Example of Journal of Structural Geology format
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Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format
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Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format Example of Journal of Structural Geology format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 1918141

Journal of Structural Geology — Template for authors

Publisher: Elsevier
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Geology #43 of 251 down down by 8 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 697 Published Papers | 3808 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 08/06/2020
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Journal Performance & Insights

  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

5.5

10% from 2019

CiteRatio for Journal of Structural Geology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 5.5
2019 5.0
2018 4.6
2017 4.9
2016 4.5
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 10% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

1.533

7% from 2019

SJR for Journal of Structural Geology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.533
2019 1.431
2018 1.331
2017 1.615
2016 1.545
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 7% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.602

15% from 2019

SNIP for Journal of Structural Geology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.602
2019 1.395
2018 1.512
2017 1.319
2016 1.213
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 15% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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CiteRatio: 4.5 | SJR: 0.641 | SNIP: 1.11

Journal of Structural Geology

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Elsevier

Journal of Structural Geology

The Journal of Structural Geology publishes on the structural geology of the Earth and other planets and moons, including related contributions in rheology, geophysics, geochemistry, geodynamics, and tectonics. Papers may cover applied aspects of structural geology such as str...... Read More

Geology

Earth and Planetary Sciences

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Last updated on
08 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0191-8141
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Impact Factor
High - 1.333
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Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
elsarticle-num
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
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Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, T. M. Klapwijk, Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25 (7) (1982) 4515–4532. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0191-8141(79)90019-1
Orthogneiss, mylonite and non coaxial deformation of granites: the example of the South Armorican Shear Zone
D. Berthé1, Pierre Choukroune1, Pierre Jégouzo1

Abstract:

The deformation of two granitic massifs along a dextral wrench fault zone (the South Armorican Shear Zone) is examined at the sample and grain scales. We note that an association of continuous-discontinuous deformation mechanisms is responsible for the mylonitisation at the grain scale. The general characteristics of the defo... The deformation of two granitic massifs along a dextral wrench fault zone (the South Armorican Shear Zone) is examined at the sample and grain scales. We note that an association of continuous-discontinuous deformation mechanisms is responsible for the mylonitisation at the grain scale. The general characteristics of the deformation (strain, ellipsoid type, strain regime, non-coaxial model) and quartz fabrics measured in these mylonites at each of the mylonitisation stages described, are also discussed. read more read less

Topics:

Shear zone (66%)66% related to the paper, Mylonite (58%)58% related to the paper, Deformation mechanism (54%)54% related to the paper, Deformation (meteorology) (53%)53% related to the paper, Mica fish (51%)51% related to the paper
1,172 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/S0191-8141(02)00035-4
The eastern Tonale fault zone: a ‘natural laboratory’ for crystal plastic deformation of quartz over a temperature range from 250 to 700 °C
Michael Stipp1, Holger Stünitz1, Renée Heilbronner1, Stefan M. Schmid1

Abstract:

Near the eastern end of the Tonale fault zone, a segment of the Periadriatic fault system in the Italian Alps, the Adamello intrusion produced a syn-kinematic contact aureole. A temperature gradient from ∼250 to ∼700 °C was determined across the Tonale fault zone using critical syn-kinematic mineral assemblages from the metas... Near the eastern end of the Tonale fault zone, a segment of the Periadriatic fault system in the Italian Alps, the Adamello intrusion produced a syn-kinematic contact aureole. A temperature gradient from ∼250 to ∼700 °C was determined across the Tonale fault zone using critical syn-kinematic mineral assemblages from the metasedimentary host rocks surrounding deformed quartz veins. Deformed quartz veins sampled along this temperature gradient display a transition from cataclasites to mylonites (frictional–viscous transition) at 280±30 °C. Within the mylonites, zones characterized by different dynamic recrystallization mechanisms were defined: Bulging recrystallization (BLG) was dominant between ∼280 and ∼400 °C, subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR) in the ∼400–500 °C interval, and the transition to dominant grain boundary migration recrystallization (GBM) occurred at ∼500 °C. The microstructures associated with the three recrystallization mechanisms and the transitions between them can be correlated with experimentally derived dislocation creep regimes. Bulk texture X-ray goniometry and computer-automated analysis of preferred [c]-axis orientations of porphyroclasts and recrystallized grains are used to quantify textural differences that correspond to the observed microstructural changes. Within the BLG- and SGR zones, porphyroclasts show predominantly single [c]-axis maxima. At the transition from the SGR- to the GBM zone, the texture of recrystallized grains indicates a change from [c]-axis girdles, diagnostic of multiple slip systems, to a single maximum in Y. Within the GBM zone, above 630±30 °C, the textures also include submaxima, which are indicative of combined basal 〈a〉- and prism [c] slip. read more read less

Topics:

Dynamic recrystallization (60%)60% related to the paper, Subgrain rotation recrystallization (57%)57% related to the paper, Mylonite (57%)57% related to the paper, Slip (materials science) (52%)52% related to the paper, Dislocation creep (51%)51% related to the paper
1,151 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0191-8141(92)90053-Y
Dislocation creep regimes in quartz aggregates
Greg Hirth1, Jan Tullis1

Abstract:

