Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format
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Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format
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Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format Example of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 913057 e-ISSN: 18735177

Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior — Template for authors

Publisher: Elsevier
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Behavioral Neuroscience #27 of 78 down down by 21 ranks
Pharmacology #123 of 297 down down by 61 ranks
Toxicology #52 of 122 down down by 36 ranks
Biochemistry #192 of 415 down down by 101 ranks
Clinical Biochemistry #53 of 113 down down by 32 ranks
Biological Psychiatry #24 of 38 down down by 9 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 506 Published Papers | 2388 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 18/06/2020
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

2.519

9% from 2018

Impact factor for Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 2.519
2018 2.773
2017 2.538
2016 2.748
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 9% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

4.7

7% from 2019

CiteRatio for Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 4.7
2019 4.4
2018 5.3
2017 6.4
2016 5.7
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 7% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

1.184

45% from 2019

SJR for Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.184
2019 0.814
2018 0.924
2017 1.15
2016 1.206
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 45% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.912

20% from 2019

SNIP for Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.912
2019 0.763
2018 0.816
2017 0.918
2016 0.845
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 20% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 21922195 e-ISSN: 21922209

Springer

CiteRatio: 4.3 | SJR: 0.633 | SNIP: 1.433
open access Open Access ISSN: 0039128X e-ISSN: 18785867

Elsevier

CiteRatio: 3.7 | SJR: 0.469 | SNIP: 0.907
open access Open Access ISSN: 14316730 e-ISSN: 14374315

De Gruyter

CiteRatio: 6.5 | SJR: 1.246 | SNIP: 0.854
open access Open Access ISSN: 16625161

Frontiers Media

CiteRatio: 5.1 | SJR: 1.128 | SNIP: 1.221

Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior

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Elsevier

Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior

Pharmacology Biochemistry & Behavior publishes original reports in the areas of pharmacology and biochemistry in which the primary emphasis and theoretical context are behavioral. Contributions may involve clinical, preclinical, or basic research. Purely behavioral, biochemica...... Read More

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Last updated on
18 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0091-3057
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Impact Factor
High - 2.748
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Acceptance Rate
Not provided
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Frequency
Not provided
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Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
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Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, T. M. Klapwijk, Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25 (7) (1982) 4515–4532. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/S0091-3057(01)00746-8
Molecular, pharmacological and functional diversity of 5-HT receptors
Daniel Hoyer1, Jason P. Hannon1, Graeme R. Martin1

Abstract:

Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is probably unique among the monoamines in that its effects are subserved by as many as 13 distinct heptahelical, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and one (presumably a family of) ligand-gated ion channel(s). These receptors are divided into seven distinct classes (5-HT(1) to 5-HT(7)) ... Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is probably unique among the monoamines in that its effects are subserved by as many as 13 distinct heptahelical, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and one (presumably a family of) ligand-gated ion channel(s). These receptors are divided into seven distinct classes (5-HT(1) to 5-HT(7)) largely on the basis of their structural and operational characteristics. Whilst this degree of physical diversity clearly underscores the physiological importance of serotonin, evidence for an even greater degree of operational diversity continues to emerge. The challenge for modern 5-HT research has therefore been to define more precisely the properties of the systems that make this incredible diversity possible. Much progress in this regard has been made during the last decade with the realisation that serotonin is possibly the least conservative monoamine transmitter and the cloning of its many receptors. Coupled with the actions of an extremely avid and efficient reuptake system, this array of receptor subtypes provides almost limitless signalling capabilities to the extent that one might even question the need for other transmitter systems. However, the complexity of the system appears endless, since posttranslational modifications, such as alternate splicing and RNA editing, increase the number of proteins, oligomerisation and heteromerisation increase the number of complexes, and multiple G-protein suggest receptor trafficking, allowing phenotypic switching and crosstalk within and possibly between receptor families. Whether all these possibilities are used in vivo under physiological or pathological conditions remains to be firmly established, but in essence, such variety will keep the 5-HT community busy for quite some time. Those who may have predicted that molecular biology would largely simplify the life of pharmacologists have missed the point for 5-HT research in particular and, most probably, for many other transmitters. This chapter is an attempt to summarise very briefly 5-HT receptor diversity. The reward for unravelling this complex array of serotonin receptor--effector systems may be substantial, the ultimate prize being the development of important new drugs in a range of disease areas. read more read less
1,755 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0091-3057(86)90552-6
Anxiolytic and anxiogenic drug effects on exploratory activity in an elevated plus-maze: a novel test of anxiety in the rat
Sharon Pellow1, Sandra E. File1

Abstract:

