Example of Computers in Human Behavior format
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Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format
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Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format Example of Computers in Human Behavior format
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open access Open Access
recommended Recommended

Computers in Human Behavior — Template for authors

Publisher: Elsevier
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous) #2 of 306 up up by 4 ranks
Psychology (all) #5 of 203 up up by 7 ranks
Human-Computer Interaction #5 of 120 up up by 4 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 1934 Published Papers | 26743 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 10/06/2020
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Related Journals

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SJR: 0.641
SNIP: 1.243
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Journal Performance & Insights

CiteRatio

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

13.8

14% from 2019

CiteRatio for Computers in Human Behavior from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 13.8
2019 12.1
2018 9.4
2017 7.4
2016 6.2
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

2.108

3% from 2019

SJR for Computers in Human Behavior from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.108
2019 2.173
2018 1.711
2017 1.555
2016 1.663
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

3.151

2% from 2019

SNIP for Computers in Human Behavior from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 3.151
2019 3.079
2018 2.418
2017 2.182
2016 2.261
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 14% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 3% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Computers in Human Behavior

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Elsevier

Computers in Human Behavior

Computers in Human Behavior is a scholarly journal dedicated to examining the use of computers from a psychological perspective. Original theoretical works, research reports, literature reviews, software reviews, book reviews and announcements are published. The journal addres...... Read More

Arts and Humanities

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Last updated on
09 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0747-5632
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Impact Factor
High - 2.406
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Open Access
No
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
elsarticle-num
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
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Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, T. M. Klapwijk, Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25 (7) (1982) 4515–4532. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/S0747-5632(00)00041-8
A cognitive-behavioral model of pathological Internet use
R.A. Davis1

Abstract:

This article introduces a cognitive-behavioral model of Pathological Internet Use (PIU). While previous studies on Internet addiction have described behavioral factors, such as withdrawal and tolerance, the present article focuses on the maladaptive cognitions associated with PIU. The cognitive-behavioral model of PIU disting... This article introduces a cognitive-behavioral model of Pathological Internet Use (PIU). While previous studies on Internet addiction have described behavioral factors, such as withdrawal and tolerance, the present article focuses on the maladaptive cognitions associated with PIU. The cognitive-behavioral model of PIU distinguishes between specific PIU and generalized PIU. Specific PIU refers to the condition in which an individual pathologically uses the Internet for a particular purpose, such as online sex or online gambling, whereas generalized PIU describes a more global set of behaviors. The model implies a more important role of cognitions in PIU, and describes the means by which PIU is both developed and maintained. Furthermore, it provides a framework for the development of cognitive-behavioral interventions for PIU. read more read less

Topics:

Internet addiction disorder (51%)51% related to the paper
1,853 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.CHB.2004.03.003
Toward an understanding of the behavioral intention to use mobile banking
Pin Luarn1, Hsin-Hui Lin1

Abstract:

Although millions of dollars have been spent on building mobile banking systems, reports on mobile banking show that potential users may not be using the systems, despite their availability. Thus, research is needed to identify the factors determining users' acceptance of mobile banking. While there has been considerable rese... Although millions of dollars have been spent on building mobile banking systems, reports on mobile banking show that potential users may not be using the systems, despite their availability. Thus, research is needed to identify the factors determining users' acceptance of mobile banking. While there has been considerable research on the technology acceptance model (TAM) that predicts whether individuals will accept and voluntarily use information systems, limitations of the TAM include the omission of an important trust-based construct in the context of electronic/mobile commerce, and the assumption that there are no barriers preventing an individual from using an IS if he or she chooses to do so. Based on literature relating to the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the TAM, this study extends the applicability of the TAM in a mobile banking context, by adding one trust-based construct (“perceived credibility”) and two resource-based constructs (“perceived self-efficacy” and “perceived financial cost”) to the model, while paying careful attention to the placing of these constructs in the TAM's existing nomological structure. Data collected from 180 users in Taiwan were tested against the extended TAM, using the structural equation modeling approach. The results strongly support the extended TAM in predicting users' intentions to adopt mobile banking. Several implications for IT/IS acceptance research and mobile banking management practices are discussed. read more read less

Topics:

Mobile banking (62%)62% related to the paper, Technology acceptance model (57%)57% related to the paper, Mobile commerce (56%)56% related to the paper
1,680 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.CHB.2009.11.014
Review: Following you home from school: A critical review and synthesis of research on cyberbullying victimization
Robert S. Tokunaga1

Abstract:

More than 97% of youths in the United States are connected to the Internet in some way. An unintended outcome of the Internet's pervasive reach is the growing rate of harmful offenses against children and teens. Cyberbullying victimization is one such offense that has recently received a fair amount of attention. The present ... More than 97% of youths in the United States are connected to the Internet in some way. An unintended outcome of the Internet's pervasive reach is the growing rate of harmful offenses against children and teens. Cyberbullying victimization is one such offense that has recently received a fair amount of attention. The present report synthesizes findings from quantitative research on cyberbullying victimization. An integrative definition for the term cyberbullying is provided, differences between traditional bullying and cyberbullying are explained, areas of convergence and divergence are offered, and sampling and/or methodological explanations for the inconsistencies in the literature are considered. About 20-40% of all youths have experienced cyberbullying at least once in their lives. Demographic variables such as age and gender do not appear to predict cyberbullying victimization. Evidence suggests that victimization is associated with serious psychosocial, affective, and academic problems. The report concludes by outlining several areas of concern in cyberbullying research and discusses ways that future research can remedy them. read more read less

