Example of Systematic Entomology format
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Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format
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Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format Example of Systematic Entomology format
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Systematic Entomology — Template for authors

Publisher: Wiley
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Insect Science #4 of 153 down down by 1 rank
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics #52 of 647 down down by 14 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 217 Published Papers | 1517 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 11/06/2020
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Related Journals

open access Open Access
recommended Recommended

Wiley

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 4.5
SJR: 1.028
SNIP: 1.216
open access Open Access

Wiley

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 5.1
SJR: 1.061
SNIP: 1.101
open access Open Access

Springer

Quality:  
Good
CiteRatio: 3.1
SJR: 0.65
SNIP: 0.87
open access Open Access

Springer

Quality:  
Good
CiteRatio: 2.6
SJR: 0.649
SNIP: 0.832

Journal Performance & Insights

Impact Factor

CiteRatio

Determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.909

5% from 2018

Impact factor for Systematic Entomology from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 3.909
2018 3.727
2017 4.237
2016 4.474
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

7.0

8% from 2019

CiteRatio for Systematic Entomology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 7.0
2019 6.5
2018 8.5
2017 7.7
2016 7.3
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 5% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 8% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.552

6% from 2019

SJR for Systematic Entomology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.552
2019 1.659
2018 1.897
2017 1.508
2016 2.028
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

2.646

1% from 2019

SNIP for Systematic Entomology from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.646
2019 2.632
2018 2.702
2017 2.797
2016 3.22
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 6% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 1% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.
Systematic Entomology

Guideline source: View

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Wiley

Systematic Entomology

Systematic Entomology encourages the submission of taxonomic papers on insects that contain information of interest to a wider audience, e.g. papers bearing on the theoretical, genetic, agricultural, medical and biodiversity issues. Emphasis is also placed on the selection of ...... Read More

Insect Science

Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Agricultural and Biological Sciences

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Last updated on
11 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0307-6970
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Impact Factor
High - 2.22
i
Open Access
Yes
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
apa
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
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Bibliography Example
Beenakker, C.W.J. (2006) Specular andreev reflection in graphene.Phys. Rev. Lett., 97 (6), 067 007. URL 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.067007.

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1111/J.1365-3113.1995.TB00102.X
Identification guide to the ant genera of the world
01 Oct 1995 - Systematic Entomology

Topics:

Identification (biology) (60%)60% related to the paper
View PDF
364 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1111/SYEN.12132
The beetle tree of life reveals that Coleoptera survived end‐Permian mass extinction to diversify during the Cretaceous terrestrial revolution
01 Oct 2015 - Systematic Entomology

Abstract:

© 2015 The Authors. Systematic Entomology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Entomological Society This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons AttributionߚNonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly... © 2015 The Authors. Systematic Entomology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Entomological Society This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons AttributionߚNonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. read more read less

Topics:

Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution (52%)52% related to the paper, Systematic Entomology (52%)52% related to the paper
333 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1111/SYEN.12090
The evolution of myrmicine ants: phylogeny and biogeography of a hyperdiverse ant clade (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
Philip S. Ward1, Seán G. Brady2, Brian L. Fisher3, Ted R. Schultz2
01 Jan 2015 - Systematic Entomology

Abstract:

