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Institution

Bose Corporation

CompanyFramingham, Massachusetts, United States
About: Bose Corporation is a company organization based out in Framingham, Massachusetts, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Signal & Audio signal. The organization has 2895 authors who have published 3852 publications receiving 52503 citations. The organization is also known as: Bose Corp. & Bose.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the state-of-the-art in responsive polymer systems for controlled drug delivery applications is given in this article, where the authors describe different types of stimuli-sensitive systems and give an account of their synthesis through methods such as group transfer polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerisation.

1,186 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Rigorous analysis of the existing data shows that the Indian railway network displays small-world properties and several other quantities associated with this network are defined and estimated.
Abstract: Structural properties of the Indian railway network is studied in the light of recent investigations of the scaling properties of different complex networks. Stations are considered as "nodes" and an arbitrary pair of stations is said to be connected by a "link" when at least one train stops at both stations. Rigorous analysis of the existing data shows that the Indian railway network displays small-world properties. We define and estimate several other quantities associated with this network.

547 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Among different Pb-remediation approaches, certain advanced approaches such as microbial assisted phytoremediation which could possibly minimize the Pb load from the resources in a sustainable manner and would be a viable option to ensure a safe food production system are highlighted.
Abstract: Lead (Pb) toxicity has been a subject of interest for environmental scientists due to its toxic effect on plants, animals, and humans. An increase in several Pb related industrial activities and use of Pb containing products such as agrochemicals, oil and paint, mining, etc. can lead to Pb contamination in the environment and thereby, can enter the food chain. Being one of the most toxic heavy metals, Pb ingestion via the food chain has proven to be a potential health hazard for plants and humans. The current review aims to summarize the research updates on Pb toxicity and its effects on plants, soil, and human health. Relevant literature from the past 20 years encompassing comprehensive details on Pb toxicity has been considered with key issues such as i) Pb bioavailability in soil, ii) Pb biomagnification, and iii) Pb- remediation, which has been addressed in detail through physical, chemical, and biological lenses. In the review, among different Pb-remediation approaches, we have highlighted certain advanced approaches such as microbial assisted phytoremediation which could possibly minimize the Pb load from the resources in a sustainable manner and would be a viable option to ensure a safe food production system.

351 citations

Patent
23 Dec 2004
TL;DR: In this article, a method is described comprising based on user preference information about digital works, selecting available digital works to be included in at least two different sequences of digital work to be performed, the different sequences being based on different aspects of the preference information.
Abstract: A method is described comprising based on user preference information about digital works, selecting available digital works to be included in at least two different sequences of digital works to be performed, the different sequences being based on different aspects of the preference information, and enabling the different sequences to be performed at the same time by a performance system.

329 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evidence is added that long-term ingestion of inorganic arsenic can cause respiratory effects by participants with arsenic-induced skin lesions who also had high levels of arsenic in their current drinking water source compared with individuals who had normal skin and were exposed to low levels.
Abstract: Background A large population in West Bengal, India has been exposed to naturally occurring inorganic arsenic through their drinking water. A cross-sectional survey involving 7683 participants of all ages was conducted in an arsenic-affected region between April 1995 and March 1996. The main focus of the study was skin keratoses and pigmentation alterations, two characteristic signs of ingested inorganic arsenic. Strong exposure-response gradients were found for these skin lesions. The study also collected limited information concerning respiratory system signs and symptoms, which we report here because increasing evidence suggests that arsenic ingestion also causes pulmonary effects. Methods Participants were clinically examined and interviewed, and the arsenic content in their current primary drinking water source was measured. There were few smokers and analyses were confined to non-smokers (N = 6864 participants). Results Among both males and females, the prevalence of cough, shortness of breath, and chest sounds (crepitations and/or rhonchi) in the lungs rose with increasing arsenic concentrations in drinking water. These respiratory effects were most pronounced in individuals with high arsenic water concentrations who also had skin lesions. Prevalence odds ratio (POR) estimates were markedly increased for participants with arsenic-induced skin lesions who also had high levels of arsenic in their current drinking water source (>500 μg/l) compared with individuals who had normal skin and were exposed to low levels of arsenic (,50 μg/l). In participants with skin lesions, the age-adjusted POR estimates for cough were 7.8 for females (95% CI : 3.1‐19.5) and 5.0 for males (95% CI : 2.6‐9.9); for chest sounds POR for females was 9.6 (95% CI : 4.0‐22.9) and for males 6.9 (95% CI : 3.1‐15.0). The POR for shortness of breath in females was 23.2 (95% CI : 5.8‐92.8) and in males 3.7 (95% CI : 1.3‐10.6). Conclusion These results add to evidence that long-term ingestion of inorganic arsenic can cause respiratory effects.

315 citations


Authors

Showing all 2896 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Manish Sharma82140733361
Santanu Bhattacharya6740014039
Robert Booy6137214584
Roland Boese5894018606
Iacopo Carusotto5734615924
Ganapati D. Yadav5543911666
Peter M. Oppeneer5341611892
Samir Kumar Pal5235610901
Bruce Y. Lee522999845
Sandip K. Chakrabarti5047710411
A. K. Raychaudhuri493688948
Aditya P Dash4623213410
Tarek M. Habashy452987059
Samit K. Ray445078085
Rabin Banerjee442397042
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20229
2021468
2020456
2019253
2018152
2017154