Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format
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Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format
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Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format Example of Bulletin of Volcanology format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 2588900 e-ISSN: 14320819

Bulletin of Volcanology — Template for authors

Publisher: Springer
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Geochemistry and Petrology #48 of 128 down down by 16 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 302 Published Papers | 1363 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 02/07/2020
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Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

2.032

9% from 2018

Impact factor for Bulletin of Volcanology from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 2.032
2018 2.232
2017 2.423
2016 2.58
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 9% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

4.5

7% from 2019

CiteRatio for Bulletin of Volcanology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 4.5
2019 4.2
2018 4.7
2017 4.7
2016 4.9
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 7% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.945

12% from 2019

SJR for Bulletin of Volcanology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.945
2019 1.071
2018 1.232
2017 1.456
2016 1.735
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 12% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.993

14% from 2019

SNIP for Bulletin of Volcanology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.993
2019 0.873
2018 1.015
2017 1.063
2016 1.072
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 14% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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Bulletin of Volcanology

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Springer

Bulletin of Volcanology

Bulletin of Volcanology was founded in 1922, as Bulletin Volcanologique, and is the official journal of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI). The Bulletin of Volcanology publishes papers on volcanoes, their products, their...... Read More

Geochemistry and Petrology

Earth and Planetary Sciences

i
Last updated on
01 Jul 2020
i
ISSN
0258-8900
i
Impact Factor
High - 1.245
i
Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
SPBASIC
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al, 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Beenakker CWJ (2006) Specular andreev reflection in graphene. Phys Rev Lett 97(6):067,007, URL 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.067007

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF01086757
The thickness, volume and grainsize of tephra fall deposits
David M. Pyle1
01 Jan 1989 - Bulletin of Volcanology

Abstract:

An improved empirical method for the plotting of field data and the calculation of tephra fall volumes is presented. The widely used “area” plots of ln(thickness) against ln(isopach area) are curved, implying an exponential thinning law. Use of ln(thickness)−(area)1/2 diagrams confirm the exponential dependence of many parame... An improved empirical method for the plotting of field data and the calculation of tephra fall volumes is presented. The widely used “area” plots of ln(thickness) against ln(isopach area) are curved, implying an exponential thinning law. Use of ln(thickness)−(area)1/2 diagrams confirm the exponential dependence of many parameters (e.g. thickness, maximum and median clast size) with distance from source, producing linear graphs and allowing volumes to be calculated without undue extrapolation of field data. The agreement between theoretical models of clast dispersion and observation is better than previously thought. Two new quantitative parameters are proposed which describe the rates of thinning of the deposit (bt the thickness half-distance) and the maximum clast size (bc the clast half-distance). Many deposits exhibit different grainsize and thickness thinning rates, with the maximum clast size diminishing 1–3 times slower than the thickness. This implies that the entrained grainsize population influences the morphologic and granulometric patterns of the resulting deposit, in addition to the effects of column height and wind-speed. The grainsize characteristics of a deposit are best described by reference to the half-distance ratio (bc/bt). A new classification scheme is proposed which plots the half-distance ratio against the thickness half-distance and may be contoured in terms of the column height. read more read less

Topics:

Population (51%)51% related to the paper
651 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF01046546
Quantitative models of the fallout and dispersal of tephra from volcanic eruption columns
Steven Carey1, R. S. J. Sparks2
01 Jun 1986 - Bulletin of Volcanology

Abstract:

A theoretical model of clast fallout from convective eruption columns has been developed which quantifies how the maximum clast size dispersal is determined by column height and wind strength. An eruption column consists of a buoyant convecting region which rises to a heightH B where the column density equals that of the a... A theoretical model of clast fallout from convective eruption columns has been developed which quantifies how the maximum clast size dispersal is determined by column height and wind strength. An eruption column consists of a buoyant convecting region which rises to a heightH B where the column density equals that of the atmosphere. AboveH B the column rises further to a heightH T due to excess momentum. BetweenH T andH B the column is forced laterally into the atmosphere to form an upper umbrella region. Within the eruption column, the vertical and horizontal velocity fields can be calculated from exprimental and theoretical studies and consideration of mass continuity. The centreline vertical velocity falls as a nearly linear function over most of the column's height and the velocity decreases as a gaussian function radially away from the centreline. Both column height and vertical velocity are strong functions of magma discharge rate. From calculations of the velocity field and the terminal fall velocity of clasts, a series of particle support envelopes has been constructed which represents positions where the column vertical velocity and terminal velocity are equal for a clast of specific size and density. The maximum range of a clast is determined in the absence of wind by the maximum width of the clast support envelope. The trajectories of clasts leaving their relevant support envelope at its maximum width have been modelled in columns from 6 to 43 km high with no wind and in a wind field. From these calculations the shapes and areas of maximum grain size contours of the air-fall deposit have been predicted. For the no wind case the theoretical isopleths show good agreement with the Fogo A plinian deposit in the Azores. A diagram has been constructed which plots, for a particular clast size, the maximum range normal to the dispersal axis against the downward range. From the diagram the column height (and hence magma discharge rate) and wind velocity can be determined. Historic plinian eruptions of Santa Maria (1902) and Mount St. Helens (1980) give maximum heights of 34 and 19 km respectively and maximum wind speeds at the tropopause of m/s and 30 m/s respectively. Both estimates are in good agreement with observations. The model has been applied to a number of other plinian deposits, including the ultraplinian phase of theA.D. 180 Taupo eruption in New Zealand which had an estimated column height of 51 km and wind velocity of 27 m/s. read more read less

