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Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education

About: Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education is a based out in . It is known for research contribution in the topics: Accreditation & Continuing medical education. The organization has 7 authors who have published 8 publications receiving 71 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) supports a new and expanded role for the CME provider in physicians' lifelong learning, including periodic self‐assessment and practice performance improvement.
Abstract: Increased accountability for facilitating and demonstrating the continued competence of physicians and improvements in the quality of health care are being called for by government, the public, and organized medicine. Areas of critical skills have been identified by the Institute of Medicine, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and the American Board of Medical Specialties. These "competencies" serve as the framework around which medical school curricula, residency programs, and continuing medical education (CME) can be built. Much discussion revolves around the reform of CME, and the organizations most involved have developed innovative plans and initiatives to ensure that CME is optimally positioned to support physicians in learning and change. The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) supports a new and expanded role for the CME provider in physicians' lifelong learning, including periodic self-assessment and practice performance improvement. CME providers can assist in the determination of need (self-assessment) by the physician, the delivery of education to meet that need, and the evaluation of education used to meet the need, especially as it relates to the practice performance of the physician. The ACCME, working with accredited providers, has embraced these expectations and believes that CME can meet these challenges with an approach that also expects independence from commercial interests and freedom from commercial bias. The CME enterprise is uniquely positioned to deliver effective education for learning and change.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Boards have a critical role in professional self-regulation and should not compromise on their primary responsibility to set and evolve standards for competence and to conduct rigorous assessments of physicians.
Abstract: Background: Traditionally the role of certifying boards has been to hold physicians accountable for demonstrating standards of competence. In recent years, the authority of continuing board certification has been challenged, due to multiple factors that have shifted the dynamics. The breadth and depth of new information, combined with the pressures of system barriers and administrative burdens, can make it challenging for clinicians stay current and maintain their own competency. Absent feedback about their performance, physicians presume they’re practicing effectively. The resulting gap between confidence and competence can also lead physicians to make errors of which they may be unaware. In this environment, assessment and accountability are more important than ever. Four Key Areas: The authors present four key areas to address to move forward with a board certification system that is effective, relevant, and respected. First, boards should set and communicate the specific expectations of specialists. Second, boards should use technology to create practice-relevant assessments. Third, they should collaborate with educators, while maintaining their distinct role as assessors. Fourth, boards need to establish and meet standards for professionalism and ethics that reflect their position as regulatory bodies. Conclusion: Boards have a critical role in professional self-regulation. They should not compromise on their primary responsibility to set and evolve standards for competence and to conduct rigorous assessments of physicians. The methods boards use for assessments should evolve to meet the changing needs of physicians. Collaboration between educators and assessors provides more educational choice, relieves burdens, and supports physicians’ commitment to lifelong learning. By working together with physicians, educators and assessors advance their shared goal of supporting physicians to work at the top of their capability and ultimately, optimize patient care.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors suggest several considerations for improved public member integration into health care regulatory organizations: clearly defined roles of public members, including evaluating whether or not previous health care experience either contributes or hinders their role within the organization; greater visibility of opportunities for the public to serve on these boards; and potentially a more intensive orientation for public members.
Abstract: American medicine has progressively embraced transparency and accountability in professional self-regulation. While public members serving on health care regulatory boards involved with the accreditation, assessment, certification, education, and licensing of physicians provide formal opportunities for voicing public interests, their presence has not been deeply explored. Using 2016 survey and interview data from health care organizations and public members, the authors explore the value and challenges of public members. Public members were often defined as individuals who did not have a background in health care and provided a patient perspective, but in some instances prior health care experience did not automatically exclude these individuals from serving as public members. Public members served on the majority of national health care regulatory boards and constituted an average 9% to 15% of board composition, depending on how rigidly the organizations defined "public member." Public members were valued for their commitment to the priorities and interests of the public, ability to help boards maintain that public focus, and various professional skills they offer to boards. A main challenge that public members faced was their lack of familiarity with and knowledge of the health care field. The authors suggest several considerations for improved public member integration into health care regulatory organizations: clearly defined roles of public members, including evaluating whether or not previous health care experience either contributes or hinders their role within the organization; greater visibility of opportunities for the public to serve on these boards; and potentially a more intensive orientation for public members.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education is the national organization responsible for setting standards as well as directly surveying and accrediting national sponsors of continuing medical education (CME).
Abstract: Introduction The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) is the national organization responsible for setting standards as well as directly surveying and accrediting national sponsors of continuing medical education (CME). The ACCME thus serves a role similar to the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME) for medical schools and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) for residency training programs. The ACCME also recognizes intrastate

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
21 Jul 2021-BMJ
TL;DR: In this article, Fugh-Berman is correct in recognizing the threat to our profession when prescribers are influenced by the marketing efforts of drug and device manufacturers. But the author's conflation of accredited continuing medical education (CME) and industry marketing is misinformed, and she makes several misleading and inaccurate statements.
Abstract: Fugh-Berman is correct in recognising the threat to our profession when prescribers are influenced by the marketing efforts of drug and device manufacturers.1 These companies invest in marketing because it works. But the author’s conflation of accredited continuing medical education (CME) and industry marketing is misinformed, and she makes several misleading and inaccurate statements. The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and the …

2 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20211
20201
20191
20171
20151
20131