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Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format Example of Aquacultural Engineering format
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open access Open Access

Aquacultural Engineering — Template for authors

Publisher: Elsevier
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Aquatic Science #29 of 224 up up by 36 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 216 Published Papers | 1087 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 01/06/2020
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open access Open Access

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Quality:  
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Journal Performance & Insights

CiteRatio

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

5.0

16% from 2019

CiteRatio for Aquacultural Engineering from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 5.0
2019 4.3
2018 3.5
2017 3.1
2016 3.4
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

0.767

4% from 2019

SJR for Aquacultural Engineering from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.767
2019 0.8
2018 0.907
2017 0.705
2016 0.824
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

1.955

25% from 2019

SNIP for Aquacultural Engineering from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.955
2019 1.558
2018 1.33
2017 1.259
2016 1.524
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 16% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 25% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Aquacultural Engineering

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Elsevier

Aquacultural Engineering

Aquacultural Engineering is concerned with the design and development of effective aquacultural systems for marine and freshwater facilities. The journal aims to apply the knowledge gained from basic research which potentially can be translated into commercial operations. Prob...... Read More

Aquatic Science

Agricultural and Biological Sciences

i
Last updated on
01 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0144-8609
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Impact Factor
High - 1.599
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
elsarticle-num
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
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Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, T. M. Klapwijk, Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25 (7) (1982) 4515–4532. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.AQUAENG.2010.09.002
New developments in recirculating aquaculture systems in Europe: A perspective on environmental sustainability
01 Nov 2010 - Aquacultural Engineering

Abstract:

The dual objective of sustainable aquaculture, i.e., to produce food while sustaining natural resources is achieved only when production systems with a minimum ecological impact are used. Recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs) provide opportunities to reduce water usage and to improve waste management and nutrient recycling... The dual objective of sustainable aquaculture, i.e., to produce food while sustaining natural resources is achieved only when production systems with a minimum ecological impact are used. Recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs) provide opportunities to reduce water usage and to improve waste management and nutrient recycling. RAS makes intensive fish production compatible with environmental sustainability. This review aims to summarize the most recent developments within RAS that have contributed to the environmental sustainability of the European aquaculture sector. The review first shows the ongoing expansion of RAS production by species and country in Europe. Life cycle analysis showed that feed, fish production and waste and energy are the principal components explaining the ecological impact of RAS. Ongoing developments in RAS show two trends focusing on: (1) technical improvements within the recirculation loop and (2) recycling of nutrients through integrated farming. Both trends contributed to improvements in the environmental sustainability of RAS. Developments within the recirculation loop that are reviewed are the introduction of denitrification reactors, sludge thickening technologies and the use of ozone. New approached towards integrated systems include the incorporation of wetlands and algal controlled systems in RAS. Finally, the review identifies the key research priorities that will contribute to the future reduction of the ecological impact of RAS. Possible future breakthroughs in the fields of waste production and removal might further enhance the sustainabilty of fish production in RAS. read more read less

Topics:

Recirculating aquaculture system (55%)55% related to the paper, Sustainability (54%)54% related to the paper
View PDF
560 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.AQUAENG.2005.04.004
Denitrification in recirculating systems: Theory and applications
Jaap van Rijn1, Yossi Tal2, Harold J. Schreier3, Harold J. Schreier2
01 May 2006 - Aquacultural Engineering

Abstract:

