Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format
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Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format
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Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format Example of Journal of Cellular Physiology format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 219541 e-ISSN: 10974652

Journal of Cellular Physiology — Template for authors

Publisher: Wiley
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Clinical Biochemistry #12 of 113 up up by 6 ranks
Physiology #23 of 169 up up by 10 ranks
Cell Biology #51 of 279 up up by 32 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 4033 Published Papers | 35913 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 07/06/2020
Insights & related journals
General info
Top papers
Popular templates
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

5.546

23% from 2018

Impact factor for Journal of Cellular Physiology from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 5.546
2018 4.522
2017 3.923
2016 4.08
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 23% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

8.9

71% from 2019

CiteRatio for Journal of Cellular Physiology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 8.9
2019 5.2
2018 5.8
2017 7.0
2016 7.6
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 71% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

1.529

21% from 2019

SJR for Journal of Cellular Physiology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.529
2019 1.267
2018 1.445
2017 1.641
2016 1.767
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 21% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.245

5% from 2019

SNIP for Journal of Cellular Physiology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.245
2019 1.186
2018 1.094
2017 1.024
2016 1.046
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 5% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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Springer

CiteRatio: 15.7 | SJR: 1.061 | SNIP: 2.057
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CiteRatio: 11.4 | SJR: 2.182 | SNIP: 1.902

Journal of Cellular Physiology

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Wiley

Journal of Cellular Physiology

The Journal of Cellular Physiology publishes reports of high biological significance in areas of eukaryotic cell biology and physiology, focusing on those articles that adopt a molecular mechanistic approach to investigate cell structure and function. There is appreciation for...... Read More

Clinical Biochemistry

Physiology

Cell Biology

Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology

i
Last updated on
07 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0021-9541
i
Impact Factor
High - 1.117
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
apa
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
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Bibliography Example
Beenakker, C.W.J. (2006) Specular andreev reflection in graphene.Phys. Rev. Lett., 97 (6), 067 007. URL 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.067007.

Top papers written in this journal

The Ki‐67 protein: From the known and the unknown

Abstract:

The expression of the human Ki-67 protein is strictly associated with cell proliferation. During interphase, the antigen can be exclusively detected within the nucleus, whereas in mitosis most of the protein is relocated to the surface of the chromosomes. The fact that the Ki-67 protein is present during all active phases of ... The expression of the human Ki-67 protein is strictly associated with cell proliferation. During interphase, the antigen can be exclusively detected within the nucleus, whereas in mitosis most of the protein is relocated to the surface of the chromosomes. The fact that the Ki-67 protein is present during all active phases of the cell cycle (G(1), S, G(2), and mitosis), but is absent from resting cells (G(0)), makes it an excellent marker for determining the so-called growth fraction of a given cell population. In the first part of this study, the term proliferation marker is discussed and examples of the applications of anti-Ki-67 protein antibodies in diagnostics of human tumors are given. The fraction of Ki-67-positive tumor cells (the Ki-67 labeling index) is often correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The best-studied examples in this context are carcinomas of the prostate and the breast. For these types of tumors, the prognostic value for survival and tumor recurrence has repeatedly been proven in uni- and multivariate analysis. The preparation of new monoclonal antibodies that react with the Ki-67 equivalent protein from rodents now extends the use of the Ki-67 protein as a proliferation marker to laboratory animals that are routinely used in basic research. The second part of this review focuses on the biology of the Ki-67 protein. Our current knowledge of the Ki-67 gene and protein structure, mRNA splicing, expression, and cellular localization during the cell-division cycle is summarized and discussed. Although the Ki-67 protein is well characterized on the molecular level and extensively used as a proliferation marker, the functional significance still remains unclear. There are indications, however, that Ki-67 protein expression is an absolute requirement for progression through the cell-division cycle. read more read less

Topics:

Retinoblastoma-like protein 1 (66%)66% related to the paper, Ki-67 (63%)63% related to the paper, Proliferation Marker (60%)60% related to the paper, Cell cycle (59%)59% related to the paper, Cellular localization (56%)56% related to the paper
4,050 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1002/JCP.1040910303
Conditions controlling the proliferation of haemopoietic stem cells in vitro.
T. M. Dexter, T. D. Allen, L. G. Lajtha

