7
2017 2.5
2016 2.4
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 20% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.81

4% from 2019

SJR for Wildlife Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.81
2019 0.847
2018 0.802
2017 0.874
2016 0.784
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.099

28% from 2019

SNIP for Wildlife Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.099
2019 0.858
2018 0.859
2017 0.785
2016 0.777
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 28% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 14672960 e-ISSN: 14672979
recommended Recommended

Wiley

CiteRatio: 12.0 | SJR: 2.747 | SNIP: 2.853
open access Open Access ISSN: 16124642

Springer

CiteRatio: 2.6 | SJR: 0.637 | SNIP: 0.87
open access Open Access ISSN: 9234861 e-ISSN: 15729834

Springer

CiteRatio: 2.6 | SJR: 0.486 | SNIP: 0.746
open access Open Access ISSN: 2755947 e-ISSN: 15488675

American Fisheries Society

CiteRatio: 2.0 | SJR: 0.587 | SNIP: 0.797

Wildlife Research

Guideline source: View

All company, product and service names used in this website are for identification purposes only. All product names, trademarks and registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Use of these names, trademarks and brands does not imply endorsement or affiliation. Disclaimer Notice

CSIRO Publishing

Wildlife Research

Approved by publishing and review experts on SciSpace, this template is built as per for Wildlife Research formatting guidelines as mentioned in CSIRO Publishing author instructions. The current version was created on 06 Jul 2020 and has been used by 964 authors to write and format their manuscripts to this journal.

Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Environmental Science

i
Last updated on
06 Jul 2020
i
ISSN
1035-3712
i
Impact Factor
Medium - 0.753
i
Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
CSIRO Custom Citation
i
Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Blonder, G. E., Tinkham, M. and Klapwijk, T. M. (1982). Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge im-balance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25(7), 4515–4532. URL: 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/WR99107
Kullback-Leibler information as a basis for strong inference in ecological studies
Kenneth P. Burnham1, David E. Anderson
12 Apr 2001 - Wildlife Research

Abstract:

We describe an information-theoretic paradigm for analysis of ecological data, based on Kullback–Leibler information, that is an extension of likelihood theory and avoids the pitfalls of null hypothesis testing. Information-theoretic approaches emphasise a deliberate focus on the a priori science in developing a set of multip... We describe an information-theoretic paradigm for analysis of ecological data, based on Kullback–Leibler information, that is an extension of likelihood theory and avoids the pitfalls of null hypothesis testing. Information-theoretic approaches emphasise a deliberate focus on the a priori science in developing a set of multiple working hypotheses or models. Simple methods then allow these hypotheses (models) to be ranked from best to worst and scaled to reflect a strength of evidence using the likelihood of each model (gi), given the data and the models in the set (i.e. L(gi | data)). In addition, a variance component due to model-selection uncertainty is included in estimates of precision. There are many cases where formal inference can be based on all the models in the a priori set and this multi-model inference represents a powerful, new approach to valid inference. Finally, we strongly recommend inferences based on a priori considerations be carefully separated from those resulting from some form of data dredging. An example is given for questions related to age- and sex-dependent rates of tag loss in elephant seals (Mirounga leonina). read more read less

Topics:

Inference (59%)59% related to the paper, Strong inference (55%)55% related to the paper, Data dredging (54%)54% related to the paper, Kullback–Leibler divergence (51%)51% related to the paper, Null hypothesis (50%)50% related to the paper
809 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/WR9930045
VORTEX: a computer simulation model for population viability analysis
01 Jan 1993 - Wildlife Research

Abstract:

Population Viability Analysis (PVA) is the estimation of extinction probabilities by analyses that incorporate identifiable threats to population survival into models of the extinction process. Extrinsic forces, such as habitat loss, over-harvesting, and competition or predation by introduced species, often lead to population... Population Viability Analysis (PVA) is the estimation of extinction probabilities by analyses that incorporate identifiable threats to population survival into models of the extinction process. Extrinsic forces, such as habitat loss, over-harvesting, and competition or predation by introduced species, often lead to population decline. Although the traditional methods of wildlife ecology can reveal such deterministic trends, random fluctuations that increase as populations become smaller can lead to extinction even of populations that have, on average, positive population growth when below carrying capacity. Computer simulation modelling provides a tool for exploring the viability of populations subjected to many complex, interacting deterministic and random processes. One such simulation model, VORTEX, has been used extensively by the Captive Breeding Specialist Group (Species Survival Commission, IUCN), by wildlife agencies, and by university classes. The algorithms, structure, assumptions and applications of VORTEX are described in this paper. VORTEX models population processes as discrete, sequential events, with probabilistic outcomes. VORTEX simulates birth and death processes and the transmission of genes through the generations by generating random numbers to determine whether each animal lives or dies, to determine the number of progeny produced by each female each year, and to determine which of the two alleles at a genetic locus are transmitted from each parent to each offspring. Fecundity is assumed to be independent of age after an animal reaches reproductive age. Mortality rates are specified for each pre-reproductive age-sex class and for reproductive-age animals. Inbreeding depression is modelled as a decrease in viability in inbred animals. The user has the option of modelling density dependence in reproductive rates. As a simple model of density dependence in survival, a carrying capacity is imposed by a probabilistic truncation of each age class if the population size exceeds the specified carrying capacity. VORTEX can model linear trends in the carrying capacity. VORTEX models environmental variation by sampling birth rates, death rates, and the carrying capacity from binomial or normal distributions. Catastrophes are modelled as sporadic random events that reduce survival and reproduction for one year. VORTEX also allows the user to supplement or harvest the population, and multiple subpopulations can be tracked, with user-specified migration among the units. VORTEX outputs summary statistics on population growth rates, the probability of population extinction, the time to extinction, and the mean size and genetic variation in extant populations. VORTEX necessarily makes many assumptions. The model it incorporates is most applicable to species with low fecundity and long lifespans, such as mammals, birds and reptiles. It integrates the interacting effects of many of the deterministic and stochastic processes that have an impact on the viability of small populations, providing opportunity for more complete analysis than is possible by other techniques. PVA by simulation modelling is an important tool for identifying populations at risk of extinction, determining the urgency of action, and evaluating options for management. read more read less

Topics:

Population viability analysis (60%)60% related to the paper, Population size (59%)59% related to the paper, Population (58%)58% related to the paper, Small population size (54%)54% related to the paper, Extinction (54%)54% related to the paper
483 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/WR00033
A review of methods to estimate the abundance of terrestrial carnivores using field signs and observation
12 Apr 2001 - Wildlife Research

Abstract:

This paper reviews field methods for estimating and monitoring the abundance of terrestrial carnivores that do not involve capture. Effective methods of monitoring abundance are important tools for the management and conservation of many species. The development of methods for carnivores presents particular challenges, as the... This paper reviews field methods for estimating and monitoring the abundance of terrestrial carnivores that do not involve capture. Effective methods of monitoring abundance are important tools for the management and conservation of many species. The development of methods for carnivores presents particular challenges, as they are often secretive and widely dispersed. Nevertheless, a variety of approaches based on direct observations and quantification of field signs have been employed. These techniques are described in relation to carnivore ecology and resource implications, and the advantages and deficiencies of each are discussed with reference to case studies. Estindasvore G.ls J W033 Ga J. Rlah read more read less
305 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/WR9880435
Fox control and rock-wallaby population dynamics
J. E. Kinnear, M. L. Onus, R. N. Bromilow
01 Jan 1988 - Wildlife Research

Abstract:

The population dynamics of five remnant rock-wallaby populations (Petrogale lateralis) persisting on granite outcrops in the central wheatbelt region of Western Australia were monitored over a six year period. From 1979 to 1982 all populations remained relatively static or declined for unknown reasons, but circumstantial evid... The population dynamics of five remnant rock-wallaby populations (Petrogale lateralis) persisting on granite outcrops in the central wheatbelt region of Western Australia were monitored over a six year period. From 1979 to 1982 all populations remained relatively static or declined for unknown reasons, but circumstantial evidence implicated fox predation. A fox control program was implemented in 1982 on two outcrops and was maintained for four years with the result that the two resident rock-wallaby populations increased by 138 and 223%. Two rock-wallaby populations occupying sites not subjected to fox control declined by 14 and 85%, and the third population increased by 29%. It was concluded that the fox has probably been a significant factor in the demise and decline of native mammals in the past, and that surviving populations are still at risk. Control of predation pressure on nature reserves was shown to be feasible from a management perspective. read more read less

Topics:

Population (54%)54% related to the paper, Rock-wallaby (53%)53% related to the paper, Population decline (50%)50% related to the paper, Petrogale lateralis (50%)50% related to the paper
275 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/WR98092
The impact of cats and foxes on the small vertebrate fauna of Heirisson Prong, Western Australia. II. A field experiment.
19 May 2000 - Wildlife Research

