Example of Molecular Breeding format
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Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format
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Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format Example of Molecular Breeding format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 13803743 e-ISSN: 15729788

Molecular Breeding — Template for authors

Publisher: Springer
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Agronomy and Crop Science #63 of 347 down down by 31 ranks
Plant Science #89 of 445 down down by 38 ranks
Biotechnology #114 of 282 down down by 52 ranks
Genetics #156 of 325 down down by 35 ranks
Molecular Biology #236 of 382 down down by 59 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 570 Published Papers | 2364 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 03/07/2020
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

2.149

15% from 2018

Impact factor for Molecular Breeding from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 2.149
2018 1.862
2017 2.077
2016 2.465
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 15% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

4.1

11% from 2019

CiteRatio for Molecular Breeding from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 4.1
2019 3.7
2018 4.2
2017 4.9
2016 4.2
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 11% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.833

8% from 2019

SJR for Molecular Breeding from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.833
2019 0.909
2018 0.978
2017 1.139
2016 1.085
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 8% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.855

11% from 2019

SNIP for Molecular Breeding from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.855
2019 0.96
2018 0.906
2017 0.995
2016 0.983
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 11% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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Molecular Breeding

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Springer

Molecular Breeding

Molecular Breeding is an international journal publishing papers on applications of plant molecular biology, i.e., research most likely leading to practical applications. The practical applications might relate to the Developing as well as the industrialised World and have dem...... Read More

Agronomy and Crop Science

Plant Science

Biotechnology

Genetics

Molecular Biology

Agricultural and Biological Sciences

i
Last updated on
03 Jul 2020
i
ISSN
1380-3743
i
Impact Factor
High - 2.465
i
Acceptance Rate
Not provided
i
Frequency
Not provided
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
SPBASIC
i
Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al, 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Beenakker CWJ (2006) Specular andreev reflection in graphene. Phys Rev Lett 97(6):067,007, URL 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.067007

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00564200
The comparison of RFLP, RAPD, AFLP and SSR (microsatellite) markers for germplasm analysis
01 Jan 1996 - Molecular Breeding

Abstract:

The utility of RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism), RAPD (random-amplified polymorphic DNA), AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) and SSR (simple sequence repeat, microsatellite) markers in soybean germplasm analysis was determined by evaluating information content (expected heterozygosity), number of loc... The utility of RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism), RAPD (random-amplified polymorphic DNA), AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) and SSR (simple sequence repeat, microsatellite) markers in soybean germplasm analysis was determined by evaluating information content (expected heterozygosity), number of loci simultaneously analyzed per experiment (multiplex ratio) and effectiveness in assessing relationships between accessions. SSR markers have the highest expected heterozygosity (0.60), while AFLP markers have the highest effective multiplex ratio (19). A single parameter, defined as the marker index, which is the product of expected heterozygosity and multiplex ratio, may be used to evaluate overall utility of a marker system. A comparison of genetic similarity matrices revealed that, if the comparison involved both cultivated (Glycine max) and wild soybean (Glycine soja) accessions, estimates based on RFLPs, AFLPs and SSRs are highly correlated, indicating congruence between these assays. However, correlations of RAPD marker data with those obtained using other marker systems were lower. This is because RAPDs produce higher estimates of interspecific similarities. If the comparisons involvedG. max only, then overall correlations between marker systems are significantly lower. WithinG. max, RAPD and AFLP similarity estimates are more closely correlated than those involving other marker systems. read more read less

Topics:

RAPD (59%)59% related to the paper, Amplified fragment length polymorphism (56%)56% related to the paper, Restriction fragment length polymorphism (54%)54% related to the paper, Microsatellite (52%)52% related to the paper
2,377 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1023/A:1009612517139
Reproducibility testing of RAPD, AFLP and SSR markers in plants by a network of European laboratories
01 Jan 1997 - Molecular Breeding

Abstract:

A number of PCR-based techniques can be used to detect polymorphisms in plants. For their wide-scale usage in germplasm characterisation and breeding it is important that these marker technologies can be exchanged between laboratories, which in turn requires that they can be standardised to yield reproducible results, so that... A number of PCR-based techniques can be used to detect polymorphisms in plants. For their wide-scale usage in germplasm characterisation and breeding it is important that these marker technologies can be exchanged between laboratories, which in turn requires that they can be standardised to yield reproducible results, so that direct collation and comparison of the data are possible. This article describes a network experiment involving several European laboratories, in which the reproducibility of three popular molecular marker techniques was examined: random-amplified fragment length polymorphism (RAPD), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and sequence-tagged microsatellites (SSR). For each technique, an optimal system was chosen, which had been standardised and routinely used by one laboratory. This system (genetic screening package) was distributed to different participating laboratories in the network and the results obtained compared with those of the original sender. Different experiences were gained in this exchange experiment with the different techniques. RAPDs proved difficult to reproduce. For AFLPs, a single-band difference was observed in one track, whilst SSR alleles were amplified by all laboratories, but small differences in their sizing were obtained. read more read less

