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Institution

Federal University of Paraná

EducationCuritiba, Paraná, Brazil
About: Federal University of Paraná is a education organization based out in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Species richness. The organization has 27655 authors who have published 46603 publications receiving 546515 citations. The organization is also known as: UFPR & Federal University of Paraná.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Clotilde Théry1, Kenneth W. Witwer2, Elena Aikawa3, María José Alcaraz4  +414 moreInstitutions (209)
TL;DR: The MISEV2018 guidelines include tables and outlines of suggested protocols and steps to follow to document specific EV-associated functional activities, and a checklist is provided with summaries of key points.
Abstract: The last decade has seen a sharp increase in the number of scientific publications describing physiological and pathological functions of extracellular vesicles (EVs), a collective term covering various subtypes of cell-released, membranous structures, called exosomes, microvesicles, microparticles, ectosomes, oncosomes, apoptotic bodies, and many other names. However, specific issues arise when working with these entities, whose size and amount often make them difficult to obtain as relatively pure preparations, and to characterize properly. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) proposed Minimal Information for Studies of Extracellular Vesicles (“MISEV”) guidelines for the field in 2014. We now update these “MISEV2014” guidelines based on evolution of the collective knowledge in the last four years. An important point to consider is that ascribing a specific function to EVs in general, or to subtypes of EVs, requires reporting of specific information beyond mere description of function in a crude, potentially contaminated, and heterogeneous preparation. For example, claims that exosomes are endowed with exquisite and specific activities remain difficult to support experimentally, given our still limited knowledge of their specific molecular machineries of biogenesis and release, as compared with other biophysically similar EVs. The MISEV2018 guidelines include tables and outlines of suggested protocols and steps to follow to document specific EV-associated functional activities. Finally, a checklist is provided with summaries of key points.

5,988 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a broad view of health behaviour causation, with the social and physical environment included as contributors to physical inactivity, particularly those outside the health sector, such as urban planning, transportation systems, and parks and trails, is presented.

3,063 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
A. Gordon Robertson1, Jaegil Kim2, Hikmat Al-Ahmadie3, Joaquim Bellmunt4  +167 moreInstitutions (16)
19 Oct 2017-Cell
TL;DR: An analysis of 412 muscle-invasive bladder cancers characterized by multiple TCGA analytical platforms identified 5 expression subtypes that may stratify response to different treatments and identified a poor-survival "neuronal" subtype in which the majority of tumors lacked small cell or neuroendocrine histology.

1,638 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Nilotinib at a dose of either 300 mg or 400 mg twice daily was superior to imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML, and no patient with progression to the accelerated phase or blast crisis had a major molecular response.
Abstract: Background Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase. Methods In this phase 3, randomized, open-label, multicenter study, we assigned 846 patients with chronic-phase Philadelphia chromosome–positive CML in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive nilotinib (at a dose of either 300 mg or 400 mg twice daily) or imatinib (at a dose of 400 mg once daily). The primary end point was the rate of major molecular response at 12 months. Results At 12 months, the rates of major molecular response for nilotinib (44% for the 300-mg dose and 43% for the 400-mg dose) were nearly twice that for imatinib (22%) (P<0.001 for both comparisons). The rates of complete cytogenetic response by 12 months were significantly higher for nilotinib (80% for the 300-mg dose and 78% for the 400-mg dose) than for imatinib (65%) (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Patients receiving either the 300-mg dose or the 400-mg dose of nilotinib twice daily had a significant improvement in the time to progression to the accelerated phase or blast crisis, as compared with those receiving imatinib (P = 0.01 and P = 0.004, respectively). No patient with progression to the accelerated phase or blast crisis had a major molecular response. Gastrointestinal and fluid-retention events were more frequent among patients receiving imatinib, whereas dermatologic events and headache were more frequent in those receiving nilotinib. Discontinuations due to aminotransferase and bilirubin elevations were low in all three study groups. Conclusions Nilotinib at a dose of either 300 mg or 400 mg twice daily was superior to imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase Philadelphia chromosome–positive CML. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00471497.)

1,486 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Oct 1999-Nature
TL;DR: It is shown that, when the target sites are sparse and can be visited any number of times, an inverse square power-law distribution of flight lengths, corresponding to Lévy flight motion, is an optimal strategy.
Abstract: We address the general question of what is the best statistical strategy to adapt in order to search efficiently for randomly located objects ('target sites'). It is often assumed in foraging theory that the flight lengths of a forager have a characteristic scale: from this assumption gaussian, Rayleigh and other classical distributions with well-defined variances have arisen. However, such theories cannot explain the long-tailed power-law distributions of flight lengths or flight times that are observed experimentally. Here we study how the search efficiency depends on the probability distribution of flight lengths taken by a forager that can detect target sites only in its limited vicinity. We show that, when the target sites are sparse and can be visited any number of times, an inverse square power-law distribution of flight lengths, corresponding to Levy flight motion, is an optimal strategy. We test the theory by analysing experimental foraging data on selected insect, mammal and bird species, and find that they are consistent with the predicted inverse square power-law distributions.

1,416 citations


Authors

Showing all 27872 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Josemir W. Sander10668039038
Ashok Pandey9679643038
Jacques F. Meis9267035594
Patrick J. Kelly9144926459
John M. Opitz85119340257
Richard L. Maas7417720667
Domenic V. Cicchetti7121129155
Staffan Nilsson7145417165
Lena M. S. Carlsson7032627322
G.S. de Hoog7033917690
Carlos Ricardo Soccol7054422933
Manuel Fernando R. Pereira6831017979
Eduardo Bonilla6817716439
Marcelo Bahia Labruna6868020115
Mariangela Hungria6738915219
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202367
2022356
20213,600
20203,838
20193,303
20183,199