Abstract:

The hypothesis that predation by feral cats and introduced foxes reduces population sizes of small, native vertebrates was supported by results of a predator-removal experiment at Heirisson Prong, a semi-arid site in Western Australia. The methods of control used against cats and foxes to protect native mammals reintroduced t... The hypothesis that predation by feral cats and introduced foxes reduces population sizes of small, native vertebrates was supported by results of a predator-removal experiment at Heirisson Prong, a semi-arid site in Western Australia. The methods of control used against cats and foxes to protect native mammals reintroduced to Heirisson Prong produced three broad ‘predator zones’: a low-cat and low-fox zone, where foxes were eradicated and spotlight counts of cats declined after intensive cat control; a high-cat and low-fox zone where spotlight counts of cats increased three-fold after foxes were controlled; and a zone where numbers of cats and foxes were not manipulated. Small mammals and reptiles were monitored for one year before and three years after predator control began. Captures of small mammals increased in the low-cat and low-fox zone, but where only foxes were controlled captures of small mammals declined by 80%. In the absence of cat and fox control, captures of small mammals were variable over the sampling period, lower than where both cats and foxes were controlled, yet higher than where only foxes were controlled. The capture success of reptiles did not appear to be related to changes in predator counts. This study presents the first experimental evidence from mainland Australia that feral cats can have a negative impact on populations of small mammals. read more read less

Topics:

Population (51%)51% related to the paper
236 Citations
Author Pic

SciSpace is a very innovative solution to the formatting problem and existing providers, such as Mendeley or Word did not really evolve in recent years.

- Andreas Frutiger, Researcher, ETH Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering

Get MS-Word and LaTeX output to any Journal within seconds
1
Choose a template
Select a template from a library of 40,000+ templates
2
Import a MS-Word file or start fresh
It takes only few seconds to import
3
View and edit your final output
SciSpace will automatically format your output to meet journal guidelines
4
Submit directly or Download
Submit to journal directly or Download in PDF, MS Word or LaTeX

(Before submission check for plagiarism via Turnitin)

clock Less than 3 minutes

What to expect from SciSpace?

Speed and accuracy over MS Word

''

With SciSpace, you do not need a word template for Wildlife Research.

It automatically formats your research paper to CSIRO Publishing formatting guidelines and citation style.

You can download a submission ready research paper in pdf, LaTeX and docx formats.

Time comparison

Time taken to format a paper and Compliance with guidelines

Plagiarism Reports via Turnitin

SciSpace has partnered with Turnitin, the leading provider of Plagiarism Check software.

Using this service, researchers can compare submissions against more than 170 million scholarly articles, a database of 70+ billion current and archived web pages. How Turnitin Integration works?

Turnitin Stats
Publisher Logos

Freedom from formatting guidelines

One editor, 100K journal formats – world's largest collection of journal templates

With such a huge verified library, what you need is already there.

publisher-logos

Easy support from all your favorite tools

Wildlife Research format uses CSIRO Custom Citation citation style.

Automatically format and order your citations and bibliography in a click.

SciSpace allows imports from all reference managers like Mendeley, Zotero, Endnote, Google Scholar etc.

Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Wildlife Research guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Wildlife Research citation style.

You can avail our Free Trial for 7 days. I'm sure you'll find our features very helpful. Plus, it's quite inexpensive.

Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Wildlife Research's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it up and running within a matter of 3 working days. You can find the request box in the Journal Gallery on the right sidebar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for?".

After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

Our journal submission experts are skilled in submitting papers to various international journals.

After uploading your paper on SciSpace, you would see a button to request a journal submission service for Wildlife Research.

Each submission service is completed within 4 - 5 working days.

Yes. SciSpace provides this functionality.

After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Wildlife Research Endnote style, according to csiro-publishing guidelines.

Fast and reliable,
built for complaince.

Instant formatting to 100% publisher guidelines on - SciSpace.

Available only on desktops 🖥

No word template required

Typset automatically formats your research paper to Wildlife Research formatting guidelines and citation style.

Verifed journal formats

One editor, 100K journal formats.
With the largest collection of verified journal formats, what you need is already there.

Trusted by academicians

I spent hours with MS word for reformatting. It was frustrating - plain and simple. With SciSpace, I can draft my manuscripts and once it is finished I can just submit. In case, I have to submit to another journal it is really just a button click instead of an afternoon of reformatting.

Andreas Frutiger
Researcher & Ex MS Word user
Use this template