This study investigates the evolutionary history of a hyperdiverse clade, the ant subfamily Myrmicinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), based on analyses of a data matrix comprising 251 species and 11 nuclear gene fragments. Under both maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods of inference, we recover a robust phylogeny that reveals ... This study investigates the evolutionary history of a hyperdiverse clade, the ant subfamily Myrmicinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), based on analyses of a data matrix comprising 251 species and 11 nuclear gene fragments. Under both maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods of inference, we recover a robust phylogeny that reveals six major clades of Myrmicinae, here treated as newly defined tribes and occur- ring as a pectinate series: Myrmicini, Pogonomyrmecini trib.n., Stenammini, Solenop- sidini, Attini and Crematogastrini. Because we condense the former 25 myrmicine tribes into a new six-tribe scheme, membership in some tribes is now notably different, espe- cially regarding Attini. We demonstrate that the monotypic genus Ankylomyrma is nei- ther in the Myrmicinae nor even a member of the more inclusive formicoid clade - rather it is a poneroid ant, sister to the genus Tatuidris (Agroecomyrmecinae). Several species-rich myrmicine genera are shown to be nonmonophyletic, including Pogono- myrmex, Aphaenogaster, Messor, Monomorium, Pheidole, Temnothorax andTetramor- ium. We propose a number of generic synonymies to partially alleviate these problems (senior synonym listed first): Pheidole = Anisopheidole syn.n. = Machomyrma syn.n.; Temnothorax = Chalepoxenus syn.n. = Myrmoxenus syn.n. = Protomognathus syn.n.; Tetramorium = Rhoptromyrmex syn.n. = Anergates syn.n. = Teleutomyrmex syn.n. The genus Veromessor stat.r. is resurrected for the New World species previously placed in Messor; Syllophopsis stat.r. is resurrected from synonymy under Monomorium to contain the species in the hildebrandti group;Trichomyrmex stat.r. is resurrected from synonymy underMonomorium to contain the species in the scabriceps- anddestruc- tor-groups; and the monotypic genus Epelysidris stat.r. is reinstated for Monomorium brocha. Bayesian divergence dating indicates that the crown group Myrmicinae origi- nated about 98.6 Ma (95% highest probability density 87.9-109.6 Ma) but the six major clades are considerably younger, with age estimates ranging from 52.3 to 71.1 Ma. Although these and other suprageneric taxa arose mostly in the middle Eocene or earlier, a number of prominent, species-rich genera, such as Pheidole, Cephalotes, Strumigenys, Crematogaster andTetramorium, have estimated crown group origins in the late Eocene or Oligocene. Most myrmicine species diversity resides in the two sister clades, Attini and Crematogastrini, which are estimated to have originated and diversified extensively in the Neotropics and Paleotropics, respectively. The newly circumscribed Myrmicini is Holarctic in distribution, and ancestral range estimation suggests a Nearctic origin. The Pogonomyrmecini and Solenopsidini are reconstructed as being Neotropical in origin, read more read less

Topics:

Agroecomyrmecinae (60%)60% related to the paper, Trichomyrmex (60%)60% related to the paper, Pheidole (60%)60% related to the paper, Tetramorium (59%)59% related to the paper, Strumigenys (59%)59% related to the paper
View PDF
252 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1111/J.1365-3113.2010.00558.X
Integrative taxonomy, or iterative taxonomy?
01 Apr 2011 - Systematic Entomology

Abstract:

The recently introduced term ‘integrative taxonomy’ refers to taxonomy that integrates all available data sources to frame species limits. We survey current taxonomic methods available to delimit species that integrate a variety of data, including molecular and morphological characters. A literature review of empirical studie... The recently introduced term ‘integrative taxonomy’ refers to taxonomy that integrates all available data sources to frame species limits. We survey current taxonomic methods available to delimit species that integrate a variety of data, including molecular and morphological characters. A literature review of empirical studies using the term ‘integrative taxonomy’ assessed the kinds of data being used to frame species limits, and methods of integration. Almost all studies are qualitative and comparative – we are a long way from a repeatable, quantitative method of truly ‘integrative taxonomy’. The usual methods for integrating data in phylogenetic and population genetic paradigms are not appropriate for integrative taxonomy, either because of the diverse range of data used or because of the special challenges that arise when working at the species/population boundary. We identify two challenges that, if met, will facilitate the development of a more complete toolkit and a more robust research programme in integrative taxonomy using species tree approaches. We propose the term ‘iterative taxonomy’ for current practice that treats species boundaries as hypotheses to be tested with new evidence. A search for biological or evolutionary explanations for discordant evidence can be used to distinguish between competing species boundary hypotheses. We identify two recent empirical examples that use the process of iterative taxonomy. read more read less

Topics:

Population (54%)54% related to the paper
View PDF
235 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1111/J.1365-3113.2006.00355.X
A mitochondrial genome phylogeny of Diptera: whole genome sequence data accurately resolve relationships over broad timescales with high precision
Stephen L. Cameron1, Christine L. Lambkin2, Stephen C. Barker3, Michael F. Whiting1
01 Jan 2007 - Systematic Entomology

