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British Orthopaedic Association

NonprofitLondon, United Kingdom
About: British Orthopaedic Association is a(n) nonprofit organization based out in London, United Kingdom. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Hip fracture & Labour law. The organization has 276 authors who have published 23 publication(s) receiving 823 citation(s). The organization is also known as: BOA.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There should be protocol‐driven, fast‐track admission of patients with hip fractures through the emergency department, according to a report published in JAMA Oncology 2.1.
Abstract: There should be protocol-driven, fast-track admission of patients with hip fractures through the emergency department. Patients with hip fractures require multidisciplinary care, led by orthogeriatricians. Surgery is the best analgesic for hip fractures. Surgical repair of hip fractures should occur within 48 hours of hospital admission. Surgery and anaesthesia must be undertaken by appropriately experienced surgeons and anaesthetists. There must be high-quality communication between clinicians and allied health professionals. Early mobilisation is a key part of the management of patients with hip fractures. Pre-operative management should include consideration of planning for discharge from hospital. Measures should be taken to prevent secondary falls. 10. Continuous audit and targeted research is required in order to inform and improve the management of patients with hip fracture.

214 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The history of the genesis of the Putti-Platt operation for habitual dislocation of the shoulder is outlined and the operation is described and briefly commented upon.
Abstract: 1. The history of the genesis of the Putti-Platt operation for habitual dislocation of the shoulder is outlined so far as it is known. 2. The operation is described and briefly commented upon. 3. Since there is both gleno-labrial detachment and defect in the humeral head successful treatment depends upon: i) a block to the exit of the humeral head in front and ii) limitation of external rotation movement.

130 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Three mechanical factors which might be responsible for this very early clinical union are examined and a theory is suggested that high compression forces stimulate early union by liberating bone salts at points of maximum pressure through the action of osteoclasts.
Abstract: 1. The technique of compression-arthrodesis of the knee joint is described. 2. Fifteen consecutive cases are reported in which clinical union was detected at the first inspection from twelve days to six weeks after operation. By this method the total period of disability is reduced to three months. 3. Three mechanical factors which might be responsible for this very early clinical union are examined: compression is believed to be the main factor, although fixation is also important. 4. A fallacy is exposed in the use of bone grafts for arthrodesis of the knee; the graft is less osteogenic than the substance of the bones which form the joint, and it provides inefficient internal fixation. 5. A theory is suggested that compression, even in the presence of slight movement, acts by producing a fixed "hinge" without shearing movement; at this point a bridgehead of flexible osteoid tissue is established in which ossification inevitably takes place despite slight bending movement. 6. A second theory is suggested that high compression forces stimulate early union by liberating bone salts at points of maximum pressure through the action of osteoclasts, and that the local excess of bone salts is redeposited under cellular activity within a range of a few millimetres where there is no pressure.

114 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the treatment of recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint the Nicola operation is unreliable, and it may be associated with a recurrence rate as high as 36 per cent, but it is believed that continued instability after this operation is usually due to the presence of a defect of the humeral head.
Abstract: A review of the pathology, mechanism, and operative treatment of recurrent dislocation of the shoulder, based on an analysis of 180 cases, with 159 operations, is presented. From this analysis the following conclusions have been made and appear to be substantiated: 1. The pathology comprises two important elements: ( a ) anterior detachment of the glenoid labrum from the bone margin of the glenoid, associated with some degree of stripping of the anterior part of the capsule from the front of the neck of the scapula, found in 87 per cent. of cases examined adequately at operation; ( b ) defect or flattening of the posterolateral aspect of the articular surface of the head of the humerus which engages with the glenoid cavity when the arm is in external rotation and abduction; this defect is demonstrated most readily in antero-posterior radiographs taken with the humerus in 60 to 70 degrees of internal rotation and was shown to be present in 82 per cent. of cases which had been subjected to adequate radiographic examination. 2. The frequency of the humeral head defect has been under-estimated in the past, because of the difficulty of demonstrating it, particularly when the defect is small. 3. Either type of lesion alone may predispose to recurrence of the dislocation. 4. Both types of lesion are often present in the same shoulder. When this is the case the tendency to redislocation is great. 5. The initial dislocation, which results in the development of one or both these persistent structural abnormalities, may be due to very different types of injury, the commonest of which is a fall on the outstretched hand. The factor common to all these injuries is a resultant force acting on the humeral head in the direction of the anterior glenoid margin. 6. In the treatment of recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint the Nicola operation is unreliable, and it may be associated with a recurrence rate as high as 36 per cent. It is believed that continued instability after this operation is usually due to the presence of a defect of the humeral head. 7. Operative treatment should aim at repairing, or nullifying, the effects of both types of lesion. For anterior detachment of the labrum this involves either suturing the labrum back to the glenoid margin, or constructing some form of anterior buttress, fibrous or bony: for humeral head defects it necessitates some procedure designed to limit external rotation, thus preventing the defect from coming into engagement with the glenoid cavity. Such limitation of external rotation does not constitute a significant disability.

76 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Concise guidelines are presented for the preparation and conduct of anaesthesia and surgery in patients undergoing cemented hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture.
Abstract: Concise guidelines are presented for the preparation and conduct of anaesthesia and surgery in patients undergoing cemented hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture. The Working Party specifically considered recent publications highlighting complications occurring during the peri-operative period. The advice presented is based on previously published advice and clinical studies.

66 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20212
20202
20191
20181
20171
20162