Using optical and TEM microscopy we have determined that three regimes of dislocation creep occur in experimentally deformed quartz aggregates, depending on the relative rates of grain boundary migration, dislocation climb and dislocation production. Within each regime a distinctive microstructure is produced due primarily to... Using optical and TEM microscopy we have determined that three regimes of dislocation creep occur in experimentally deformed quartz aggregates, depending on the relative rates of grain boundary migration, dislocation climb and dislocation production. Within each regime a distinctive microstructure is produced due primarily to the operation of different mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization. At lower temperatures and faster strain rates the rate of dislocation production is too great for diffusion-controlled dislocation climb to be an effective recovery mechanism. In this regime recovery is accommodated by strain-induced grain boundary migration recrystallization. With an increase in temperature or decrease in strain rate, the rate of dislocation climb becomes sufficiently rapid to accommodate recovery. In this regime dynamic recrystallization occurs by progressive subgrain rotation. With a further increase in temperature or decrease in strain rate dislocation climb remains sufficiently rapid to accommodate recovery. However, in this regime grain boundary migration is rapid, thus recrystallization occurs by both grain boundary migration and progressive subgrain rotation. The identification of the three regimes of dislocation creep may have important implications for the determination of flow law parameters and the calibration of recrystallized grain size piezometers. In addition, the identification of a particular dislocation creep regime could be useful in helping to constrain the conditions at which a given natural deformation has occurred. read more read less

Topics:

Dislocation creep (68%)68% related to the paper, Recovery (64%)64% related to the paper, Subgrain rotation recrystallization (60%)60% related to the paper, Dynamic recrystallization (60%)60% related to the paper, Recrystallization (geology) (57%)57% related to the paper
1,018 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0191-8141(84)90001-4
S-C Mylonites
Gordon S. Lister1, A.W. Snoke2

Abstract:

Two types of foliations are commonly developed in mylonites and mylonitic rocks: (a) S-surfaces related to the accumulation of finite strain and (b) C-surfaces related to displacement discontinuities or zones of relatively high shear strain. There are two types of S-C mylonites. Type I S-C mylonites, described by Berthe et al... Two types of foliations are commonly developed in mylonites and mylonitic rocks: (a) S-surfaces related to the accumulation of finite strain and (b) C-surfaces related to displacement discontinuities or zones of relatively high shear strain. There are two types of S-C mylonites. Type I S-C mylonites, described by Berthe et al., typically occur in deformed granitoids. They involve narrow zones of intense shear strain which cut across (mylonitic) foliation. Type II S-C mylonites (described here) have widespread occurrence in quartz-mica rocks involved in zones of intense non-coaxial laminar flow. The C-surfaces are defined by trails of mica ‘fish’ formed as the result of microscopic displacement discontinuities or zones of very high shear strain. The S-surfaces are defined by oblique foliations in the adjacent quartz aggregates, formed as the result of dynamic recrystallization which periodically resets the ‘finite-strain clock’. These oblique foliations are characterized by grain elongations, alignments of segments of the grain boundary enveloping surfaces, and by trails of grains with similar c-axis orientations. Examples of this aspect of foliation development in mylonitic rocks are so widespread that we suggest the creation of a broad class of S-C tectonites, and a deviation from the general tradition of purely geometric analysis of foliation and time relationships. Kinematic indicators such as those discussed here allow the recognition of kilometre-scale zones of intense non-coaxial laminar flow in crustal rocks, and unambiguous determination of the sense of shear. read more read less

Topics:

Mica fish (67%)67% related to the paper, Shear (geology) (60%)60% related to the paper, Mylonite (57%)57% related to the paper, Tectonite (54%)54% related to the paper, Foliation (geology) (51%)51% related to the paper
948 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0191-8141(80)90038-3
Shear zone geometry: A review

Abstract:

Shear zones may be classified into brittle, brittle-ductile, and ductile shear zones. The geometry and displacement boundary conditions of these zones are established. The geometric characteristics of ductile shear zones relevant to geological studies are described: orientations and values of principal finite strains, rotatio... Shear zones may be classified into brittle, brittle-ductile, and ductile shear zones. The geometry and displacement boundary conditions of these zones are established. The geometric characteristics of ductile shear zones relevant to geological studies are described: orientations and values of principal finite strains, rotation, and deformation features of pre-existing planar and linear structures. Ductile shear zones show a fabric (schistosity and lineation) related to the finite strain state. The methods for determining strains and displacements from field studies are described. Shear zones commonly occur in conjugate sets, but the two differently oriented sets do not seem to be able to operate synchronously. The angular relationships of conjugate ductile shear zones are different from those of brittle shear zones. The termination of all types of shear zones poses complex compatibility problems, some solutions are suggested. A synthesis of shear zone geometry in regions of crustal contraction and crustal extensions is made, and ideas on how deep level ductile shear zones relate to high level brittle shears and gliding nappes are put forward. read more read less

Topics:

Simple shear (66%)66% related to the paper, Shear zone (59%)59% related to the paper, Critical resolved shear stress (59%)59% related to the paper, Shear (sheet metal) (57%)57% related to the paper, Finite strain theory (50%)50% related to the paper
890 Citations
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Journal of Structural Geology format uses elsarticle-num citation style.

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Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Journal of Structural Geology guidelines and autoformat it.

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Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Journal of Structural Geology citation style.

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One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Journal of Structural Geology's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

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To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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S. No. Citation Style Type
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4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
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SciSpace would allow download of your references in Journal of Structural Geology Endnote style, according to elsevier guidelines.

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