Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format
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Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format
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Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format Example of Journal of the American College of Surgeons format
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open access Open Access
recommended Recommended

Journal of the American College of Surgeons — Template for authors

Publisher: Elsevier
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Surgery #8 of 422 up up by 1 rank
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 760 Published Papers | 6120 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 14/06/2020
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Journal Performance & Insights

Impact Factor

CiteRatio

Determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

4.59

3% from 2018

Impact factor for Journal of the American College of Surgeons from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 4.59
2018 4.45
2017 4.767
2016 4.307
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

8.1

4% from 2019

CiteRatio for Journal of the American College of Surgeons from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 8.1
2019 7.8
2018 8.3
2017 7.7
2016 8.2
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 3% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

2.305

10% from 2019

SJR for Journal of the American College of Surgeons from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.305
2019 2.095
2018 2.455
2017 2.455
2016 2.643
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

2.215

7% from 2019

SNIP for Journal of the American College of Surgeons from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.215
2019 2.062
2018 1.963
2017 1.863
2016 2.167
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 10% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 7% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons

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Elsevier

Journal of the American College of Surgeons

The Journal of the American College of Surgeons (JACS) is a monthly journal publishing peer-reviewed original contributions on all aspects of surgery. These contributions include, but are not limited to, original clinical studies, review articles, and experimental investigatio...... Read More

Surgery

Medicine

i
Last updated on
13 Jun 2020
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ISSN
1072-7515
i
Impact Factor
High - 2.194
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
elsarticle-num
i
Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
i
Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, T. M. Klapwijk, Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25 (7) (1982) 4515–4532. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.JAMCOLLSURG.2010.01.028
Frailty as a Predictor of Surgical Outcomes in Older Patients

Abstract:

Background Preoperative risk assessment is important yet inexact in older patients because physiologic reserves are difficult to measure. Frailty is thought to estimate physiologic reserves, although its use has not been evaluated in surgical patients. We designed a study to determine if frailty predicts surgical complication... Background Preoperative risk assessment is important yet inexact in older patients because physiologic reserves are difficult to measure. Frailty is thought to estimate physiologic reserves, although its use has not been evaluated in surgical patients. We designed a study to determine if frailty predicts surgical complications and enhances current perioperative risk models. Study Design We prospectively measured frailty in 594 patients (age 65 years or older) presenting to a university hospital for elective surgery between July 2005 and July 2006. Frailty was classified using a validated scale (0 to 5) that included weakness, weight loss, exhaustion, low physical activity, and slowed walking speed. Patients scoring 4 to 5 were classified as frail, 2 to 3 were intermediately frail, and 0 to 1 were nonfrail. Main outcomes measures were 30-day surgical complications, length of stay, and discharge disposition. Multiple logistic regression (complications and discharge) and negative binomial regression (length of stay) were done to analyze frailty and postoperative outcomes associations. Results Preoperative frailty was associated with an increased risk for postoperative complications (intermediately frail: odds ratio [OR] 2.06; 95% CI 1.18–3.60; frail: OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.12–5.77), length of stay (intermediately frail: incidence rate ratio 1.49; 95% CI 1.24–1.80; frail: incidence rate ratio 1.69; 95% CI 1.28–2.23), and discharge to a skilled or assisted-living facility after previously living at home (intermediately frail: OR 3.16; 95% CI 1.0–9.99; frail: OR 20.48; 95% CI 5.54–75.68). Frailty improved predictive power (p Conclusions Frailty independently predicts postoperative complications, length of stay, and discharge to a skilled or assisted-living facility in older surgical patients and enhances conventional risk models. Assessing frailty using a standardized definition can help patients and physicians make more informed decisions. read more read less

Topics:

Odds ratio (51%)51% related to the paper, Rate ratio (50%)50% related to the paper
1,600 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article
Efficacy of MRI and mammography for breast-cancer screening in women with familial or genetic predisposition

Abstract:

Question: In women with a familial or genetic predisposition for breast cancer is screening with MRI more effective than mammography or usual care? Design: Prospective cohort study Setting: Six familial cancer centers in the Netherlands Patients: One thousand and nine women aged 25 to 75 years with a cumulative lifetime risk ... Question: In women with a familial or genetic predisposition for breast cancer is screening with MRI more effective than mammography or usual care? Design: Prospective cohort study Setting: Six familial cancer centers in the Netherlands Patients: One thousand and nine women aged 25 to 75 years with a cumulative lifetime risk of breast cancer of 15% or more owing to a familial or genetic predisposition based on a modified Clasus model were included. Description of Test and Diagnostic Standard: Two view mammography (oblique and craniocaudal views and if necessary, compression views or magnification) and dynamic breast MRI with gadolinium containing contrast medium using a standard protocol were performed yearly. Clinical breast examination was performed every 6 months. When possible, both imaging investigations were performed on the same day or same time period between day 5 & day 15 of the menstrual cycle. The results of both investigations, which were blinded were scored in a standardized way, according the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (BI-RADS) Classification. Main Outcomes Measure: Sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination, mammography and MRI. Main Results: The sensitivity of clinical breast examination, mammography and MRI for detecting invasive breast cancer was 17.9%, 33.3% and 79.5% respectively and the specificity was 98.1%, 95.0% and 89.8% respectively. Conclusion: MRI appears to be more sensitive than mammography in detecting tumors in females with a genetic or familial predisposition to breast cancer Commentary: Although Kriege et al, 1 address two questions in this study, the focus of this review is the comparison of mammography to MRI in detecting breast cancers in women with a familial or genetic predisposition to breast cancer. read more read less