Topics:

RAPD (53%)53% related to the paper, Amplified fragment length polymorphism (52%)52% related to the paper
879 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1023/A:1009651919792
Genome mapping, molecular markers and marker-assisted selection in crop plants
M. Mohan1, Suresh Nair1, Anjali Bhagwat2, T. G. Krishna2, Masahiro Yano3, C.R. Bhatia, Takuji Sasaki3
01 Jan 1997 - Molecular Breeding

Abstract:

Applications of genome mapping and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in crop improvement are reviewed. The following aspects are considered: a comparison of the choice of markers available for the generation of linkage maps (including amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP); restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFL... Applications of genome mapping and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in crop improvement are reviewed. The following aspects are considered: a comparison of the choice of markers available for the generation of linkage maps (including amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP); restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP); randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeats (SSR)); quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis; use of molecular markers in the exploitation of hybrid vigour; physical genome mapping; map-based cloning and transposon tagging of agriculturally important genes; synteny in cereal genomes; and the use of MAS in breeding for disease and pest resistance. read more read less

Topics:

Family-based QTL mapping (60%)60% related to the paper, Gene mapping (59%)59% related to the paper, Amplified fragment length polymorphism (59%)59% related to the paper, Restriction fragment length polymorphism (59%)59% related to the paper, Marker-assisted selection (57%)57% related to the paper
724 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1023/A:1009604312050
QGENE: software for marker-based genomic analysis and breeding
James C. Nelson1
01 Jun 1997 - Molecular Breeding

Abstract:

Efficient use of DNA markers for genomic research and crop improvement will depend as much on computational tools as on laboratory technology. The large size and multidimensional character of marker datasets invite novel approaches to data visualization. Described here is a software application embodying two design principles... Efficient use of DNA markers for genomic research and crop improvement will depend as much on computational tools as on laboratory technology. The large size and multidimensional character of marker datasets invite novel approaches to data visualization. Described here is a software application embodying two design principles: conventional reduction of raw genetic marker data to numerical summary statistics, and fast, interactive graphical display of both data and statistics. The program performs various analyses for mapping quantitative-trait loci in real or simulated datasets and other analyses in aid of phenotypic and marker-assisted breeding. Functionality is described and some output is illustrated. read more read less

Topics:

Data visualization (50%)50% related to the paper
607 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S11032-013-9917-X
Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping using Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP): overview of the technology and its application in crop improvement
Kassa Semagn1, Raman Babu1, Sarah Hearne1, Michael Olsen1
01 Jan 2014 - Molecular Breeding

Abstract:

Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data can be obtained using one of the numerous uniplex or multiplex SNP genotyping platforms that combine a variety of chemistries, detection methods, and reaction formats. Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP) is one of the uniplex SNP genotyping platforms, and has evolved to be a global... Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data can be obtained using one of the numerous uniplex or multiplex SNP genotyping platforms that combine a variety of chemistries, detection methods, and reaction formats. Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP) is one of the uniplex SNP genotyping platforms, and has evolved to be a global benchmark technology. However, there are no publications relating either to the technology itself or to its application in crop improvement programs. In this review, we provide an overview of the different aspects of the KASP genotyping platform, discuss its application in crop improvement, and compare it with the chip-based Illumina GoldenGate platform. The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center routinely uses KASP, generating in excess of a million data points annually for crop improvement purposes. We found that (1) 81 % of the SNPs used in a custom-designed GoldenGate assay were transferable to KASP; (2) using KASP, negative controls (no template) consistently clustered together and rarely produced signals exceeding the threshold values for allele calling, in contrast to the situation observed using GoldenGate assays; (3) KASP’s average genotyping error in positive control DNA samples was 0.7–1.6 %, which is lower than that observed using GoldenGate (2.0–2.4 %); (4) KASP genotyping costs for marker-assisted recurrent selection were 7.9–46.1 % cheaper than those of the BeadXpress and GoldenGate platforms; and (5) KASP offers cost-effective and scalable flexibility in applications that require small to moderate numbers of markers, such as quality control analysis, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in bi-parental populations, marker-assisted recurrent selection, marker-assisted backcrossing, and QTL fine mapping. read more read less

Topics:

Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP) (70%)70% related to the paper, SNP genotyping (57%)57% related to the paper, Genotyping (52%)52% related to the paper
554 Citations
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Molecular Breeding format uses SPBASIC citation style.

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One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Molecular Breeding's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

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To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
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SciSpace would allow download of your references in Molecular Breeding Endnote style, according to springer guidelines.

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