scispace - formally typeset

Institution

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

NonprofitCold Spring Harbor, New York, United States
About: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is a(n) nonprofit organization based out in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Gene & Genome. The organization has 3772 authors who have published 6603 publication(s) receiving 1010873 citation(s). The organization is also known as: CSHL.
Topics: Gene, Genome, RNA, RNA splicing, Population


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
Eric S. Lander1, Lauren Linton1, Bruce W. Birren1, Chad Nusbaum1  +245 moreInstitutions (29)
15 Feb 2001-Nature
TL;DR: The results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome are reported and an initial analysis is presented, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.
Abstract: The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

21,023 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Spliced Transcripts Alignment to a Reference (STAR) software based on a previously undescribed RNA-seq alignment algorithm that uses sequential maximum mappable seed search in uncompressed suffix arrays followed by seed clustering and stitching procedure outperforms other aligners by a factor of >50 in mapping speed.
Abstract: Motivation Accurate alignment of high-throughput RNA-seq data is a challenging and yet unsolved problem because of the non-contiguous transcript structure, relatively short read lengths and constantly increasing throughput of the sequencing technologies. Currently available RNA-seq aligners suffer from high mapping error rates, low mapping speed, read length limitation and mapping biases. Results To align our large (>80 billon reads) ENCODE Transcriptome RNA-seq dataset, we developed the Spliced Transcripts Alignment to a Reference (STAR) software based on a previously undescribed RNA-seq alignment algorithm that uses sequential maximum mappable seed search in uncompressed suffix arrays followed by seed clustering and stitching procedure. STAR outperforms other aligners by a factor of >50 in mapping speed, aligning to the human genome 550 million 2 × 76 bp paired-end reads per hour on a modest 12-core server, while at the same time improving alignment sensitivity and precision. In addition to unbiased de novo detection of canonical junctions, STAR can discover non-canonical splices and chimeric (fusion) transcripts, and is also capable of mapping full-length RNA sequences. Using Roche 454 sequencing of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplicons, we experimentally validated 1960 novel intergenic splice junctions with an 80-90% success rate, corroborating the high precision of the STAR mapping strategy. Availability and implementation STAR is implemented as a standalone C++ code. STAR is free open source software distributed under GPLv3 license and can be downloaded from http://code.google.com/p/rna-star/.

20,172 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Competition with both transforming and non-transforming plasmids indicates that each cell is capable of taking up many DNA molecules, and that the establishment of a transformation event is neither helped nor hindered significantly by the presence of multiple plasmid molecules.
Abstract: Factors that affect the probability of genetic transformation of Escherichia coli by plasmids have been evaluated. A set of conditions is described under which about one in every 400 plasmid molecules produces a transformed cell. These conditions include cell growth in medium containing elevated levels of Mg2+, and incubation of the cells at 0 degrees C in a solution of Mn2+, Ca2+, Rb+ or K+, dimethyl sulfoxide, dithiothreitol, and hexamine cobalt (III). Transformation efficiency declines linearly with increasing plasmid size. Relaxed and supercoiled plasmids transform with similar probabilities. Non-transforming DNAs compete consistent with mass. No significant variation is observed between competing DNAs of different source, complexity, length or form. Competition with both transforming and non-transforming plasmids indicates that each cell is capable of taking up many DNA molecules, and that the establishment of a transformation event is neither helped nor hindered significantly by the presence of multiple plasmids.

10,867 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Adam Auton1, Gonçalo R. Abecasis2, David Altshuler3, Richard Durbin4  +514 moreInstitutions (90)
01 Oct 2015-Nature
TL;DR: The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations, and has reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals from 26 populations using a combination of low-coverage whole-generation sequencing, deep exome sequencing, and dense microarray genotyping.
Abstract: The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals from 26 populations using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome sequencing, deep exome sequencing, and dense microarray genotyping. We characterized a broad spectrum of genetic variation, in total over 88 million variants (84.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 3.6 million short insertions/deletions (indels), and 60,000 structural variants), all phased onto high-quality haplotypes. This resource includes >99% of SNP variants with a frequency of >1% for a variety of ancestries. We describe the distribution of genetic variation across the global sample, and discuss the implications for common disease studies.

9,821 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The topic of this report is rap,d m,croscale methods for,solat,on of plant D N A without tile use of ul tracentr ,fugatlon wEth CsCI, which is of moderately high molecular weight and serves as a satisfactory substrate for most restrlctum cndonucleases and is statable for genom,c blot analys,s.
Abstract: The topic of this report is rap,d m,croscale methods for ,solat,on of plant D N A without tile use of ul tracentr ,fugatlon wEth CsCI. The D N A produced ,s of moderately high molecular weight and serves as a satisfactory substrate for most restrlctum cndonucleases and is statable for genom,c blot analys,s. In addi t ion to the rapidi ty and convenience of mlmpreps which permit a large number of samples to be processed in just a few hours, the small amount of tissue reqmred (less than 1.0 grams) allows tbr molecular analysis of plants at a very young stage Mm,prep D N A y,elds from leaf tissue of most species tested to date are typ,cally 30-100 big per gram tissue, greater than 50 kb, and remarkably uniform from sample to sample. The first mmlprep procedure we reported fi3r maize D N A isolation (Dellaporta et al , ;'*l,;tze Geneta3 Cr162162 Neu'_~letlrt. 1983) was adapted from a procedure commonly used for }'east D N A preparatmn (Dav,s et al. , 1980) Since th,s report, numerous personal commun,cat ,ons have demonstrated that the mm,prep procedure or a modification thereof, can be apphed to most plant species tested. For example, the method has been successfully used on Ntcottana hlgl~um. N. plumklgmgidtum. N. 3)/t'eJtrt~. L)s~opertcum sp.. Amar,mthm sp . Gl)~me max. Petuma h.~hra&. Several modifications have been apphed by these ,nvestlgators and in our own laboratory m order to extend the appl ,catmn of ram,prep procedures to other plant species. The select,on of a part icular protocol depends to a large degree on the plant spec,es used. However, the procedure reported here was selected to be statable for most situations.

7,012 citations


Authors

Showing all 3772 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Phillip A. Sharp172614117126
Gregory J. Hannon165421140456
Ian A. Wilson15897198221
Marco A. Marra153620184684
Michael E. Greenberg148316114317
Tom Maniatis143318299495
Detlef Weigel14251684670
Kim Nasmyth14229459231
Arnold J. Levine139485116005
Joseph E. LeDoux13947891500
Gerald R. Fink13831670868
Ramnik J. Xavier138597101879
Harold E. Varmus13749676320
David A. Jackson136109568352
Scott W. Lowe13439689376
Network Information
Related Institutions (5)
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

34.6K papers, 5.2M citations

99% related

Salk Institute for Biological Studies

13.1K papers, 1.6M citations

98% related

European Bioinformatics Institute

10.5K papers, 999.6K citations

96% related

Laboratory of Molecular Biology

24.2K papers, 2.1M citations

96% related

Broad Institute

11.6K papers, 1.5M citations

95% related

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
2021291
2020350
2019315
2018288
2017238
2016236