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Harvard University

EducationCambridge, Massachusetts, United States
About: Harvard University is a(n) education organization based out in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Population & Cancer. The organization has 208150 authors who have published 530388 publication(s) receiving 38152182 citation(s). The organization is also known as: Harvard & University of Harvard.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results show that the polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis method can be used with great confidence to determine the molecular weights of polypeptide chains for a wide variety of proteins.
Abstract: Forty proteins with polypeptide chains of well characterized molecular weights have been studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate following the procedure of Shapiro, Vinuela, and Maizel (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 28, 815 (1967)). When the electrophoretic mobilities were plotted against the logarithm of the known polypeptide chain molecular weights, a smooth curve was obtained. The results show that the method can be used with great confidence to determine the molecular weights of polypeptide chains for a wide variety of proteins.

19,356 citations


Journal Article
Abstract: First, the span of absolute judgment and the span of immediate memory impose severe limitations on the amount of information that we are able to receive, process, and remember. By organizing the stimulus input simultaneously into several dimensions and successively into a sequence or chunks, we manage to break (or at least stretch) this informational bottleneck. Second, the process of recoding is a very important one in human psychology and deserves much more explicit attention than it has received. In particular, the kind of linguistic recoding that people do seems to me to be the very lifeblood of the thought processes. Recoding procedures are a constant concern to clinicians, social psychologists, linguists, and anthropologists and yet, probably because recoding is less accessible to experimental manipulation than nonsense syllables or T mazes, the traditional experimental psychologist has contributed little or nothing to their analysis. Nevertheless, experimental techniques can be used, methods of recoding can be specified, behavioral indicants can be found. And I anticipate that we will find a very orderly set of relations describing what now seems an uncharted wilderness of individual differences. Third, the concepts and measures provided by the theory of information provide a quantitative way of getting at some of these questions. The theory provides us with a yardstick for calibrating our stimulus materials and for measuring the performance of our subjects. In the interests of communication I have suppressed the technical details of information measurement and have tried to express the ideas in more familiar terms; I hope this paraphrase will not lead you to think they are not useful in research. Informational concepts have already proved valuable in the study of discrimination and of language; they promise a great deal in the study of learning and memory; and it has even been proposed that they can be useful in the study of concept formation. A lot of questions that seemed fruitless twenty or thirty years ago may now be worth another look. In fact, I feel that my story here must stop just as it begins to get really interesting. And finally, what about the magical number seven? What about the seven wonders of the world, the seven seas, the seven deadly sins, the seven daughters of Atlas in the Pleiades, the seven ages of man, the seven levels of hell, the seven primary colors, the seven notes of the musical scale, and the seven days of the week? What about the seven-point rating scale, the seven categories for absolute judgment, the seven objects in the span of attention, and the seven digits in the span of immediate memory? For the present I propose to withhold judgment. Perhaps there is something deep and profound behind all these sevens, something just calling out for us to discover it. But I suspect that it is only a pernicious, Pythagorean coincidence.

19,039 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The revised criteria for the classification of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were formulated from a computerized analysis of 262 contemporary, consecutively studied patients with RA and 262 control subjects with rheumatic diseases other than RA (non-RA).
Abstract: The revised criteria for the classification of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were formulated from a computerized analysis of 262 contemporary, consecutively studied patients with RA and 262 control subjects with rheumatic diseases other than RA (non-RA). The new criteria are as follows: 1) morning stiffness in and around joints lasting at least 1 hour before maximal improvement; 2) soft tissue swelling (arthritis) of 3 or more joint areas observed by a physician; 3) swelling (arthritis) of the proximal interphalangeal, metacarpophalangeal, or wrist joints; 4) symmetric swelling (arthritis); 5) rheumatoid nodules; 6) the presence of rheumatoid factor; and 7) radiographic erosions and/or periarticular osteopenia in hand and/or wrist joints. Criteria 1 through 4 must have been present for at least 6 weeks. Rheumatoid arthritis is defined by the presence of 4 or more criteria, and no further qualifications (classic, definite, or probable) or list of exclusions are required. In addition, a "classification tree" schema is presented which performs equally as well as the traditional (4 of 7) format. The new criteria demonstrated 91-94% sensitivity and 89% specificity for RA when compared with non-RA rheumatic disease control subjects.

18,828 citations


Journal ArticleDOI

17,827 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
15 Apr 1990-Physical Review B
TL;DR: Novel features are that the pseudopotential itself becomes charge-state dependent, the usual norm-conservation constraint does not apply, and a generalized eigenproblem is introduced.
Abstract: A new approach to the construction of first-principles pseudopotentials is described. The method allows transferability to be improved systematically while holding the cutoff radius fixed, even for large cutoff radii. Novel features are that the pseudopotential itself becomes charge-state dependent, the usual norm-conservation constraint does not apply, and a generalized eigenproblem is introduced. The potentials have a separable form well suited for plane-wave solid-state calculations, and show promise for application to first-row and transition-metal systems.

17,261 citations


Authors

Showing all 208150 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Walter C. Willett3342399413322
Eric S. Lander301826525976
Robert Langer2812324326306
Meir J. Stampfer2771414283776
Ronald C. Kessler2741332328983
JoAnn E. Manson2701819258509
Albert Hofman2672530321405
Graham A. Colditz2611542256034
Frank B. Hu2501675253464
Bert Vogelstein247757332094
George M. Whitesides2401739269833
Paul M. Ridker2331242245097
Richard A. Flavell2311328205119
Eugene Braunwald2301711264576
Ralph B. D'Agostino2261287229636
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
2022294
202130,491
202029,817
201926,010
201823,929
201725,232

Top Attributes

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Institution's top 5 most impactful journals

Social Science Research Network

12.1K papers, 756.9K citations

The Astrophysical Journal

8.8K papers, 828.9K citations

bioRxiv

5.7K papers, 38.9K citations

Nature

4.9K papers, 1.7M citations