Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format
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Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format
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Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format Example of Journal for the History of Astronomy format
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open access Open Access

Journal for the History of Astronomy — Template for authors

Publisher: SAGE
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous) #228 of 306 down down by 10 ranks
Astronomy and Astrophysics #74 of 88 down down by 8 ranks
Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous) #50 of 58 down down by 10 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Medium
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 76 Published Papers | 40 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 19/07/2020
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Journal Performance & Insights

CiteRatio

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.5

17% from 2019

CiteRatio for Journal for the History of Astronomy from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.5
2019 0.6
2018 0.7
2017 0.5
2016 0.6
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

0.103

36% from 2019

SJR for Journal for the History of Astronomy from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.103
2019 0.162
2018 0.202
2017 0.233
2016 0.149
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

1.039

14% from 2019

SNIP for Journal for the History of Astronomy from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.039
2019 0.915
2018 0.764
2017 0.492
2016 1.172
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has decreased by 17% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 36% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 14% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Journal for the History of Astronomy

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SAGE

Journal for the History of Astronomy

Papers offered for publication should in the first instance be submitted in Word for Windows format, as an e-mail attachment to Michael Hoskin at ... Read More

Physics and Astronomy

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Last updated on
19 Jul 2020
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ISSN
0021-8286
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Impact Factor
High - 1.099
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Open Access
No
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
SageV
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Citation Type
Numbered (Superscripted)
25
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Bibliography Example
Blonder GE, Tinkham M and Klapwijk TM. Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys. Rev. B 1982; 25(7): 4515–4532. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515.

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1177/002182868001100102
A Probable Flamsteed Observation of the Cassiopeia A Supernova
William B. Ashworth1

Topics:

Cassiopeia A (78%)78% related to the paper, Supernova (51%)51% related to the paper
115 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1177/002182867000100203
The Mathematical Principles Underlying Newton's Principia Mathematica:
D. T. Whiteside1

Abstract:

On 18 July 1733, half a dozen years after Isaac Newton's death, Dr William Derham (a close friend during his last years) observed that \"S' Is[aac] ... abhorred all Contests.... And for this reason, mainly to avoid being baited by little Smatterers in Mathematicks, he told me, he designedly made his Principia abstruse; but ye... On 18 July 1733, half a dozen years after Isaac Newton's death, Dr William Derham (a close friend during his last years) observed that \"S' Is[aac] ... abhorred all Contests.... And for this reason, mainly to avoid being baited by little Smatterers in Mathematicks, he told me, he designedly made his Principia abstruse; but yet so as to be understood by able Mathematicians, who he imagined, by comprehending his Demonstrations, would concurr with him in his Theory\".\" Forty years before, as Newton passed unseeingly by in the street at Cambridge, a nameless undergraduate had remarked sotto voce: \"There goes the man that writt a book that neither he nor anybody else understands\".\" Evidently, if it had been Newton's intention in the 1680s to make his mathematical world-view impossibly difficult for all but a tightly restricted elite to comprehend, in this one case at least he succeeded only too well. But was it? When we go behind such hearsay and anecdote, we will find that there is no trustworthy documentary evidence that Newton did deliberately contrive to render his Mathematical principles of natural philosophy more esoteric and impenetrable than he need have done. No one would deny that this ikon of scientific history is far from easy to read. Quite bluntly, the logical structure of Newton's book is slipshod, its level of verbal fluency none too high, its arguments unnecessarily diffuse and repetitive, and its very content on occasion markedly irrelevant to its professed theme: the theory of bodies in motion. But these faults are far from intentional and can largely be excused by the very rapidity with which the Principia was written-in little more than two years from the autumn of 16844and its author's distinct lack of talent for writing in a popular way. Ofsuch weaknesses no one was more conscious than Newton himself: indeed, we now know that in the early 1690s, soon after his book appeared, he reluctantly contemplated a grand revision of his work which he never found time and energy to irnplement.! In default we must suffer the crudities of the text as we have it in order to master the Principia's complex mathematical and scientific content. To attain this understanding there is no royal road which can bypass its conceptual difficulties, no novice's path which will soften its mathematical rigours. Newton himself tried to lighten the heavy load of preparatory learning for such acquaintances as Trinity College's guiding genius, Richard Bentley, who sought to achieve a limited understanding of merely the basic propositions of the Principia, but he succeeded none too well in his altruistic purpose. Having given Bentley the eminently sensible advice that \"At') first perusal of my Book it's enough if you understand y. Propositions WI\" some of') Demonvtrations we\" are easier than the rest ... [then] pass on to v: 3 Book & when you 'lee the design of that you may turn back to such Propositions as you shall have a desire to know\", Newton was then ineluctably led to compile for him in 1691 a formidable mathematical reading list\" which of necessity referred much more to recent works in geometrical and infinitesimal analysis than to traditional algebra and classical geometry. The Principia was- read more read less
71 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1177/002182869102200103
A National Observatory Transformed - Greenwich in the Nineteenth Century
Robert W. Smith1

Abstract:

The Royal Observatory at Greenwich was one of the leading institutions of nineteenth-century astronomy. It was certainly a national observatory, but for much of that period the high regard with which astronomers viewed the results it produced and its position at the heart of a network of international observatories were such ... The Royal Observatory at Greenwich was one of the leading institutions of nineteenth-century astronomy. It was certainly a national observatory, but for much of that period the high regard with which astronomers viewed the results it produced and its position at the heart of a network of international observatories were such that Greenwich's importance transcended national boundaries. When in 1884 an international conference was held to choose a common zero of longitude, it was the Greenwich meridian that the conferees selected} In some ways, it was the international observatory. Dominating the Royal Observatory's history for almost half of the nineteenth century was Sir George Biddell Airy, Astronomer Royal from 1835 to 1881 (Figure I). Under Airy, the Observatory's complement and types of instruments, as well as methods of management, were transformed from those characteristic of a pre-industrial society to those of a society that had undergone the second phase of the Industrial Revolution. The result was that, although the Observatory was certainly notable for its scientific results, it was perhaps even more important for the new ways ofpursuing astronomy fashioned there. I shall follow E. W. Maunder and argue that under Airy, Greenwich to a large degree resembled a kind of accountant's office, a very different sort of workplace from that common for astronomical institutions in, say, the 1820s when Airy began his career. The Observatory's astronomical goals, however, display a strong strand of continuity throughout the century. Airy nevertheless played a key role in leading the Observatory in new directions and scholars agree that he put his stamp on the institution to a much greater degree than the other nineteenthcentury directors, Nevil Maskelyne, John Pond, and Sir William Christie. In discussing the Royal Observatory in the nineteenth century, I shall therefore concentrate upon Airy's directorship. In a short paper it is impossible to do justice to the full range of endeavours pursued under Airy. I shall instead focus on two areas that I believe are particularly revealing of the Observatory's place in nineteenth-century astronomy and in science in general. Both areas have attracted attention recently: first, the changing responsibilities of the Observatory, which in turn reveal the Observatory's shifting position in the political economies of astronomy and British science, and, second, the extent to which Airy altered the astronomer's workplace and turned Greenwich into a kind offactory and the degree to which Airy was himself a sort of factory manager. The history of nineteenth-century astronomy is a relatively neglected area of read more read less

Topics:

Greenwich (65%)65% related to the paper, Observatory (56%)56% related to the paper
59 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1177/002182860403500305
Historical Values of the Earth's Clock Error Δ and the Calculation of Eclipses:
L. V. Morrison1, F. R. Stephenson2

Abstract:

Numerous observations of the Moon, Sun and planets are recorded in ancient and medieval history. These observations which include many eclipses and lunar and planetary conjunctions frequently attract the interest of historians of astronomy. If the positions of the Moon and Sun (and to a lesser extent the planets) in the histo... Numerous observations of the Moon, Sun and planets are recorded in ancient and medieval history. These observations which include many eclipses and lunar and planetary conjunctions frequently attract the interest of historians of astronomy. If the positions of the Moon and Sun (and to a lesser extent the planets) in the historical past are to be computed with high precision, it is usually necessary to make satisfactory allowance for the effect of variations in the Earth's rate of rotation, or, equivalently, the length of the day (LOD). Long-term variations in the LOD are mainly produced by lunar and solar tides, but other causes such as the continuing rise of land that was glaciated during the last ice-age are also significant. Although actual changes in the LOD amount to only a few hundredths of a second over several thousand years, the cumulative effect (known as ~T) of these minute changes can be very large. For instance, the estimated value of ~T at the epoch 1000 B.C. is as much as 7 hours. During this interval, the Moon can change position by nearly 4°. It is therefore a matter of concern that at present there appears to be a degree of confusion and misapprehension among historians of astronomy over the choice of values of ~T that should be used in making retrospective computations of lunar and solar positions. Accurate knowledge of the value of ~T is often crucial in assessing the local circumstances of solar eclipses. Neglect of variations in the Earth's spin rate would materially affect the calculated positions of where these phenomena could be seen on the Earth's surface. In this paper we shall try to elucidate the necessary procedures and in particular draw attention to several important points regarding ~T in the calculation of solar eclipses. We shall place special emphasis on three specific issues: the adopted time-scale, the importance of tidal friction in the ephemeris of the Moon, and the enumeration of ~T at various epochs in the past. read more read less

Topics:

Eclipse (61%)61% related to the paper
56 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1177/002182868101200302
Cosmology and the Magnetical Philosophy, 1640–1680
J. A. Bennett1

Abstract:

… there is not to be wished a more generall liberty in point of judgment or debate, then what is here allowed. So that there is scarce any Hypothesis, which hath been formerly or lately entertained by Judicious men, and seems to have in it any clearenesse or consistency, but hath here its strenuous Assertours, as the Atomical... … there is not to be wished a more generall liberty in point of judgment or debate, then what is here allowed. So that there is scarce any Hypothesis, which hath been formerly or lately entertained by Judicious men, and seems to have in it any clearenesse or consistency, but hath here its strenuous Assertours, as the Atomicall and Magneticall in Philosophy, the Copernican in Astronomy &c. (John Wilkins on Oxford University, 1654.) read more read less

Topics:

Copernican principle (56%)56% related to the paper, Consistency (negotiation) (54%)54% related to the paper
53 Citations
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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write Journal for the History of Astronomy in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Journal for the History of Astronomy guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Journal for the History of Astronomy guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Journal for the History of Astronomy guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Journal for the History of Astronomy?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Journal for the History of Astronomy citation style.

4. Can I use the Journal for the History of Astronomy templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Journal for the History of Astronomy.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Journal for the History of Astronomy that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Journal for the History of Astronomy that you can download at the end.

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7. Where can I find the template for the Journal for the History of Astronomy?

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SciSpace's Journal for the History of Astronomy is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

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After writing your paper autoformatting in Journal for the History of Astronomy, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Journal for the History of Astronomy's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Journal for the History of Astronomy?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Journal for the History of Astronomy. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Journal for the History of Astronomy?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Journal for the History of Astronomy are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Journal for the History of Astronomy?

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16. Can I download Journal for the History of Astronomy in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Journal for the History of Astronomy Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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