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Institution

Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology

About: Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology is a based out in . It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Foraging. The organization has 280 authors who have published 510 publications receiving 39351 citations. The organization is also known as: Edward Grey Institute.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1978-Nature
TL;DR: Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic as discussed by the authors, Vol. 1: Ostrich to Ducks.
Abstract: Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic. Vol. 1: Ostrich to Ducks. Edited By S. Cramp, K. E. L. Simmons, I. J. Ferguson-Lees, E. M. Nicholson, M. A. Ogilvie, P. J. S. Olney, K. H. Voous and J. Wattel. Pp. 722. (Oxford University: Oxford, London and New York, 1977.) £25.

4,126 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
03 Apr 2008-Ibis

1,818 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Aug 1999-Nature
TL;DR: The drive to squeeze ever more food from the land has sent Europe's farmland wildlife into a precipitous decline as discussed by the authors, and how can agricultural policy be reformed so that we have fewer grain mountains and more skylarks?
Abstract: The drive to squeeze ever more food from the land has sent Europe's farmland wildlife into a precipitous decline. How can agricultural policy be reformed so that we have fewer grain mountains and more skylarks?

818 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The under‐exploited potential of experimental manipulations on social networks to address research questions is highlighted, and an overview of methods for quantifying properties of nodes and networks, as well as for testing hypotheses concerning network structure and network processes are provided.
Abstract: Summary Animal social networks are descriptions of social structure which, aside from their intrinsic interest for understanding sociality, can have significant bearing across many fields of biology. Network analysis provides a flexible toolbox for testing a broad range of hypotheses, and for describing the social system of species or populations in a quantitative and comparable manner. However, it requires careful consideration of underlying assumptions, in particular differentiating real from observed networks and controlling for inherent biases that are common in social data. We provide a practical guide for using this framework to analyse animal social systems and test hypotheses. First, we discuss key considerations when defining nodes and edges, and when designing methods for collecting data. We discuss different approaches for inferring social networks from these data and displaying them. We then provide an overview of methods for quantifying properties of nodes and networks, as well as for testing hypotheses concerning network structure and network processes. Finally, we provide information about assessing the power and accuracy of an observed network. Alongside this manuscript, we provide appendices containing background information on common programming routines and worked examples of how to perform network analysis using the r programming language. We conclude by discussing some of the major current challenges in social network analysis and interesting future directions. In particular, we highlight the under-exploited potential of experimental manipulations on social networks to address research questions.

648 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1978-Nature
TL;DR: When great tits forage in an unknown environment containing two feeding places of different profitability, they first sample the two places and then exploit the more profitable one.
Abstract: When great tits forage in an unknown environment containing two feeding places of different profitability, they first sample the two places and then exploit the more profitable one. The balance between sampling and exploitation shown by the birds is close to an optimal solution for maximising the number of food-items obtained during a feeding period.

606 citations


Authors

Showing all 280 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
William J. Sutherland14896694423
Ben C. Sheldon9230828661
Matthew J.A. Wood8436931560
Daniel M. Weary8343722349
John L. Quinn7845020877
Innes C. Cuthill7626433034
John R. Krebs7316824843
Ruth Mace5819710212
Jean-Guy J. Godin561188531
Patricia A. Nuttall5522010268
Simon Verhulst5518911894
Alex Kacelnik541389364
Malcolm L. Hunter5315111832
Simon C. Griffith5123310130
Ian Newton5013818171
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20215
20205
201913
201812
20178
20168