Example of Ecotoxicology format
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Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format
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Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format Example of Ecotoxicology format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 9639292 e-ISSN: 15733017

Ecotoxicology — Template for authors

Publisher: Springer
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law #94 of 355 down down by 47 ranks
Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis #57 of 134 down down by 17 ranks
Toxicology #63 of 122 down down by 11 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 530 Published Papers | 2238 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 19/07/2020
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

2.535

3% from 2018

Impact factor for Ecotoxicology from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 2.535
2018 2.46
2017 1.987
2016 1.951
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 3% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

4.2

9% from 2019

CiteRatio for Ecotoxicology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 4.2
2019 4.6
2018 4.3
2017 4.1
2016 4.0
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has decreased by 9% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.72

6% from 2019

SJR for Ecotoxicology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.72
2019 0.764
2018 0.723
2017 0.797
2016 0.797
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 6% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.891

14% from 2019

SNIP for Ecotoxicology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.891
2019 1.034
2018 0.874
2017 0.786
2016 0.849
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 14% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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Ecotoxicology

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Springer

Ecotoxicology

Ecotoxicology is an international journal devoted to the publication of fundamental research on the effects of toxic chemicals on populations, communities and terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. It aims to elucidate mechanisms and processes whereby chemicals exert t...... Read More

Medicine

i
Last updated on
19 Jul 2020
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ISSN
0963-9292
i
Impact Factor
High - 1.079
i
Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
SPBASIC
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al, 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Beenakker CWJ (2006) Specular andreev reflection in graphene. Phys Rev Lett 97(6):067,007, URL 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.067007

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S10646-008-0214-0
Environmental behavior and ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to algae, plants, and fungi
07 May 2008 - Ecotoxicology

Abstract:

Developments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance for their aggregation behavior,... Developments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance for their aggregation behavior, and thus for their mobility in aquatic and terrestrial systems and for their interactions with algae, plants and, fungi. Interactions of ENPs with natural organic matter have to be considered as well, as those will alter the ENPs aggregation behavior in surface waters or in soils. Cells of plants, algae, and fungi possess cell walls that constitute a primary site for interaction and a barrier for the entrance of ENPs. Mechanisms allowing ENPs to pass through cell walls and membranes are as yet poorly understood. Inside cells, ENPs might directly provoke alterations of membranes and other cell structures and molecules, as well as protective mechanisms. Indirect effects of ENPs depend on their chemical and physical properties and may include physical restraints (clogging effects), solubilization of toxic ENP compounds, or production of reactive oxygen species. Many questions regarding the bioavailability of ENPs, their uptake by algae, plants, and fungi and the toxicity mechanisms remain to be elucidated. read more read less
View PDF
1,356 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00118995
Development and evaluation of sediment quality guidelines for Florida coastal waters.
Donald D. MacDonald, R. Scott Carr1, Fred D. Calder2, Edward R. Long3, Christopher G. Ingersoll
01 Aug 1996 - Ecotoxicology

Abstract:

The weight-of-evidence approach to the development of sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) was modified to support the derivation of biological effects-based SQGs for Florida coastal waters. Numerical SQGs were derived for 34 substances, including nine trace metals, 13 individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three g... The weight-of-evidence approach to the development of sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) was modified to support the derivation of biological effects-based SQGs for Florida coastal waters. Numerical SQGs were derived for 34 substances, including nine trace metals, 13 individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three groups of PAHs, total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven pesticides and one phthalate ester. For each substance, a threshold effects level (TEL) and a probable effects level (PEL) was calculated. These two values defined three ranges of chemical concentrations, including those that were (1) rarely, (2) occasionally or (3) frequently associated with adverse effects. The SQGs were then evaluated to determine their degree of agreement with other guidelines (an indicator of comparability) and the percent incidence of adverse effects within each concentration range (an indicator of reliability). The guidelines also were used to classify (using a dichotomous system: toxic, with one or more exceedances of the PELs or non-toxic, with no exceedances of the TELs) sediment samples collected from various locations in Florida and the Gulf of Mexico. The accuracy of these predictions was then evaluated using the results of the biological tests that were performed on the same sediment samples. The resultant SQGs were demonstrated to provide practical, reliable and predictive tools for assessing sediment quality in Florida and elsewhere in the southeastern portion of the United States. read more read less
View PDF
970 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S10646-008-0199-8
The ecotoxicology and chemistry of manufactured nanoparticles
Richard D. Handy1, Frank von der Kammer2, Jamie R. Lead3, Martin Hassellöv4, Richard Owen5, Mark Crane
19 Mar 2008 - Ecotoxicology

Abstract:

The emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also outlined. The emerging eco... The emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also outlined. The emerging ecotoxicological literature shows toxic effects on fish and invertebrates, often at low mg l−1 concentrations of nanoparticles. However, data on bacteria, plants, and terrestrial species are particularly lacking at present. Initial data suggest that at least some manufactured nanoparticles may interact with other contaminants, influencing their ecotoxicity. Particle behaviour is influenced by particle size, shape, surface charge, and the presence of other materials in the environment. Nanoparticles tend to aggregate in hard water and seawater, and are greatly influenced by the specific type of organic matter or other natural particles (colloids) present in freshwater. The state of dispersion will alter ecotoxicity, but many abiotic factors that influence this, such as pH, salinity, and the presence of organic matter remain to be systematically investigated as part of ecotoxicological studies. Concentrations of manufactured nanoparticles have rarely been measured in the environment to date. Various techniques are available to characterise nanoparticles for exposure and dosimetry, although each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages for the ecotoxicologist. We conclude with a consideration of implications for environmental risk assessment of manufactured nanoparticles. read more read less
805 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S10646-008-0206-0
The ecotoxicology of nanoparticles and nanomaterials: current status, knowledge gaps, challenges, and future needs
Richard D. Handy1, Richard Owen2, Eugenia Valsami-Jones3
12 Apr 2008 - Ecotoxicology