Topics:

Breast MRI (76%)76% related to the paper, Breast cancer screening (67%)67% related to the paper, Mammography (66%)66% related to the paper, Breast cancer (65%)65% related to the paper, Breast imaging (63%)63% related to the paper
1,469 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article
An analysis of the problem of biliary injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy
Steven M. Strasberg1, Hertl M, Nathaniel J. Soper

Topics:

Biliary injury (79%)79% related to the paper, Cholecystectomy (65%)65% related to the paper
1,337 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.JAMCOLLSURG.2013.07.385
Development and Evaluation of the Universal ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator: A Decision Aid and Informed Consent Tool for Patients and Surgeons

Abstract:

Background Accurately estimating surgical risks is critical for shared decision making and informed consent. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services may soon put forth a measure requiring surgeons to provide patients with patient-specific, empirically derived estimates of postoperative complications. Our objectives wer... Background Accurately estimating surgical risks is critical for shared decision making and informed consent. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services may soon put forth a measure requiring surgeons to provide patients with patient-specific, empirically derived estimates of postoperative complications. Our objectives were to develop a universal surgical risk estimation tool, to compare performance of the universal vs previous procedure-specific surgical risk calculators, and to allow surgeons to empirically adjust the estimates of risk. Study Design Using standardized clinical data from 393 ACS NSQIP hospitals, a web-based tool was developed to allow surgeons to easily enter 21 preoperative factors (demographics, comorbidities, procedure). Regression models were developed to predict 8 outcomes based on the preoperative risk factors. The universal model was compared with procedure-specific models. To incorporate surgeon input, a subjective surgeon adjustment score, allowing risk estimates to vary within the estimate's confidence interval, was introduced and tested with 80 surgeons using 10 case scenarios. Results Based on 1,414,006 patients encompassing 1,557 unique CPT codes, a universal surgical risk calculator model was developed that had excellent performance for mortality (c-statistic = 0.944; Brier score = 0.011 [where scores approaching 0 are better]), morbidity (c-statistic = 0.816, Brier score = 0.069), and 6 additional complications (c-statistics > 0.8). Predictions were similarly robust for the universal calculator vs procedure-specific calculators (eg, colorectal). Surgeons demonstrated considerable agreement on the case scenario scoring (80% to 100% agreement), suggesting reliable score assignment between surgeons. Conclusions The ACS NSQIP surgical risk calculator is a decision-support tool based on reliable multi-institutional clinical data, which can be used to estimate the risks of most operations. The ACS NSQIP surgical risk calculator will allow clinicians and patients to make decisions using empirically derived, patient-specific postoperative risks. read more read less

Topics:

Risk assessment (51%)51% related to the paper
1,327 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.JAMCOLLSURG.2009.09.031
Toward Robust Information: Data Quality and Inter-Rater Reliability in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

Abstract:

Background Data used for evaluating quality of medical care need to be of high reliability to ensure valid quality assessment and benchmarking. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) has continually emphasized the collection of highly reliable clinical data through its progr... Background Data used for evaluating quality of medical care need to be of high reliability to ensure valid quality assessment and benchmarking. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) has continually emphasized the collection of highly reliable clinical data through its program infrastructure. Study Design We provide a detailed description of the various mechanisms used in ACS NSQIP to assure collection of high quality data, including training of data collectors (surgical clinical reviewers) and ongoing audits of data reliability. For the 2005 through 2008 calendar years, inter-rater reliability was calculated overall and for individual variables using percentages of agreement between the data collector and the auditor. Variables with > 5% disagreement are flagged for educational efforts to improve accurate collection. Cohen's kappa was estimated for selected variables from the 2007 audit year. Results Inter-rater reliability audits show that overall disagreement rates on variables have fallen from 3.15% in 2005 (the first year of public enrollment in ACS NSQIP) to 1.56% in 2008. In addition, disagreement levels for individual variables have continually improved, with 26 individual variables demonstrating > 5% disagreement in 2005, to only 2 such variables in 2008. Estimated kappa values suggest substantial or almost perfect agreement for most variables. Conclusions The ACS NSQIP has implemented training and audit procedures for its hospital participants that are highly effective in collecting robust data. Audit results show that data have been reliable since the program's inception and that reliability has improved every year. read more read less

Topics:

Data quality (56%)56% related to the paper, Audit (53%)53% related to the paper, Quality assurance (50%)50% related to the paper, Reliability (statistics) (50%)50% related to the paper, Inter-rater reliability (50%)50% related to the paper
1,136 Citations
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12. Is Journal of the American College of Surgeons's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Journal of the American College of Surgeons?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Journal of the American College of Surgeons. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Journal of the American College of Surgeons?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Journal of the American College of Surgeons are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

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Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Journal of the American College of Surgeons Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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