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Institution

Agnes Scott College

EducationDecatur, Georgia, United States
About: Agnes Scott College is a education organization based out in Decatur, Georgia, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Star formation. The organization has 290 authors who have published 694 publications receiving 17170 citations. The organization is also known as: ASC & Agnes.


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Journal ArticleDOI
Ward Appeltans1, Shane T. Ahyong2, Shane T. Ahyong3, Gary L. Anderson4, Martin V. Angel5, Tom Artois6, Nicolas Bailly7, Roger N. Bamber, Anthony Barber, Ilse Bartsch8, Annalisa Berta9, Magdalena Błażewicz-Paszkowycz, Phil Bock10, Geoff A. Boxshall11, Christopher B. Boyko12, Simone N. Brandão13, R. A. Bray11, Niel L. Bruce14, Niel L. Bruce15, Stephen D. Cairns16, Tin-Yam Chan17, Lanna Cheng18, Allen Gilbert Collins19, Thomas H. Cribb20, Marco Curini-Galletti21, Farid Dahdouh-Guebas22, Farid Dahdouh-Guebas23, Peter J. F. Davie24, Michael N Dawson25, Olivier De Clerck26, Wim Decock1, Sammy De Grave8, Nicole J. de Voogd27, Daryl P. Domning28, Christian C. Emig, Christer Erséus29, William N. Eschmeyer30, William N. Eschmeyer31, Kristian Fauchald16, Daphne G. Fautin8, Stephen W. Feist32, Charles H. J. M. Fransen27, Hidetaka Furuya33, Óscar García-Álvarez34, Sarah Gerken35, David I. Gibson11, Arjan Gittenberger27, Serge Gofas36, Liza Gómez-Daglio25, Dennis P. Gordon37, Michael D. Guiry38, Francisco Hernandez1, Bert W. Hoeksema27, Russell R. Hopcroft39, Damià Jaume40, Paul M. Kirk41, Nico Koedam23, Stefan Koenemann42, Jürgen B. Kolb43, Reinhardt Møbjerg Kristensen44, Andreas Kroh45, Gretchen Lambert46, David Lazarus47, Rafael Lemaitre16, Matt Longshaw32, Jim Lowry2, Enrique Macpherson40, Laurence P. Madin48, Christopher L. Mah16, Gill Mapstone11, Patsy A. McLaughlin49, Jan Mees26, Jan Mees1, Kenneth Meland50, Charles G. Messing51, Claudia E. Mills46, Tina N. Molodtsova52, Rich Mooi30, Birger Neuhaus47, Peter K. L. Ng53, Claus Nielsen44, Jon L. Norenburg16, Dennis M. Opresko16, Masayuki Osawa54, Gustav Paulay31, William F. Perrin19, John F. Pilger55, Gary C. B. Poore10, P.R. Pugh5, Geoffrey B. Read37, James Davis Reimer56, Marc Rius57, Rosana M. Rocha58, J.I. Saiz-Salinas59, Victor Scarabino, Bernd Schierwater60, Andreas Schmidt-Rhaesa13, Kareen E. Schnabel37, Marilyn Schotte16, Peter Schuchert, Enrico Schwabe, Hendrik Segers61, Caryn Self-Sullivan51, Noa Shenkar62, Volker Siegel, Wolfgang Sterrer8, Sabine Stöhr63, Billie J. Swalla46, Mark L. Tasker64, Erik V. Thuesen65, Tarmo Timm66, M. Antonio Todaro, Xavier Turon40, Seth Tyler67, Peter Uetz68, Jacob van der Land27, Bart Vanhoorne1, Leen van Ofwegen27, Rob W. M. Van Soest27, Jan Vanaverbeke26, Genefor Walker-Smith10, T. Chad Walter16, Alan Warren11, Gary C. Williams30, Simon P. Wilson69, Mark J. Costello70 
Flanders Marine Institute1, Australian Museum2, University of New South Wales3, University of Southern Mississippi4, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton5, University of Hasselt6, WorldFish7, American Museum of Natural History8, San Diego State University9, Museum Victoria10, Natural History Museum11, Dowling College12, University of Hamburg13, University of Johannesburg14, James Cook University15, National Museum of Natural History16, National Taiwan Ocean University17, Scripps Institution of Oceanography18, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration19, University of Queensland20, University of Sassari21, Université libre de Bruxelles22, Vrije Universiteit Brussel23, Queensland Museum24, University of California, Merced25, Ghent University26, Naturalis27, Howard University28, University of Gothenburg29, California Academy of Sciences30, Florida Museum of Natural History31, Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science32, Osaka University33, University of Santiago de Compostela34, University of Alaska Anchorage35, University of Málaga36, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research37, National University of Ireland, Galway38, University of Alaska Fairbanks39, Spanish National Research Council40, CABI41, University of Siegen42, Massey University43, University of Copenhagen44, Naturhistorisches Museum45, University of Washington46, Museum für Naturkunde47, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution48, Western Washington University49, University of Bergen50, Nova Southeastern University51, Shirshov Institute of Oceanology52, National University of Singapore53, Shimane University54, Agnes Scott College55, University of the Ryukyus56, University of California, Davis57, Federal University of Paraná58, University of the Basque Country59, University of Veterinary Medicine Hanover60, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences61, Tel Aviv University62, Swedish Museum of Natural History63, Joint Nature Conservation Committee64, The Evergreen State College65, Estonian University of Life Sciences66, University of Maine67, Virginia Commonwealth University68, Trinity College, Dublin69, University of Auckland70
TL;DR: The first register of the marine species of the world is compiled and it is estimated that between one-third and two-thirds of marine species may be undescribed, and previous estimates of there being well over one million marine species appear highly unlikely.