Abstract:

Mitochondrial genomes provide a promising new tool for understanding deep-level insect phylogenetics, but have yet to be evaluated for their ability to resolve intraordinal relationships. We tested the utility of mitochondrial genome data for the resolution of relationships within Diptera, the insect order for which the most ... Mitochondrial genomes provide a promising new tool for understanding deep-level insect phylogenetics, but have yet to be evaluated for their ability to resolve intraordinal relationships. We tested the utility of mitochondrial genome data for the resolution of relationships within Diptera, the insect order for which the most data are available. We sequenced an additional three genomes, from a syrphid, nemestrinid and tabanid, representing three additional dipteran clades, 'aschiza', non-heteroneuran muscomorpha and 'basal brachyceran', respectively. We assessed the influence of optimality criteria, gene inclusion/exclusion, data recoding and partitioning strategies on topology and nodal support within Diptera. Our consensus phylogeny of Diptera was largely consistent with previous phylogenetic hypotheses of the order, except that we did not recover a monophyletic Muscomorpha (Nesmestrinidae grouped with Tabanidae) or Acalyptratae (Drosophilidae grouped with Calliphoridae). The results were very robust to optimality criteria, as parsimony, likelihood and Bayesian approaches yielded very similar topologies, although nodal support varied. The addition of ribosomal and transfer RNA genes to the protein coding genes traditionally used in mitochondrial genome phylogenies improved the resolution and support, contrary to previous suggestions that these genes would evolve too quickly or prove too difficult to align to provide phylogenetic signal at deep nodes. Strategies to recode data, aimed at reducing homoplasy, resulted in a decrease in tree resolution and branch support. Bayesian analyses were highly sensitive to partitioning strategy: biologically realistic partitions into codon groups produced the best results. The implications of this study for dipteran systematics and the effective approaches to using mitochondrial genome data are discussed. Mitochondrial genomes resolve intraordinal relationships within Diptera accurately over very wide time ranges (1-200 million years ago) and genetic distances, suggesting that this may be an excellent data source for deep-level studies within other, less studied, insect orders. read more read less

Topics:

Genome (54%)54% related to the paper, Phylogenetic tree (53%)53% related to the paper, Phylogenetics (52%)52% related to the paper, Molecular phylogenetics (50%)50% related to the paper
221 Citations
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With SciSpace, you do not need a word template for Systematic Entomology.

It automatically formats your research paper to Wiley formatting guidelines and citation style.

You can download a submission ready research paper in pdf, LaTeX and docx formats.

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Time taken to format a paper and Compliance with guidelines

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Systematic Entomology format uses apa citation style.

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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write Systematic Entomology in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Systematic Entomology guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Systematic Entomology guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Systematic Entomology guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Systematic Entomology?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Systematic Entomology citation style.

4. Can I use the Systematic Entomology templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Systematic Entomology.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Systematic Entomology that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Systematic Entomology that you can download at the end.

6. How long does it usually take you to format my papers in Systematic Entomology?

It only takes a matter of seconds to edit your manuscript. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves you from writing and formatting it in Systematic Entomology.

7. Where can I find the template for the Systematic Entomology?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Systematic Entomology's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

8. Can I reformat my paper to fit the Systematic Entomology's guidelines?

Of course! You can do this using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, our support team is always ready to assist you.

9. Systematic Entomology an online tool or is there a desktop version?

SciSpace's Systematic Entomology is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

10. I cannot find my template in your gallery. Can you create it for me like Systematic Entomology?

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it setup within a few days. You can find the request box in Journal Gallery on the right side bar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for like Systematic Entomology?”

11. What is the output that I would get after using Systematic Entomology?

After writing your paper autoformatting in Systematic Entomology, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Systematic Entomology's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Systematic Entomology?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Systematic Entomology. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Systematic Entomology?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Systematic Entomology are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Systematic Entomology?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Systematic Entomology's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

16. Can I download Systematic Entomology in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Systematic Entomology Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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I spent hours with MS word for reformatting. It was frustrating - plain and simple. With SciSpace, I can draft my manuscripts and once it is finished I can just submit. In case, I have to submit to another journal it is really just a button click instead of an afternoon of reformatting.

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