Abstract:

This paper introduces a special issue on the ecotoxicology and environmental chemistry of nanoparticles (NPs), and nanomaterials (NMs), in the journal Ecotoxicology. There are many types of NMs and the scientific community is making observations on NP ecotoxicity to inform the wider debate about the risks and benefits of thes... This paper introduces a special issue on the ecotoxicology and environmental chemistry of nanoparticles (NPs), and nanomaterials (NMs), in the journal Ecotoxicology. There are many types of NMs and the scientific community is making observations on NP ecotoxicity to inform the wider debate about the risks and benefits of these materials. Natural NPs have existed in the environment since the beginning of Earth’s history, and natural sources can be found in volcanic dust, most natural waters, soils and sediments. Natural NPs are generated by a wide variety of geological and biological processes, and while there is evidence that some natural NPs can be toxic, organisms have also evolved in an environment containing natural NPs. There are concerns that natural nano-scale process could be influenced by the presence of pollution. Manufactured NPs show some complex colloid and aggregation chemistry, which is likely to be affected by particle shape, size, surface area and surface charge, as well as the adsorption properties of the material. Abiotic factors such as pH, ionic strength, water hardness and the presence of organic matter will alter aggregation chemistry; and are expected to influence toxicity. The physico-chemistry is essential to understanding of the fate and behaviour of NPs in the environment, as well as uptake and distribution within organisms, and the interactions of NPs with other pollutants. Data on biological effects show that NPs can be toxic to bacteria, algae, invertebrates and fish species, as well as mammals. However, much of the ecotoxicological data is limited to species used in regulatory testing and freshwater organism. Data on bacteria, terrestrial species, marine species and higher plants is particularly lacking. Detailed investigations of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) remain to be performed on species from the major phyla, although there are some data on fish. The environmental risk assessment of NMs could be performed using the existing tiered approach and regulatory framework, but with modifications to methodology including chemical characterisation of the materials being used. There are many challenges ahead, and controversies (e.g., reference substances for ecotoxicology), but knowledge transfer from mammalian toxicology, colloid chemistry, as well as material and geological sciences, will enable ecotoxicology studies to move forward in this new multi-disciplinary field. read more read less

Topics:

Ecotoxicology (51%)51% related to the paper
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760 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S10646-012-0863-X
Neonicotinoids in bees: a review on concentrations, side-effects and risk assessment
Tsjeerd Blacquière1, Guy Smagghe2, Cornelis A.M. van Gestel3, Veerle Mommaerts2
18 Feb 2012 - Ecotoxicology

Abstract:

Neonicotinoid insecticides are successfully applied to control pests in a variety of agricultural crops; however, they may not only affect pest insects but also non-target organisms such as pollinators. This review summarizes, for the first time, 15 years of research on the hazards of neonicotinoids to bees including honey be... Neonicotinoid insecticides are successfully applied to control pests in a variety of agricultural crops; however, they may not only affect pest insects but also non-target organisms such as pollinators. This review summarizes, for the first time, 15 years of research on the hazards of neonicotinoids to bees including honey bees, bumble bees and solitary bees. The focus of the paper is on three different key aspects determining the risks of neonicotinoid field concentrations for bee populations: (1) the environmental neonicotinoid residue levels in plants, bees and bee products in relation to pesticide application, (2) the reported side-effects with special attention for sublethal effects, and (3) the usefulness for the evaluation of neonicotinoids of an already existing risk assessment scheme for systemic compounds. Although environmental residue levels of neonicotinoids were found to be lower than acute/chronic toxicity levels, there is still a lack of reliable data as most analyses were conducted near the detection limit and for only few crops. Many laboratory studies described lethal and sublethal effects of neonicotinoids on the foraging behavior, and learning and memory abilities of bees, while no effects were observed in field studies at field-realistic dosages. The proposed risk assessment scheme for systemic compounds was shown to be applicable to assess the risk for side-effects of neonicotinoids as it considers the effect on different life stages and different levels of biological organization (organism versus colony). Future research studies should be conducted with field-realistic concentrations, relevant exposure and evaluation durations. Molecular markers may be used to improve risk assessment by a better understanding of the mode of action (interaction with receptors) of neonicotinoids in bees leading to the identification of environmentally safer compounds. read more read less

Topics:

Pesticide toxicity to bees (69%)69% related to the paper, Honey bee (59%)59% related to the paper, Neonicotinoid (51%)51% related to the paper
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732 Citations
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Ecotoxicology format uses SPBASIC citation style.

Automatically format and order your citations and bibliography in a click.

SciSpace allows imports from all reference managers like Mendeley, Zotero, Endnote, Google Scholar etc.

Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Ecotoxicology guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Ecotoxicology citation style.

You can avail our Free Trial for 7 days. I'm sure you'll find our features very helpful. Plus, it's quite inexpensive.

Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Ecotoxicology's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

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After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

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After uploading your paper on SciSpace, you would see a button to request a journal submission service for Ecotoxicology.

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Yes. SciSpace provides this functionality.

After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Ecotoxicology Endnote style, according to springer guidelines.

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