822 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Social exchange theory is one of the most prominent conceptual perspectives in management, as well as related fields like sociology and social psychology as discussed by the authors, however, it lacks sufficient theoretical precision, and thus has limited utility.
Abstract: Social exchange theory is one of the most prominent conceptual perspectives in management, as well as related fields like sociology and social psychology. An important criticism of social exchange theory; however, is that it lacks sufficient theoretical precision, and thus has limited utility. Scholars who apply social exchange theory are able to explain many social phenomena in post hoc manner but are severely limited in their ability to make useful a priori predictions regarding workplace behavior. In this review, we discuss social exchange theory as it exists today and identify four critical issues within the social exchange paradigm that warrant additional consideration. The four concerns, around which we center this review, include the following: (1) overlapping constructs that need to be more clearly distinguished; (2) insufficient appreciation to the positive or negative hedonic value of these various constructs; (3) an assumption of bipolarity, which treats negative constructs (e.g., abuse) as the absence of positive constructs (e.g., support); and, following from the prior three issues, (4) theoretically imprecise behavioral predictions. Given that these problems are inherent in the current unidimensional framework for social exchange theory, we suggest an additional dimension–activity. We explain how conceptualizing social exchange within a two-dimensional space, while giving equal consideration to both hedonic value and activity, creates new opportunities for future research.

758 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an 8-month campaign of monitoring NGC 5548 with IUE is described, with the goal of determining the size and structure of the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei.
Abstract: This is an electronic version of an article published in The Astrophysical Journal. Clavel, J. et al. Steps toward determination of the size and structure of the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei. I. An 8 month campaign of monitoring NGC 5548 with IUE. The Astrophysical Journal 366 (1991): 64-81

396 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 May 2009-Science
TL;DR: A two-color irradiation scheme whereby initiating species aregenerated by single-photon absorption at one wavelength while inhibiting species are generated by single, independent wavelength thus reduces the polymerization rate, delaying gelation of the material and facilitating enhanced spatial control over the polymerized region.
Abstract: Controlling and reducing the developed region initiated by photoexposure is one of the fundamental goals of optical lithography. Here, we demonstrate a two-color irradiation scheme whereby initiating species are generated by single-photon absorption at one wavelength while inhibiting species are generated by single-photon absorption at a second, independent wavelength. Co-irradiation at the second wavelength thus reduces the polymerization rate, delaying gelation of the material and facilitating enhanced spatial control over the polymerization. Appropriate overlapping of the two beams produces structures with both feature sizes and monomer conversions otherwise unobtainable with use of single- or two-photon absorption photopolymerization. Additionally, the generated inhibiting species rapidly recombine when irradiation with the second wavelength ceases, allowing for fast sequential exposures not limited by memory effects in the material and thus enabling fabrication of complex two- or three-dimensional structures.

390 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that hollow microneedles can be used for precise microinjection into skin, especially when a single needle is inserted by rotary drilling and then retracted part way before infusion or a micronedle array is Inserted by mechanical vibration.

295 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20232
20227
202128
202032
201932
201834