Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format
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Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format
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Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format Example of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging format
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open access Open Access
recommended Recommended

JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging — Template for authors

Publisher: Elsevier
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging #4 of 288 down down by 2 ranks
Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine #9 of 317 down down by 2 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 594 Published Papers | 9953 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 18/07/2020
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Elsevier

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CiteRatio: 8.3
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Journal Performance & Insights

Impact Factor

CiteRatio

Determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

12.74

16% from 2018

Impact factor for JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 12.74
2018 10.975
2017 10.247
2016 10.189
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

16.8

14% from 2019

CiteRatio for JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 16.8
2019 14.8
2018 14.4
2017 14.0
2016 13.6
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 16% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 14% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

5.79

18% from 2019

SJR for JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 5.79
2019 4.902
2018 5.102
2017 4.66
2016 5.038
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

3.409

13% from 2019

SNIP for JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 3.409
2019 3.029
2018 2.723
2017 2.77
2016 2.741
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 18% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 13% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.
JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging

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Elsevier

JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging

JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging provides readers with a broad, balanced view of all aspects of cardiovascular imaging. The Journal includes original clinical research on non-invasive and invasive imaging techniques including echocardiography, CT, CMR, nuclear, optical imaging, an...... Read More

Medicine

i
Last updated on
18 Jul 2020
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ISSN
1936-878X
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Impact Factor
High - 2.101
i
Acceptance Rate
15%
i
Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
elsarticle-num
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
i
Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, T. M. Klapwijk, Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25 (7) (1982) 4515–4532. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.JCMG.2008.12.031
Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Absence of Coronary Artery Calcification

Abstract:

Objectives In this study, we systematically assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of absence of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals Background Presence of CAC is a well-established marker of coronary plaque burden and is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular... Objectives In this study, we systematically assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of absence of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals Background Presence of CAC is a well-established marker of coronary plaque burden and is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes Absence of CAC has been suggested to be associated with a very low risk of significant coronary artery disease, as well as minimal risk of future events Methods We searched online databases (eg, PubMed and MEDLINE) for original research articles published in English between January 1990 and March 2008 examining the diagnostic and prognostic utility of CAC Results A systematic review of published articles revealed 49 studies that fulfilled our criteria for inclusion These included 13 studies assessing the relationship of CAC with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in 64,873 asymptomatic patients In this cohort, 146 of 25,903 patients without CAC (056%) had a cardiovascular event during a mean follow-up period of 51 months In the 7 studies assessing the prognostic value of CAC in a symptomatic population, 180% of patients without CAC had a cardiovascular event Overall, 18 studies demonstrated that the presence of any CAC had a pooled sensitivity and negative predictive value of 98% and 93%, respectively, for detection of significant coronary artery disease on invasive coronary angiography In 4,870 individuals undergoing myocardial perfusion and CAC testing, in the absence of CAC, only 6% demonstrated any sign of ischemia Finally, 3 studies demonstrated that absence of CAC had a negative predictive value of 99% for ruling out acute coronary syndrome Conclusions On the basis of our review of more than 85,000 patients, we conclude that the absence of CAC is associated with a very low risk of future cardiovascular events, with modest incremental value of other diagnostic tests in this very low-risk group read more read less

Topics:

Coronary artery disease (56%)56% related to the paper, Acute coronary syndrome (53%)53% related to the paper, Predictive value of tests (52%)52% related to the paper, Population (50%)50% related to the paper
535 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.JCMG.2010.10.008
Left ventricular remodeling in heart failure: current concepts in clinical significance and assessment.
Marvin A. Konstam1, Daniel G. Kramer1, Ayan R. Patel1, Martin S. Maron1, James E. Udelson1

Abstract:

Ventricular remodeling, first described in animal models of left ventricular (LV) stress and injury, occurs progressively in untreated patients after large myocardial infarction and in those with dilated forms of cardiomyopathy. The gross pathologic changes of increased LV volume and perturbation in the normal elliptical LV c... Ventricular remodeling, first described in animal models of left ventricular (LV) stress and injury, occurs progressively in untreated patients after large myocardial infarction and in those with dilated forms of cardiomyopathy. The gross pathologic changes of increased LV volume and perturbation in the normal elliptical LV chamber configuration is driven, on a histologic level, by myocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis and by increased interstitial collagen. Each of the techniques used for tracking this process—echocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography, and cardiac magnetic resonance—carries advantages and disadvantages. Numerous investigations have demonstrated the value of LV volume measurement at a single time-point and over time in predicting clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure and in those after myocardial infarction. The structural pattern of LV remodeling and evidence of scarring on cardiac magnetic resonance have additional prognostic value. Beyond the impact of abnormal cardiac structure on cardiovascular events, the relationship between LV remodeling and clinical outcomes is likely linked through common local and systemic factors driving vascular as well as myocardial pathology. As demonstrated by a recent meta-analysis of heart failure trials, LV volume stands out among surrogate markers as strongly correlating with the impact of a particular drug or device therapy on patient survival. These findings substantiate the importance of ventricular remodeling as central in the pathophysiology of advancing heart failure and support the role of measures of LV remodeling in the clinical investigation of novel heart failure treatments. read more read less

Topics:

Ventricular remodeling (67%)67% related to the paper, Heart failure (59%)59% related to the paper, Cardiomyopathy (58%)58% related to the paper, Myocardial infarction (57%)57% related to the paper, Radionuclide ventriculography (57%)57% related to the paper
490 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.JCMG.2007.12.006
Noninvasive Evaluation of the Aortic Root With Multislice Computed Tomography : Implications for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