Abstract:

A liquid culture system is described whereby proliferation of haemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S), production of granulocyte precursor cells (CFU-C), and extensive granulopoiesis can be maintained in vitro for several months. Such cultures consist of adherent and non-adherent populations of cells. The adherent population contains... A liquid culture system is described whereby proliferation of haemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S), production of granulocyte precursor cells (CFU-C), and extensive granulopoiesis can be maintained in vitro for several months. Such cultures consist of adherent and non-adherent populations of cells. The adherent population contains phagocytic mononuclear cells, “epithelial” cells, and “giant fat” cells. The latter appear to be particularly important for stem cell maintenance and furthermore there is a strong tendency for maturing granulocytes to selectively cluster in and around areas of “giant fat” cell aggregations. By “feeding” the cultures at weekly intervals, between 10 to 15 “population doublings” of functionally normal CFU-S regularly occurs. Increased “population doublings” may be obtained by feeding twice weekly. The cultures show initially extensive granulopoiesis followed, in a majority of cases, by an accumulation of blast cells. Eventually both blast cells and granulocytes decline and the cultures contain predominantly phagocytic mononuclear cells. Culturing at 33°C leads to the development of a more profuse growth of adherent cells and these cultures show better maintenance of stem cells and increased cell density. When tested for colony stimulating activity (CSA) the cultures were uniformly negative. Addition of exogenous CSA caused a rapid decline in stem cells, reduced granulopoiesis and an accumulation of phagocytic mononuclear cells. read more read less

Topics:

Granulopoiesis (61%)61% related to the paper, Stem cell (61%)61% related to the paper, Granulocyte Precursor Cells (56%)56% related to the paper, Population (52%)52% related to the paper, Precursor cell (51%)51% related to the paper
2,157 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1002/JCP.10119
Cellular response to oxidative stress: signaling for suicide and survival.
Jennifer L. Martindale1, Nikki J. Holbrook1, Nikki J. Holbrook2

Abstract:

Reactive oxygen species (ROS), whether produced endogenously as a consequence of normal cell functions or derived from external sources, pose a constant threat to cells living in an aerobic environment as they can result in severe damage to DNA, protein, and lipids. The importance of oxidative damage to the pathogenesis of ma... Reactive oxygen species (ROS), whether produced endogenously as a consequence of normal cell functions or derived from external sources, pose a constant threat to cells living in an aerobic environment as they can result in severe damage to DNA, protein, and lipids. The importance of oxidative damage to the pathogenesis of many diseases as well as to degenerative processes of aging has becoming increasingly apparent over the past few years. Cells contain a number of antioxidant defenses to minimize fluctuations in ROS, but ROS generation often exceeds the cell's antioxidant capacity, resulting in a condition termed oxidative stress. Host survival depends upon the ability of cells and tissues to adapt to or resist the stress, and repair or remove damaged molecules or cells. Numerous stress response mechanisms have evolved for these purposes, and they are rapidly activated in response to oxidative insults. Some of the pathways are preferentially linked to enhanced survival, while others are more frequently associated with cell death. Still others have been implicated in both extremes depending on the particular circumstances. In this review, we discuss the various signaling pathways known to be activated in response to oxidative stress in mammalian cells, the mechanisms leading to their activation, and their roles in influencing cell survival. These pathways constitute important avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at limiting oxidative damage or attenuating its sequelae. read more read less

Topics:

Oxidative stress (57%)57% related to the paper
View PDF
2,089 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1002/JCP.21200
Adult mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering versus regenerative medicine.
Arnold I. Caplan1

Abstract:

Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from bone marrow or marrow aspirates and because they are culture-dish adherent, they can be expanded in culture while maintaining their multipotency. The MSCs have been used in preclinical models for tissue engineering of bone, cartilage, muscle, marrow stroma, tendon, fat,... Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from bone marrow or marrow aspirates and because they are culture-dish adherent, they can be expanded in culture while maintaining their multipotency. The MSCs have been used in preclinical models for tissue engineering of bone, cartilage, muscle, marrow stroma, tendon, fat, and other connective tissues. These tissue-engineered materials show considerable promise for use in rebuilding damaged or diseased mesenchymal tissues. Unanticipated is the realization that the MSCs secrete a large spectrum of bioactive molecules. These molecules are immunosuppressive, especially for T-cells and, thus, allogeneic MSCs can be considered for therapeutic use. In this context, the secreted bioactive molecules provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured adult tissues to limit the area of damage and to mount a self-regulated regenerative response. This regenerative microenvironment is referred to as trophic activity and, therefore, MSCs appear to be valuable mediators for tissue repair and regeneration. The natural titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury can be augmented by allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream. Indeed, human clinical trials are now under way to use allogeneic MSCs for treatment of myocardial infarcts, graft-versus-host disease, Crohn's Disease, cartilage and meniscus repair, stroke, and spinal cord injury. This review summarizes the biological basis for the in vivo functioning of MSCs through development and aging. read more read less

Topics:

Stem cell transplantation for articular cartilage repair (66%)66% related to the paper, Clinical uses of mesenchymal stem cells (62%)62% related to the paper, Mesenchymal stem cell (57%)57% related to the paper, Regenerative medicine (56%)56% related to the paper, Tissue engineering (53%)53% related to the paper
View PDF
1,780 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1002/JCP.1041430304
Progressive development of the rat osteoblast phenotype in vitro: Reciprocal relationships in expression of genes associated with osteoblast proliferation and differentiation during formation of the bone extracellular matrix

Abstract:

The relationship of cell proliferation to the temporal expression of genes characterizing a developmental sequence associated with bone cell differentiation was examined in primary diploid cultures of fetal calvarial derived osteoblasts by the combined use of autoradiography, histochemistry, biochemistry, and mRNA assays of o... The relationship of cell proliferation to the temporal expression of genes characterizing a developmental sequence associated with bone cell differentiation was examined in primary diploid cultures of fetal calvarial derived osteoblasts by the combined use of autoradiography, histochemistry, biochemistry, and mRNA assays of osteoblast cell growth and phenotypic genes. Modifications in gene expression define a developmental sequence that has 1) three principle periods–;proliferation, extracellular matrix maturation, and mineralization–;and 2) two restriction points to which the cells can progress but cannot pass without further signal–;the first when proliferation is down-regulated and gene expression associated with extracellular matrix maturation is induced, and the second when mineralization occurs. Initially, actively proliferating cells, expressing cell cycle-and cell growth-regulated genes, produce a fibronectin/type I collagen extracel-lular matrix. A reciprocal and functionally coupled relationship between the decline in proliferative activity and the subsequent induction of genes associated with matrix maturation and mineralization is supported by 1) a temporal sequence of events in which there is an enhanced expression of alkaline phos-phatase immediately following the proliferative period, and later, an increased expression of osteocalcin and osteopontin at the onset of mineralization; 2) increased expression of a specific subset of osteoblast phenotype markers, alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin, when proliferation is inhibited by hydroxyurea; and 3) enhanced levels of expression of the osteoblast markers as a function of ascorbic acid-induced collagen deposition, suggesting that the extracellular matrix contributes to both the shutdown of proliferation and the development of the osteoblast phenotype. read more read less

Topics:

Osteoblast (61%)61% related to the paper, Fibronectin (59%)59% related to the paper, Cellular differentiation (57%)57% related to the paper, Extracellular matrix (57%)57% related to the paper, Osteopontin (54%)54% related to the paper
1,476 Citations
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Journal of Cellular Physiology format uses apa citation style.

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Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Journal of Cellular Physiology guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Journal of Cellular Physiology citation style.

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Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Journal of Cellular Physiology's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

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After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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S. No. Citation Style Type
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After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Journal of Cellular Physiology Endnote style, according to wiley guidelines.

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