Profitability of recirculating systems depends in part on the ability to manage nutrient wastes. Nitrogenous wastes in these systems can be eliminated through nitrifying and denitrifying biofilters. While nitrifying filters are incorporated in most recirculating systems according to well-established protocols, denitrifying fi... Profitability of recirculating systems depends in part on the ability to manage nutrient wastes. Nitrogenous wastes in these systems can be eliminated through nitrifying and denitrifying biofilters. While nitrifying filters are incorporated in most recirculating systems according to well-established protocols, denitrifying filters are still under development. By means of denitrification, oxidized inorganic nitrogen compounds, such as nitrite and nitrate are reduced to elemental nitrogen (N2). The process is conducted by facultative anaerobic microorganisms with electron donors derived from either organic (heterotrophic denitrification) or inorganic sources (autotrophic denitrification). In recirculating systems and traditional wastewater treatment plants, heterotrophic denitrification often is applied using external electron and carbon donors (e.g. carbohydrates, organic alcohols) or endogenous organic donors originating from the waste. In addition to nitrate removal, denitrifying organisms are associated with other processes relevant to water quality control in aquaculture systems. Denitrification raises the alkalinity and, hence, replenishes some of the inorganic carbon lost through nitrification. Organic carbon discharge from recirculating systems is reduced when endogenous carbon sources originating from the fish waste are used to fuel denitrification. In addition to the carbon cycle, denitrifiers also are associated with sulfur and phosphorus cycles in recirculating systems. Orthophosphate uptake by some denitrifiers takes place in excess of their metabolic requirements and may result in a considerable reduction of orthophosphate from the culture water. Finally, autotrophic denitrifiers may prevent the accumulation of toxic sulfide resulting from sulfate reduction in marine recirculating systems. Information on nitrate removal in recirculating systems is limited to studies with small-scale experimental systems. Packed bed reactors supplemented with external carbon sources are used most widely for nitrate removal in these systems. Although studies on the application of denitrification in freshwater and marine recirculating systems were initiated some thirty years ago, a unifying concept for the design and operation of denitrifying biofilters in recirculating systems is lacking. read more read less

Topics:

Denitrifying bacteria (63%)63% related to the paper, Denitrification (62%)62% related to the paper, Aerobic denitrification (62%)62% related to the paper, Nitrification (55%)55% related to the paper, Biofilter (53%)53% related to the paper
517 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.AQUAENG.2006.04.001
Production of microalgal concentrates by flocculation and their assessment as aquaculture feeds
Richard Knuckey, Malcolm R. Brown1, René Robert2, Dion Matthew Frederick Frampton1
01 Oct 2006 - Aquacultural Engineering

Abstract:

A novel technique was developed for the flocculation of marine microalgae commonly used in aquaculture. The process entailed an adjustment of pH of culture to between 10 and 10.6 using NaOH, followed by addition of a non-ionic polymer Magnafloc LT-25 to a final concentration of 0.5 mg L-1. The ensuing flocculate was harvested... A novel technique was developed for the flocculation of marine microalgae commonly used in aquaculture. The process entailed an adjustment of pH of culture to between 10 and 10.6 using NaOH, followed by addition of a non-ionic polymer Magnafloc LT-25 to a final concentration of 0.5 mg L-1. The ensuing flocculate was harvested, and neutralised giving a final concentration factor of between 200- and 800-fold. This process was successfully applied to harvest cells of Chaetoceros calcitrans, C. muelleri, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Attheya septentrionalis, Nitzschia closterium, Skeletonema sp., Tetraselmis suecica and Rhodomonas salina, with efficiencies >=80%. The process was rapid, simple and inexpensive, and relatively cost neutral with increasing volume (cf. concentration by centrifugation). Harvested material was readily disaggregated to single cell suspensions by dilution in seawater and mild agitation. Microscopic examination of the cells showed them to be indistinguishable from corresponding non-flocculated cells. Chlorophyll analysis of concentrates prepared from cultures of Concentrates of T. pseudonana prepared using pH-induced flocculation gave better growth of juvenile Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) than concentrates prepared by ferric flocculation, or centrifuged concentrates using a cream separator or laboratory centrifuge. In follow up experiments, concentrates prepared from 1000 L Chaetoceros muelleri cultures were effective as supplementary diets to improve the growth of juvenile C. gigas and the scallop Pecten fumatus reared under commercial conditions, though not as effective as the corresponding live algae. The experiments demonstrated a proof-of-concept for a commercial application of concentrates prepared by flocculation, especially for use at a remote nursery without on-site mass-algal culture facilities. read more read less

Topics:

Tetraselmis suecica (53%)53% related to the paper, Flocculation (51%)51% related to the paper, Attheya septentrionalis (50%)50% related to the paper
View PDF
386 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.AQUAENG.2005.08.009
Photosynthetic suspended-growth systems in aquaculture
John A. Hargreaves1
01 May 2006 - Aquacultural Engineering

Abstract:

Standardized evaluation and rating of biofilters for aquaculture should be assessed in the context of the economic efficiency of ecological services (waste assimilation, nutrient recycling, and internal food production) provided by earthen ponds, and the availability and cost of land, water, and electrical energy resources re... Standardized evaluation and rating of biofilters for aquaculture should be assessed in the context of the economic efficiency of ecological services (waste assimilation, nutrient recycling, and internal food production) provided by earthen ponds, and the availability and cost of land, water, and electrical energy resources required to support particular classes of production systems. In photosynthetic suspended-growth systems, water quality control is achieved by a combination of natural and mechanical processes. Natural processes include photosynthesis of oxygen, algal nutrient uptake, coupled nitrification-denitrification, and organic matter oxidation; mechanical processes include aeration and water circulation. Ammonia is controlled by a combination of phytoplankton uptake, nitrification, and immobilization by bacteria. Unlike biofilters for recirculating aquaculture systems, unit processes are combined and are an integral part of the culture unit. The important design and operational considerations for photosynthetic suspended-growth systems include temperature effects, aeration and mixing, quantity and quality of loaded organic matter, and fish water quality tolerance limits. The principle advantages of photosynthetic suspended-growth systems are lower capital costs relative to other recirculating aquaculture systems and increased control over stock management relative to conventional static ponds. The main disadvantage is the relatively low degree of control over water quality and phytoplankton density, metabolism, and community composition relative to other recirculating aquaculture systems. Examples of photosynthetic suspended-growth systems include semi-intensive ponds, intensively aerated outdoor lined ponds, combined intensive-extensive ponds, partitioned aquaculture systems, greenwater tanks, greenwater tanks with solids removal, and greenwater recirculating aquaculture systems. read more read less

Topics:

Aquaculture engineering (61%)61% related to the paper, Aquaculture (52%)52% related to the paper, Biofilter (52%)52% related to the paper, Water quality (50%)50% related to the paper
382 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.AQUAENG.2005.04.002
Design and operations of the Kaldnes moving bed biofilm reactors
Bjørn Rusten, Bjørnar Eikebrokk1, Yngve Ulgenes1, Eivind Lygren
01 May 2006 - Aquacultural Engineering

Abstract:

The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was developed in Norway in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It is covered by several patents and has been a huge success world-wide for treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. In addition, MBBRs have been successfully used for biological treatment of drinking water as well as fo... The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was developed in Norway in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It is covered by several patents and has been a huge success world-wide for treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. In addition, MBBRs have been successfully used for biological treatment of drinking water as well as for water treatment in fish farms. The MBBRs use plastic biofilm carriers of a unique design, to maximize the active biofilm surface area in the reactors. Reactors have insignificant headloss, no need for periodic backwashing and no susceptibility for clogging. This paper describes the fundamentals of the MBBR. It has a major emphasis on nitrification with the type of biofilm carrier used in fish farms, but briefly touches upon removal of organic matter and denitrification. Major factors influencing the nitrification rates in MBBRs are discussed in detail. Results from small-scale MBBR tests, as well as from commercially operated MBBRs at full scale fish farms are presented. The data are from both freshwater and marine applications. read more read less

Topics:

Moving bed biofilm reactor (63%)63% related to the paper
359 Citations
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3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Aquacultural Engineering?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Aquacultural Engineering citation style.

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Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Aquacultural Engineering.

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After writing your paper autoformatting in Aquacultural Engineering, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Aquacultural Engineering's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Aquacultural Engineering?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Aquacultural Engineering. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Aquacultural Engineering?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Aquacultural Engineering are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

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16. Can I download Aquacultural Engineering in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Aquacultural Engineering Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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