Abstract:

Objectives In the present study, the anatomy of the aortic root was assessed noninvasively with multislice computed tomography (MSCT). Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been proposed as an alternative to surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. For this procedure, detailed knowledge of ao... Objectives In the present study, the anatomy of the aortic root was assessed noninvasively with multislice computed tomography (MSCT). Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been proposed as an alternative to surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. For this procedure, detailed knowledge of aortic annulus diameters and the relation between the annulus and the coronary arteries is needed. Methods In 169 patients (111 men, age 54 ± 11 years), a 64-slice MSCT scan was performed for evaluation of coronary artery disease. Of these, 150 patients had no or mild aortic stenosis, and 19 patients had moderate to severe aortic stenosis. Reconstructed coronal and sagittal views were used for assessment of the aortic annulus diameter in 2 directions. In addition, the distance between the annulus and the ostium of the right and left coronary arteries and the length of the coronary leaflets were assessed. The LV outflow tract and interventricular septum were analyzed on the single oblique sagittal view at end-diastole. Results The diameter of the aortic annulus was 26.3 ± 2.8 mm on the coronal view, and 23.5 ± 2.7 mm on the sagittal view. Mean difference between the 2 diameters was 2.9 ± 1.8 mm, indicating an oval shape of the aortic annulus. Mean distance between the aortic annulus and the ostium of the right coronary artery was 17.2 ± 3.3 mm, and mean distance between the annulus and the ostium of the left coronary artery was 14.4 ± 2.9 mm. In 82 patients (49%), the length of the left coronary leaflet exceeded the distance between the annulus and the ostium of the left coronary artery. There were no significant differences in the diameter of annulus, diameter of sinus of Valsalva, or the distance between the annulus, left coronary leaflet, and the ostium of the left coronary artery, between the patient with and without severe aortic stenosis. Conclusions The MSCT can provide detailed information on the shape of the aortic annulus and the relation between the annulus and the ostia of the coronary arteries. Thereby, MSCT may be helpful for avoiding paravalvular leakage and coronary occlusion and may facilitate the selection of candidates for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. read more read less

Topics:

Left coronary artery (64%)64% related to the paper, Coronary arteries (61%)61% related to the paper, Right coronary artery (61%)61% related to the paper, Ostium (59%)59% related to the paper, Coronary occlusion (57%)57% related to the paper
488 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.JCMG.2008.02.006
Twist Mechanics of the Left Ventricle: Principles and Application
Partho P. Sengupta1, A. Jamil Tajik1, Krishnaswamy Chandrasekaran1, Bijoy K. Khandheria1

Abstract:

Left ventricular (LV) twist or torsion represents the mean longitudinal gradient of the net difference in clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of the LV apex and base, as viewed from LV apex. Twist during ejection predominantly deforms the subendocardial fiber matrix, resulting in storage of potential energy. Subsequent re... Left ventricular (LV) twist or torsion represents the mean longitudinal gradient of the net difference in clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of the LV apex and base, as viewed from LV apex. Twist during ejection predominantly deforms the subendocardial fiber matrix, resulting in storage of potential energy. Subsequent recoil of twist deformation is associated with the release of restoring forces, which contributes to LV diastolic relaxation and early diastolic filling. Noninvasive techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are useful for understanding LV twist dynamics in clinical settings, and data regarding their relative merits and pitfalls are rapidly accumulating. This review is a focused update on the current and evolving applications of LV twist mechanics in clinical cardiology. First, the theoretical framework for understanding the physiological sequence of LV twist during a cardiac cycle is presented. Second, variations in LV twist encountered in different experimental and clinical situations are discussed. Finally, the review presents an algorithm for routine application of LV twist in clinical differentiation of patterns of LV dysfunction encountered in day-to-day practice. read more read less
480 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.JCMG.2007.12.007
Myocardial strain measurement with 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography: definition of normal range.

Abstract:

The interpretation of wall motion is an important component of echocardiography but remains a source of variation between observers. It has been believed that automated quantification of left ventricular (LV) systolic function by measurement of LV systolic strain from speckle-tracking echocardiography might be helpful. This m... The interpretation of wall motion is an important component of echocardiography but remains a source of variation between observers. It has been believed that automated quantification of left ventricular (LV) systolic function by measurement of LV systolic strain from speckle-tracking echocardiography might be helpful. This multicenter study of nearly 250 volunteers without evidence of cardiovascular disease showed an average LV peak systolic strain of −18.6 ± 0.1%. Although strain was influenced by weight, blood pressure, and heart rate, these features accounted for only 16% of variance. However, there was significant segmental variation of regional strain to necessitate the use of site-specific normal ranges. read more read less

Topics:

Speckle tracking echocardiography (62%)62% related to the paper
463 Citations
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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging citation style.

4. Can I use the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

5. Can I use a manuscript in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging that you can download at the end.

6. How long does it usually take you to format my papers in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging?

It only takes a matter of seconds to edit your manuscript. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves you from writing and formatting it in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

7. Where can I find the template for the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

8. Can I reformat my paper to fit the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging's guidelines?

Of course! You can do this using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, our support team is always ready to assist you.

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SciSpace's JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

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11. What is the output that I would get after using JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging?

After writing your paper autoformatting in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging?

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16. Can I download JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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