Example of Metallomics format
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Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format
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Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format Example of Metallomics format
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This content is only for preview purposes. The original open access content can be found here.
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Metallomics — Template for authors

Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Medicine (all) #59 of 793 down down by None rank
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 678 Published Papers | 4190 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 04/07/2020
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Related Journals

open access Open Access

Taylor and Francis

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 2.8
SJR: 0.806
SNIP: 1.28
open access Open Access

Springer

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 3.1
SJR: 0.859
SNIP: 1.433
open access Open Access

SAGE

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 4.5
SJR: 0.914
SNIP: 1.191
open access Open Access
recommended Recommended

SAGE

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 8.6
SJR: 1.669
SNIP: 1.889

Journal Performance & Insights

Impact Factor

CiteRatio

Determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.796

6% from 2018

Impact factor for Metallomics from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 3.796
2018 3.571
2017 4.069
2016 3.975
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

6.2

19% from 2019

CiteRatio for Metallomics from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 6.2
2019 5.2
2018 6.5
2017 7.8
2016 7.2
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 6% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 19% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.012

0% from 2019

SJR for Metallomics from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.012
2019 1.014
2018 1.16
2017 0.954
2016 1.151
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

1.204

11% from 2019

SNIP for Metallomics from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.204
2019 1.081
2018 1.032
2017 1.088
2016 1.077
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 0% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 11% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Metallomics

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Royal Society of Chemistry

Metallomics

Approved by publishing and review experts on SciSpace, this template is built as per for Metallomics formatting guidelines as mentioned in Royal Society of Chemistry author instructions. The current version was created on 03 Jul 2020 and has been used by 594 authors to write and format their manuscripts to this journal.

Chemistry

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Last updated on
03 Jul 2020
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ISSN
1756-5901
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
numbers
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Citation Type
Numbered (Superscripted)
25
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Bibliography Example
C. W. J. Beenakker, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 97, 067007.

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00185G
Selenium biochemistry and its role for human health
Marco Roman, Petru Jitaru1, Carlo Barbante
01 Jan 2014 - Metallomics

Abstract:

Despite its very low level in humans, selenium plays an important and unique role among the (semi)metal trace essential elements because it is the only one for which incorporation into proteins is genetically encoded, as the constitutive part of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Twenty-five selenoproteins have been identif... Despite its very low level in humans, selenium plays an important and unique role among the (semi)metal trace essential elements because it is the only one for which incorporation into proteins is genetically encoded, as the constitutive part of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Twenty-five selenoproteins have been identified so far in the human proteome. The biological functions of some of them are still unknown, whereas for others there is evidence for a role in antioxidant defence, redox state regulation and a wide variety of specific metabolic pathways. In relation to these functions, the selenoproteins emerged in recent years as possible biomarkers of several diseases such as diabetes and several forms of cancer. Comprehension of the selenium biochemical pathways under normal physiological conditions is therefore an important requisite to elucidate its preventing/therapeutic effect for human diseases. This review summarizes the most recent findings on the biochemistry of active selenium species in humans, and addresses the latest evidence on the link between selenium intake, selenoproteins functionality and beneficial health effects. Primary emphasis is given to the interpretation of biochemical mechanisms rather than epidemiological/observational data. In this context, the review includes the following sections: (1) brief introduction; (2) general nutritional aspects of selenium; (3) global view of selenium metabolic routes; (4) detailed characterization of all human selenoproteins; (5) detailed discussion of the relation between selenoproteins and a variety of human diseases. read more read less
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544 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/B904071D
Recent developments in ruthenium anticancer drugs.
Aviva Levina1, Anannya Mitra1, Peter A. Lay1
01 Nov 2009 - Metallomics

Abstract:

Interest in Ru anticancer drugs has been growing rapidly since NAMI-A ((ImH+)[RuIIICl4(Im)(S-dmso)], where Im = imidazole and S-dmso = S-bound dimethylsulfoxide) or KP1019 ((IndH+)[RuIIICl4(Ind)2], where Ind = indazole) have successfully completed phase I clinical trials and an array of other Ru complexes have shown promise f... Interest in Ru anticancer drugs has been growing rapidly since NAMI-A ((ImH+)[RuIIICl4(Im)(S-dmso)], where Im = imidazole and S-dmso = S-bound dimethylsulfoxide) or KP1019 ((IndH+)[RuIIICl4(Ind)2], where Ind = indazole) have successfully completed phase I clinical trials and an array of other Ru complexes have shown promise for future development. Herein, the recent literature is reviewed critically to ascertain likely mechanisms of action of Ru-based anticancer drugs, with the emphasis on their reactions with biological media. The most likely interactions of Ru complexes are with: (i) albumin and transferrin in blood plasma, the former serving as a Ru depot, and the latter possibly providing active transport of Ru into cells; (ii) collagens of the extracellular matrix and actins on the cell surface, which are likely to be involved in the specific anti-metastatic action of Ru complexes; (iii) regulatory enzymes within the cell membrane and/or in the cytoplasm; and (iv) DNA in the cell nucleus. Some types of Ru complexes can also promote the intracellular formation of free radical species, either through irradiation (photodynamic therapy), or through reactions with cellular reductants. The metabolic pathways involve competition among reduction, aquation, and hydrolysis in the extracellular medium; binding to transport proteins, the extracellular matrix, and cell-surface biomolecules; and diffusion into cells; with the extent to which individual drugs participate in various steps along these pathways being crucial factors in determining whether they are mainly anti-metastatic or cytotoxic. This diversity of modes of action of Ru anticancer drugs is also likely to enhance their anticancer activities and to reduce the potential for them to develop tumour resistance. New approaches to metabolic studies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence microscopy, are required to provide further mechanistic insights, which could lead to the rational design of improved Ru anticancer drugs. read more read less

