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Institution

Alderson Broaddus University

EducationPhilippi, West Virginia, United States
About: Alderson Broaddus University is a education organization based out in Philippi, West Virginia, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Ovarian cancer & Apoptosis. The organization has 95 authors who have published 117 publications receiving 4433 citations. The organization is also known as: Alderson-Broaddus College & Alderson–Broaddus University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The aim of this review is to synthesize information concerning the extraction of kaempferol, as well as to provide insights into the molecular basis of its potential chemo-preventative activities, with an emphasis on its ability to control intracellular signaling cascades that regulate the aforementioned processes.

682 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper reviews the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena, and examines the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation.
Abstract: Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

474 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: 10 important aspects of tumor angiogenesis and the pathological tumor vasculature which would be well suited as targets for anti-angiogenic therapy are identified and 10 plant-derived compounds could be combined to constitute a broader acting and more effective inhibitory cocktail at doses that would not be likely to cause excessive toxicity.

387 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Keith I. Block, Charlotte Gyllenhaal, Leroy Lowe1, Amedeo Amedei2  +180 moreInstitutions (105)
TL;DR: An international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity "broad-spectrum" therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms, and results suggest that a broad-spectrums approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint.

228 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Six flavonoids, including apigenin, taxifolin, luteolin, quercetin, genistein, and kaempferol, were shown to inhibit the ovarian cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and naringin showed the least inhibition effect.
Abstract: Dietary flavonoids have been shown to be protective against various types of cancers. Here we studied the effects of 12 different flavonoids and other substances on cell proliferation and VEGF expression in human ovarian cancer cells, OVCAR-3. Cell growth was determined to pinpoint the best time for drug treatment. By LDH assay, no cytotoxicity was observed for OVCAR-3 cells with all 12 chemicals except mevinolin. Six flavonoids, including apigenin, taxifolin, luteolin, quercetin, genistein, and kaempferol, were shown to inhibit the ovarian cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. From both RT-qPCR and ELISA results, all flavonoids have shown varied degrees of inhibition in VEGF expression. Taxifolin and naringin showed the least inhibition effect. They both lack a double bond in the second ring structure that may be important in inhibiting VEGF expression. The rank order of VEGF protein secretion inhibitory potency was genistein > kaempferol > apigenin > quercetin > tocopherol > luteolin > cisplatin > rutin > naringin > taxifolin. Genistein, quercetin, and luteolin have shown strong inhibition to cell proliferation and VEGF expression of human ovarian cancer cells, and they show promising in the prevention of ovarian cancers.

211 citations


Authors

Showing all 95 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Jianchu Chen31733347
Yi Charlie Chen23522752
Aaron E. Maxwell16341139
Carl M. Way1533632
Bo Li1431706
Ying Gao1322507
Marjorie Darrah1351675
Yu Zhang1227385
I.A. Wojciechowski1131358
Haitao Luo1013828
Valerie Minor810338
Frank H. Hooper712272
Ning Ren69112
C. Ken Shannon6679
Matthew K. Daddysman620339
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20221
20215
20206
201911
201811
20176