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Institution

Academia Nacional de Medicina

NonprofitBuenos Aires, Argentina
About: Academia Nacional de Medicina is a nonprofit organization based out in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Immune system. The organization has 1297 authors who have published 1653 publications receiving 24329 citations. The organization is also known as: ANM & Academia Nacional de Medicina.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study offers a state-level quantification of disease burden and risk factor attribution in Mexico for the first time and concludes that Mexico is experiencing a more complex, dissonant health transition than historically observed.

620 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2007
TL;DR: In this article, an artigo busca analisar as relacoes entre saude and seus determinantes sociais de saude, apresentando inicialmente o conceito de determinantes Sociais of saude (DSS) and uma breve evolucao history of the processo saude/doenca no âmbito das sociedades, desde meados do seculo XIX.
Abstract: RESUMO Este artigo busca analisar as relacoes entre saude e seus determinantes sociais, apresentando inicialmente o conceito de determinantes sociais de saude (DSS) e uma breve evolucao historica dos diversos paradigmas explicativos do processo saude/doenca no âmbito das sociedades, desde meados do seculo XIX. Em seguida sao discutidos os principais avancos e desafios no estudo dos DSS, com enfase em novos enfoques e marcos de referencia explicativos das relacoes ente os diversos niveis de DSS e a situacao de saude. Com base nesses estudos e marcos explicativos, discutese, em seguida, uma serie de possibilidades de intervencoes de politicas e programas voltados para o combate as iniquidades de saude geradas pelos DSS. Finalmente, sao apresentados os objetivos, linhas de atuacao e principais atividades da Comissao Nacional sobre Determinantes Sociais da Saude, criada em marco de 2006, com o objetivo de promover estudos sobre os DSS, recomendar politicas para a promocao da equidade em saude e mobilizar setores da sociedade para o debate e posicionamento em torno dos DSS e do enfrentamento das iniquidades de saude.

615 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A systematic review of the literature on the global burden of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in low-, middle-, and high-income countries was performed in this article.
Abstract: Background— Thrombosis is the common pathology underlying ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010) documented that ischemic heart disease and stroke collectively caused 1 in 4 deaths worldwide. GBD 2010 did not report data for VTE as a cause of death and disability. Objective— To review the literature on the global burden of disease caused by VTE. Approach and Results— We performed a systematic review of the literature on the global disease burden because of VTE in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Studies from Western Europe, North America, Australia, and Southern Latin America (Argentina) yielded consistent results with annual incidences ranging from 0.75 to 2.69 per 1000 individuals in the population. The incidence increased to between 2 and 7 per 1000 among those aged ≥70 years. Although the incidence is lower in individuals of Chinese and Korean ethnicity, their disease burden is not low because of population aging. VTE associated with hospitalization was the leading cause of disability-adjusted life-years lost in low- and middle-income countries, and second in high-income countries, responsible for more disability-adjusted life-years lost than nosocomial pneumonia, catheter-related blood stream infections, and adverse drug events. Conclusions— VTE causes a major burden of disease across low-, middle-, and high-income countries. More detailed data on the global burden of VTE should be obtained to inform policy and resource allocation in health systems and to evaluate whether improved use of preventive measures will reduce the burden.

575 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
16 Feb 2010-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: The results suggest that MSC switch M into a regulatory profile characterized by a low ability to produce inflammatory cytokines, a high ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells, and a marked increase in their susceptibility to infection by intracellular pathogens.
Abstract: In recent years it has become clear that the therapeutic properties of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are related not only to their ability to differentiate into different lineages but also to their capacity to suppress the immune response. We here studied the influence of MSC on macrophage function. Using mouse thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (M) stimulated with LPS, we found that MSC markedly suppressed the production of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p70 and interferon-γ while increased the production of IL-10 and IL-12p40. Similar results were observed using supernatants from MSC suggesting that factor(s) constitutively released by MSC are involved. Supporting a role for PGE2 we observed that acetylsalicylic acid impaired the ability of MSC to inhibit the production of inflammatory cytokines and to stimulate the production of IL-10 by LPS-stimulated M. Moreover, we found that MSC constitutively produce PGE2 at levels able to inhibit the production of TNF-α and IL-6 by activated M. MSC also inhibited the up-regulation of CD86 and MHC class II in LPS-stimulated M impairing their ability to activate antigen-specific T CD4+ cells. On the other hand, they stimulated the uptake of apoptotic thymocytes by M. Of note, MSC turned M into cells highly susceptible to infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi increasing more than 5-fold the rate of M infection. Using a model of inflammation triggered by s.c. implantation of glass cylinders, we found that MSC stimulated the recruitment of macrophages which showed a low expression of CD86 and the MHC class II molecule Iab and a high ability to produce IL-10 and IL-12p40, but not IL-12 p70. In summary, our results suggest that MSC switch M into a regulatory profile characterized by a low ability to produce inflammatory cytokines, a high ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells, and a marked increase in their susceptibility to infection by intracellular pathogens.

528 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The cost-benefit analysis of investment in the vector control programme in Brazil indicates that there are savings of US$17 in medical care and disabilities for each dollar spent on prevention, showing that the programme is a health investment with very high return.
Abstract: Chagas disease, named after Carlos Chagas, who first described it in 1909, exists only on the American Continent. It is caused by a parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by blood-sucking triatomine bugs and via blood transfusion. Chagas disease has two successive phases: acute and chronic. The acute phase lasts six-eight weeks. Several years after entering the chronic phase, 20-35% of infected individuals, depending on the geographical area, will develop irreversible lesions of the autonomous nervous system in the heart, oesophagus and colon, and of the peripheral nervous system. Data on the prevalence and distribution of Chagas disease improved in quality during the 1980s as a result of the demographically representative cross-sectional studies in countries where accurate information was not previously available. A group of experts met in Brasilia in 1979 and devised standard protocols to carry out countrywide prevalence studies on human T. cruzi infection and triatomine house infestation. Thanks to a coordinated multi-country programme in the Southern Cone countries, the transmission of Chagas disease by vectors and via blood transfusion was interrupted in Uruguay in 1997, in Chile in 1999 and in Brazil in 2006; thus, the incidence of new infections by T. cruzi across the South American continent has decreased by 70%. Similar multi-country initiatives have been launched in the Andean countries and in Central America and rapid progress has been reported towards the goal of interrupting the transmission of Chagas disease, as requested by a 1998 Resolution of the World Health Assembly. The cost-benefit analysis of investment in the vector control programme in Brazil indicates that there are savings of US$17 in medical care and disabilities for each dollar spent on prevention, showing that the programme is a health investment with very high return. Many well-known research institutions in Latin America were key elements of a worldwide network of laboratories that carried out basic and applied research supporting the planning and evaluation of national Chagas disease control programmes. The present article reviews the current epidemiological trends for Chagas disease in Latin America and the future challenges in terms of epidemiology, surveillance and health policy.

459 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20232
20228
202160
202059
201954
201848