Topics:

NAMI-A (54%)54% related to the paper
517 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/C5MT00149H
Targeting copper in cancer therapy: ‘Copper That Cancer’
04 Nov 2015 - Metallomics

Abstract:

Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in fundamental life processes that are conserved throughout all forms of life. The ability of copper to catalyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, which can inadvertently lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitates the tight homeostatic regulation of... Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in fundamental life processes that are conserved throughout all forms of life. The ability of copper to catalyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, which can inadvertently lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitates the tight homeostatic regulation of copper within the body. Many cancer types exhibit increased intratumoral copper and/or altered systemic copper distribution. The realization that copper serves as a limiting factor for multiple aspects of tumor progression, including growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, has prompted the development of copper-specific chelators as therapies to inhibit these processes. Another therapeutic approach utilizes specific ionophores that deliver copper to cells to increase intracellular copper levels. The therapeutic window between normal and cancerous cells when intracellular copper is forcibly increased, is the premise for the development of copper-ionophores endowed with anticancer properties. Also under investigation is the use of copper to replace platinum in coordination complexes currently used as mainstream chemotherapies. In comparison to platinum-based drugs, these promising copper coordination complexes may be more potent anticancer agents, with reduced toxicity toward normal cells and they may potentially circumvent the chemoresistance associated with recurrent platinum treatment. In addition, cancerous cells can adapt their copper homeostatic mechanisms to acquire resistance to conventional platinum-based drugs and certain copper coordination complexes can re-sensitize cancer cells to these drugs. This review will outline the biological importance of copper and copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, followed by a discussion of our current understanding of copper dysregulation in cancer, and the recent therapeutic advances using copper coordination complexes as anticancer agents. read more read less

Topics:

Copper (53%)53% related to the paper
496 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/B907567D
Inhibition of transcription by platinum antitumor compounds
Ryan C. Todd1, Stephen J. Lippard1
07 Jul 2009 - Metallomics

Abstract:

Cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin are three FDA-approved members of the platinum anticancer drug family. These compounds induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming a variety of structural adducts and triggering cellular responses, one of which is the inhibition of transcription. In this report we... Cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin are three FDA-approved members of the platinum anticancer drug family. These compounds induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming a variety of structural adducts and triggering cellular responses, one of which is the inhibition of transcription. In this report we present (i) a detailed review of the structural investigations of various Pt–DNA adducts and the effects of these lesions on global DNA geometry; (ii) research detailing inhibition of cellular transcription by Pt–DNA adducts; and (iii) a mechanistic analysis of how DNA structural distortions induced by platinum damage may inhibit RNA synthesis in vivo. A thorough understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of platinum antitumor agents will aid in the development of new compounds in the family. read more read less

Topics:

Cisplatin (54%)54% related to the paper, Transcription (biology) (50%)50% related to the paper, DNA (50%)50% related to the paper, Carboplatin (50%)50% related to the paper
489 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00347G
Serum ferritin is an important inflammatory disease marker, as it is mainly a leakage product from damaged cells
Douglas B. Kell1, Etheresia Pretorius2
27 Mar 2014 - Metallomics

Abstract:

'Serum ferritin' presents a paradox, as the iron storage protein ferritin is not synthesised in serum yet is to be found there. Serum ferritin is also a well known inflammatory marker, but it is unclear whether serum ferritin reflects or causes inflammation, or whether it is involved in an inflammatory cycle. We argue here th... 'Serum ferritin' presents a paradox, as the iron storage protein ferritin is not synthesised in serum yet is to be found there. Serum ferritin is also a well known inflammatory marker, but it is unclear whether serum ferritin reflects or causes inflammation, or whether it is involved in an inflammatory cycle. We argue here that serum ferritin arises from damaged cells, and is thus a marker of cellular damage. The protein in serum ferritin is considered benign, but it has lost (i.e. dumped) most of its normal complement of iron which when unliganded is highly toxic. The facts that serum ferritin levels can correlate with both disease and with body iron stores are thus expected on simple chemical kinetic grounds. Serum ferritin levels also correlate with other phenotypic readouts such as erythrocyte morphology. Overall, this systems approach serves to explain a number of apparent paradoxes of serum ferritin, including (i) why it correlates with biomarkers of cell damage, (ii) why it correlates with biomarkers of hydroxyl radical formation (and oxidative stress) and (iii) therefore why it correlates with the presence and/or severity of numerous diseases. This leads to suggestions for how one might exploit the corollaries of the recognition that serum ferritin levels mainly represent a consequence of cell stress and damage. read more read less

Topics:

Ferritin (73%)73% related to the paper
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446 Citations
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Metallomics format uses numbers citation style.

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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write Metallomics in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Metallomics guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Metallomics guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Metallomics guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Metallomics?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Metallomics citation style.

4. Can I use the Metallomics templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Metallomics.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Metallomics that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Metallomics that you can download at the end.

6. How long does it usually take you to format my papers in Metallomics?

It only takes a matter of seconds to edit your manuscript. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves you from writing and formatting it in Metallomics.

7. Where can I find the template for the Metallomics?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Metallomics's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

8. Can I reformat my paper to fit the Metallomics's guidelines?

Of course! You can do this using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, our support team is always ready to assist you.

9. Metallomics an online tool or is there a desktop version?

SciSpace's Metallomics is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

10. I cannot find my template in your gallery. Can you create it for me like Metallomics?

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it setup within a few days. You can find the request box in Journal Gallery on the right side bar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for like Metallomics?”

11. What is the output that I would get after using Metallomics?

After writing your paper autoformatting in Metallomics, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Metallomics's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Metallomics?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Metallomics. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Metallomics?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Metallomics are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Metallomics?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Metallomics's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

16. Can I download Metallomics in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Metallomics Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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