Topics:

Eruption column (59%)59% related to the paper, Pyroclastic fall (54%)54% related to the paper, Vulcanian eruption (53%)53% related to the paper, Wind speed (52%)52% related to the paper, Terminal velocity (51%)51% related to the paper
592 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF02597153
Lateral variation of basalt magma type across continental margins and Island Arcs
Hisashi Kuno1
01 Dec 1966 - Bulletin of Volcanology

Abstract:

Quaternary basalt magmas in the Circum-Pacific belt and island arcs and also in Indonesia change continuously from less alkalic and more siliceous type (tholeiite) on the oceanic side to more alkalic and less siliceous type (alkali olivine basalt) on the continental side. In the northeastern part of the Japanese Islands and i... Quaternary basalt magmas in the Circum-Pacific belt and island arcs and also in Indonesia change continuously from less alkalic and more siliceous type (tholeiite) on the oceanic side to more alkalic and less siliceous type (alkali olivine basalt) on the continental side. In the northeastern part of the Japanese Islands and in Kamchatka, zones of tholeiite, high-alumina basalt, and alkali olivine basalt are arranged parallel to the Pacific coast in the order just named, whereas in the southwestern part of the Japanese Islands, the Aleutian Islands, northwestern United States, New Zealand, and Indonesia, zones of high-alumina basalt and alkali olivine basalt are arranged parallel to the coast. In the Izu-Mariana, Kurile, South Sandwich and Tonga Islands, where deep oceans are present on both sides of the island arcs, only a zone of tholeiite is represented. Thus the lateral variation of magma type is characteristic of the transitional zone between the oceanic and continental structures. Because the variation is continuous, the physico-chemical process attending basalt magma production should also change continuously from the oceanic to continental mantle. Suggested explanations for the lateral variation assuming a homogeneous mantle are: 1) Close correspondence between the variations of depth of earthquake foci in the mantle and of basalt magma type in the Japanese Islands indicates that different magmas are produced at different depths where the earthquakes are generated by stress release: tholeiite at depths around 100 km, high-alumina basalt at depths around 200 km, and alkali olivine basalt at depths greater than 250 km. 2) Primary olivine tholeiite magma is produced at a uniform level of the mantle (100–150 km), and on the oceanic side of the continental margin, it leaves the source region immediately after its production and forms magma reservoirs at shallow depths, perhaps in the crust, where it undergoes fractionation to produce SiO2-oversaturated tholeiite magma, whereas on the continental side, the primary magma forms reservoirs near the source region and stays there long enough to be fractionated to produce alkali olivine basalt magma, and in the intermediate zone, the primary magma forms reservoirs at intermediate depths where it is fractionated to produce high-alumina basalt magma. read more read less

Topics:

Basalt (61%)61% related to the paper, Island arc (56%)56% related to the paper, Continental margin (56%)56% related to the paper, Crust (55%)55% related to the paper, Olivine (54%)54% related to the paper
558 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF01078811
A vesicularity index for pyroclastic deposits
Bruce F. Houghton1, Colin J. N. Wilson2
01 Sep 1989 - Bulletin of Volcanology

Abstract:

The vesicularity of juvenile clasts in pyroclastic deposits gives information on the relative timing of vesiculation and fragmentation, and on the role of magmatic volatiles versus external water in driving explosive eruptions. The vesicularity index and range are defined as the arithmetic mean and total spread of vesicularit... The vesicularity of juvenile clasts in pyroclastic deposits gives information on the relative timing of vesiculation and fragmentation, and on the role of magmatic volatiles versus external water in driving explosive eruptions. The vesicularity index and range are defined as the arithmetic mean and total spread of vesicularity values, respectively. Clast densities are measured for the 16–32 mm size fraction by water immersion techniques and converted to vesicularities using measured dense-rock equivalent densities. The techniques used are applied to four case studies involving magmas of widely varying viscosities and discharge rates: Kilauea Iki 1959 (basalt), Eifel tuff rings (basanite), Mayor Island cone-forming deposits (peralkaline rhyolite) and Taupo 1800 B.P. (calc-alkaline rhyolite). Previous theoretical studies suggested that a spectrum of clast vesicularities should be seen, depending on the magma viscosity, eruption rate, and the presence and timing of magma: water interaction. The new data are consistent with these predictions. In magmatic “dry” eruptions the vesicularity index lies uniformly in the range 70%–80% regardless of magma viscosity. For high viscosities and eruption rates the vesicularity ranges are narrow (< 25%), but broaden to between 30% and 50% as the viscosity and eruption rates are lowered and the volatiles and magma can de-couple. In phreatomagmatic “wet” eruptions, widely varying clast vesicularities reflect complex variations in the relative timing of vesiculation and water-induced fragmentation. Magma:water interaction at an early stage greatly reduces the vesicularity indices (< 40%) and broadens the ranges (as high as 80%), whereas late-stage interaction has only a minor effect on the index and broadens the range to a limited extent. Clast vesicularity represents a useful third parameter in addition to dispersal and fragmentation to characterise pyroclastic deposits. read more read less

Topics:

Phreatomagmatic eruption (56%)56% related to the paper, Explosive eruption (55%)55% related to the paper, Magma (55%)55% related to the paper, Pyroclastic rock (53%)53% related to the paper, Vesicular texture (51%)51% related to the paper
484 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF01081756
Magma-water interactions in subaqueous and emergent basaltic
Peter Kokelaar1
01 Oct 1986 - Bulletin of Volcanology

Abstract:

In the subaqueous growth and emergence of a basaltic volcano clasts are formed by one or a combination of (1) explosive release of magmatic volatiles; (2) explosive expansion and collapse of steam formed at magma-water contact surfaces; (3) explosive expansion of steam following enclosure of water in magma, or entrapment of w... In the subaqueous growth and emergence of a basaltic volcano clasts are formed by one or a combination of (1) explosive release of magmatic volatiles; (2) explosive expansion and collapse of steam formed at magma-water contact surfaces; (3) explosive expansion of steam following enclosure of water in magma, or entrapment of water close to magma; and (4) cooling-contraction These processes, named respectivelymagmatic explosivity, contact-surface steam explosivity, bulk interaction steam explosivity, andcooling-contraction granulation, can be enhanced by mutual interaction and feedback The first three (explosive) processes are limited at certain water depths (hydrostatic pressures) and become increasingly vigorous at shallower levels The depth of onset of magmatic explosivity depends largely on juvenile volatile content; it is up to 200 m for tholeiitic magmas and up to 1 km for alkalic magmas At the depth where formation of clastic deposits becomes predominant over effusion of lavas, magmatic explosivity is subordinate to steam explosivity as a clast-forming process The upward transition to accumulation of dominantly clastic deposits is not simply related to the onset of substantial exsolution of magmatic volatiles and can occur without it Contact-surface explosivity commonly requires initiation by a vigorous impact between magma and water and, although no certain depth limit is known, likelihood of such explosivity decreases rapidly with depth Clast generation by bulk interaction explosivity appears to be restricted to depths much shallower than that of the critical pressure of water, which in sea water is at about 3 km Cooling-contraction granulation can occur in any depth of water, but at shallow levels may be replaced by contact-surface explosivity During continuous eruption under water, tephra can be ejected and deposited within a cupola of steam such that rapid quenching does not occur Emergent volcanoes are characterized by distinctive steam-explosive activity that results primarily from a bulk interaction between rapidly ascending magma and a highly mobile slurry of clastic material, water, and steam The water gets into the vent by flooding across or through the top of the tephra pile, and violent explosions cease when this access is sealed The eruptions during emergence of Surtsey and Capelinhos typify the distinctive explosive activity, the style and controls of which are different from those of maar volcanoes read more read less

Topics:

Volcanic explosivity index (62%)62% related to the paper, Magma (55%)55% related to the paper
461 Citations
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RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
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