The current studies further investigated the effects, in animal models of anxiety, of novel putative anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds believed to induce their effects by actions at the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex. It was expected that the results would also provide further validation for a novel test of anxiety ba... The current studies further investigated the effects, in animal models of anxiety, of novel putative anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds believed to induce their effects by actions at the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex. It was expected that the results would also provide further validation for a novel test of anxiety based on the ratio of open to closed arm entries in an elevated plus maze in the rat. The novel putative anxiolytics CL 218,872 (10–20 mg/kg) and tracazolate (5 mg/kg) significantly elevated the percentage of time spent on the open arms of an elevated plus-maze, consistent with their anxiolytic activity in several other animal tests. Also consistent with results from other animal tests, no anxiolytic activity was observed for the phenylquinoline PK 8165 (10–25 mg/kg), the 3,4-benzodiazepine tofisopam (25–50 mg/kg), or buspirone (0.5–20 mg/kg). The benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonists FG 7142 (1–5 mg/kg) and CGS 8216 (3–10 mg/kg) had anxiogenic activity in this test, as did the atypical benzodiazepine Ro 5-4864 (1–5 mg/kg). Interestingly, however, the benzodiazepine receptor antagonists Ro 15-1788 (10–20 mg/kg) and ZK 93426 (5–10 mg/kg) had no anxiogenic activity in this test. read more read less

Topics:

Elevated plus maze (63%)63% related to the paper, Anxiogenic (62%)62% related to the paper, Anxiolytic (61%)61% related to the paper, ZK-93426 (58%)58% related to the paper, CGS-8216 (57%)57% related to the paper
1,400 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0091-3057(80)90067-2
Preliminary report of a simple animal behavior model for the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines

Abstract:

A simple system is described to analyze the possibility that increased exploratory behavior is an index for the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines in laboratory rodents. Mice were allowed free run in a two-chambered arena, where two-thirds of the area was illuminated and one-third was darkened. The two chambers were separa... A simple system is described to analyze the possibility that increased exploratory behavior is an index for the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines in laboratory rodents. Mice were allowed free run in a two-chambered arena, where two-thirds of the area was illuminated and one-third was darkened. The two chambers were separated by a black partition equipped with photocells across the opening, and the entire cage rested on an Animex activity monitor. Transitions across the partition between the light and dark chambers, and total Animex locomotor activity, were increased by clonazepam and chlordiazepoxide, in dose-dependent ranges consistent with previously reported behavior models. The increased exploratory activity with benzodiazepines does not appear to be a non-specific increase in general motor activity, as locomotion in clonazepam and chlordiazepoxide treated mice placed in a bare, undifferentiated cage was not significantly different from vehicle treated mice. read more read less

Topics:

Chlordiazepoxide (51%)51% related to the paper
1,205 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0091-3057(95)02126-4
A review of the validity and variability of the elevated plus-maze as an animal model of anxiety.
Sandy Hogg1

Abstract:

Despite or possibly by virtue of the fact that it is one of the most commonly used animal models of anxiety the Elevated Plus-Maze (EPM) results in a wide range of, often contradictory, results following pharmacological experiments. The responses from a questionnaire distributed to 65 groups that have published studies using ... Despite or possibly by virtue of the fact that it is one of the most commonly used animal models of anxiety the Elevated Plus-Maze (EPM) results in a wide range of, often contradictory, results following pharmacological experiments. The responses from a questionnaire distributed to 65 groups that have published studies using the EPM in the past 3 years has, along with reference to published reports, enabled some conclusions regarding the influencing factors to be drawn. Some evidence for differential sensitivities between strains exists, with albino rats being more sensitive to the anxiolytic effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and 5-HT1A receptor agonists than pigmented animals. Most important, however, is the manipulation of the animals prior to testing and the aversiveness of the test conditions themselves. Stressing animals before testing (e.g., by moving from holding to test room) or using more aversive test conditions (e.g., elevated light levels) increases sensitivity to potential anxiolytics. Animals that are habituated to gentle handling or tested in less aversive conditions (e.g., EPM with ledges) show reduced likelihood of anxiolytic responses with administration of 5-HT3 antagonists, 5-HT1A agonists, and benzodiazepines. read more read less

Topics:

Elevated plus maze (62%)62% related to the paper, Anxiolytic (54%)54% related to the paper
1,076 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.PBB.2006.12.001
Adolescent cortical development : A critical period of vulnerability for addiction
Fulton T. Crews1, Jun He1, Clyde W. Hodge1

Abstract:

Cortical growth and remodeling continues from birth through youth and adolescence to stable adult levels changing slowly into senescence. There are critical periods of cortical development when specific experiences drive major synaptic rearrangements and learning that only occur during the critical period. For example, visual... Cortical growth and remodeling continues from birth through youth and adolescence to stable adult levels changing slowly into senescence. There are critical periods of cortical development when specific experiences drive major synaptic rearrangements and learning that only occur during the critical period. For example, visual cortex is characterized by a critical period of plasticity involved in establishing visual acuity. Adolescence is defined by characteristic behaviors that include high levels of risk taking, exploration, novelty and sensation seeking, social interaction and play behaviors. In addition, adolescence is the final period of development of the adult during which talents, reasoning and complex adult behaviors mature. This maturation of behaviors corresponds with periods of marked changes in neurogenesis, cortical synaptic remodeling, neurotransmitter receptors and transporters, as well as major changes in hormones. Frontal cortical development is later in adolescence and likely contributes to refinement of reasoning, goal and priority setting, impulse control and evaluating long and short term rewards. Adolescent humans have high levels of binge drinking and experimentation with other drugs. This review presents findings supporting adolescence as a critical period of cortical development important for establishing life long adult characteristics that are disrupted by alcohol and drug use. read more read less
889 Citations
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Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior citation style.

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Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

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After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
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  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior Endnote style, according to elsevier guidelines.

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