Topics:

Victimisation (50%)50% related to the paper
1,657 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.CHB.2009.09.003
Who interacts on the Web?: The intersection of users' personality and social media use
Teresa Correa1, Amber Hinsley1, Homero Gil de Zúñiga1

Abstract:

In the increasingly user-generated Web, users' personality traits may be crucial factors leading them to engage in this participatory media. The literature suggests factors such as extraversion, emotional stability and openness to experience are related to uses of social applications on the Internet. Using a national sample o... In the increasingly user-generated Web, users' personality traits may be crucial factors leading them to engage in this participatory media. The literature suggests factors such as extraversion, emotional stability and openness to experience are related to uses of social applications on the Internet. Using a national sample of US adults, this study investigated the relationship between these three dimensions of the Big-Five model and social media use (defined as use of social networking sites and instant messages). It also examined whether gender and age played a role in that dynamic. Results revealed that while extraversion and openness to experiences were positively related to social media use, emotional stability was a negative predictor, controlling for socio-demographics and life satisfaction. These findings differed by gender and age. While extraverted men and women were both likely to be more frequent users of social media tools, only the men with greater degrees of emotional instability were more regular users. The relationship between extraversion and social media use was particularly important among the young adult cohort. Conversely, being open to new experiences emerged as an important personality predictor of social media use for the more mature segment of the sample. read more read less

Topics:

Social relation (60%)60% related to the paper, Big Five personality traits (59%)59% related to the paper, Personality (57%)57% related to the paper, Openness to experience (57%)57% related to the paper, Social media (56%)56% related to the paper
1,602 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.CHB.2008.12.024
Personality and motivations associated with Facebook use
Craig Ross1, Emily S. Orr1, Mia Sisic1, Jaime M. Arseneault1, Mary G. Simmering1, R. Robert Orr1

Abstract:

Facebook is quickly becoming one of the most popular tools for social communication. However, Facebook is somewhat different from other Social Networking Sites as it demonstrates an offline-to-online trend; that is, the majority of Facebook Friends are met offline and then added later. The present research investigated how th... Facebook is quickly becoming one of the most popular tools for social communication. However, Facebook is somewhat different from other Social Networking Sites as it demonstrates an offline-to-online trend; that is, the majority of Facebook Friends are met offline and then added later. The present research investigated how the Five-Factor Model of personality relates to Facebook use. Despite some expected trends regarding Extraversion and Openness to Experience, results indicated that personality factors were not as influential as previous literature would suggest. The results also indicated that a motivation to communicate was influential in terms of Facebook use. It is suggested that different motivations may be influential in the decision to use tools such as Facebook, especially when individual functions of Facebook are being considered. read more read less

Topics:

Cyberpsychology (60%)60% related to the paper, Personality (53%)53% related to the paper, Big Five personality traits (51%)51% related to the paper, Openness to experience (51%)51% related to the paper
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1,570 Citations
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Computers in Human Behavior format uses elsarticle-num citation style.

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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write Computers in Human Behavior in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Computers in Human Behavior guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Computers in Human Behavior guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Computers in Human Behavior guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Computers in Human Behavior?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Computers in Human Behavior citation style.

4. Can I use the Computers in Human Behavior templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Computers in Human Behavior.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Computers in Human Behavior that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Computers in Human Behavior that you can download at the end.

6. How long does it usually take you to format my papers in Computers in Human Behavior?

It only takes a matter of seconds to edit your manuscript. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves you from writing and formatting it in Computers in Human Behavior.

7. Where can I find the template for the Computers in Human Behavior?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Computers in Human Behavior's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

8. Can I reformat my paper to fit the Computers in Human Behavior's guidelines?

Of course! You can do this using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, our support team is always ready to assist you.

9. Computers in Human Behavior an online tool or is there a desktop version?

SciSpace's Computers in Human Behavior is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

10. I cannot find my template in your gallery. Can you create it for me like Computers in Human Behavior?

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it setup within a few days. You can find the request box in Journal Gallery on the right side bar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for like Computers in Human Behavior?”

11. What is the output that I would get after using Computers in Human Behavior?

After writing your paper autoformatting in Computers in Human Behavior, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Computers in Human Behavior's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Computers in Human Behavior?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Computers in Human Behavior. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Computers in Human Behavior?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Computers in Human Behavior are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Computers in Human Behavior?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Computers in Human Behavior's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

16. Can I download Computers in Human Behavior in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Computers in Human Behavior Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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I spent hours with MS word for reformatting. It was frustrating - plain and simple. With SciSpace, I can draft my manuscripts and once it is finished I can just submit. In case, I have to submit to another journal it is really just a button click instead of an afternoon of reformatting.

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