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Institution

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

EducationHong Kong, Hong Kong, China
About: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology is a education organization based out in Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & MIMO. The organization has 20126 authors who have published 52428 publications receiving 1965915 citations. The organization is also known as: HKUST & The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The relationship between transfer learning and other related machine learning techniques such as domain adaptation, multitask learning and sample selection bias, as well as covariate shift are discussed.
Abstract: A major assumption in many machine learning and data mining algorithms is that the training and future data must be in the same feature space and have the same distribution. However, in many real-world applications, this assumption may not hold. For example, we sometimes have a classification task in one domain of interest, but we only have sufficient training data in another domain of interest, where the latter data may be in a different feature space or follow a different data distribution. In such cases, knowledge transfer, if done successfully, would greatly improve the performance of learning by avoiding much expensive data-labeling efforts. In recent years, transfer learning has emerged as a new learning framework to address this problem. This survey focuses on categorizing and reviewing the current progress on transfer learning for classification, regression, and clustering problems. In this survey, we discuss the relationship between transfer learning and other related machine learning techniques such as domain adaptation, multitask learning and sample selection bias, as well as covariate shift. We also explore some potential future issues in transfer learning research.

18,616 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The asynchronous pipeline scheme provides other substantial advantages, including high flexibility, favorable processing speeds, choice of both all-in-memory and disk-bound processing, easy adaptation to different data formats, simpler software development and maintenance, and the ability to distribute processing tasks on multi-CPU computers and computer networks.
Abstract: The NMRPipe system is a UNIX software environment of processing, graphics, and analysis tools designed to meet current routine and research-oriented multidimensional processing requirements, and to anticipate and accommodate future demands and developments. The system is based on UNIX pipes, which allow programs running simultaneously to exchange streams of data under user control. In an NMRPipe processing scheme, a stream of spectral data flows through a pipeline of processing programs, each of which performs one component of the overall scheme, such as Fourier transformation or linear prediction. Complete multidimensional processing schemes are constructed as simple UNIX shell scripts. The processing modules themselves maintain and exploit accurate records of data sizes, detection modes, and calibration information in all dimensions, so that schemes can be constructed without the need to explicitly define or anticipate data sizes or storage details of real and imaginary channels during processing. The asynchronous pipeline scheme provides other substantial advantages, including high flexibility, favorable processing speeds, choice of both all-in-memory and disk-bound processing, easy adaptation to different data formats, simpler software development and maintenance, and the ability to distribute processing tasks on multi-CPU computers and computer networks.

13,804 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a literature review of the use of sorbents and biosorbents to treat polluted aqueous effluents containing dyes:organics or metal ions has been conducted.

13,746 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors extended the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) to study acceptance of technology in a consumer context and proposed UTAUT2 incorporating three constructs into UTAAUT: hedonic motivation, price value, and habit.
Abstract: This paper extends the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) to study acceptance and use of technology in a consumer context. Our proposed UTAUT2 incorporates three constructs into UTAUT: hedonic motivation, price value, and habit. Individual differences--namely, age, gender, and experience--are hypothesized to moderate the effects of these constructs on behavioral intention and technology use. Results from a two-stage online survey, with technology use data collected four months after the first survey, of 1,512 mobile Internet consumers supported our model. Compared to UTAUT, the extensions proposed in UTAUT2 produced a substantial improvement in the variance explained in behavioral intention (56 percent to 74 percent) and technology use (40 percent to 52 percent). The theoretical and managerial implications of these results are discussed.

6,744 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John W. Belmont1, Paul Hardenbol, Thomas D. Willis, Fuli Yu1, Huanming Yang2, Lan Yang Ch'Ang, Wei Huang3, Bin Liu2, Yan Shen3, Paul K.H. Tam4, Lap-Chee Tsui4, Mary M.Y. Waye5, Jeffrey Tze Fei Wong6, Changqing Zeng2, Qingrun Zhang2, Mark S. Chee7, Luana Galver7, Semyon Kruglyak7, Sarah S. Murray7, Arnold Oliphant7, Alexandre Montpetit8, Fanny Chagnon8, Vincent Ferretti8, Martin Leboeuf8, Michael S. Phillips8, Andrei Verner8, Shenghui Duan9, Denise L. Lind10, Raymond D. Miller9, John P. Rice9, Nancy L. Saccone9, Patricia Taillon-Miller9, Ming Xiao10, Akihiro Sekine, Koki Sorimachi, Yoichi Tanaka, Tatsuhiko Tsunoda, Eiji Yoshino, David R. Bentley11, Sarah E. Hunt11, Don Powell11, Houcan Zhang12, Ichiro Matsuda13, Yoshimitsu Fukushima14, Darryl Macer15, Eiko Suda15, Charles N. Rotimi16, Clement Adebamowo17, Toyin Aniagwu17, Patricia A. Marshall18, Olayemi Matthew17, Chibuzor Nkwodimmah17, Charmaine D.M. Royal16, Mark Leppert19, Missy Dixon19, Fiona Cunningham20, Ardavan Kanani20, Gudmundur A. Thorisson20, Peter E. Chen21, David J. Cutler21, Carl S. Kashuk21, Peter Donnelly22, Jonathan Marchini22, Gilean McVean22, Simon Myers22, Lon R. Cardon22, Andrew P. Morris22, Bruce S. Weir23, James C. Mullikin24, Michael Feolo24, Mark J. Daly25, Renzong Qiu26, Alastair Kent, Georgia M. Dunston16, Kazuto Kato27, Norio Niikawa28, Jessica Watkin29, Richard A. Gibbs1, Erica Sodergren1, George M. Weinstock1, Richard K. Wilson9, Lucinda Fulton9, Jane Rogers11, Bruce W. Birren25, Hua Han2, Hongguang Wang, Martin Godbout30, John C. Wallenburg8, Paul L'Archevêque, Guy Bellemare, Kazuo Todani, Takashi Fujita, Satoshi Tanaka, Arthur L. Holden, Francis S. Collins24, Lisa D. Brooks24, Jean E. McEwen24, Mark S. Guyer24, Elke Jordan31, Jane Peterson24, Jack Spiegel24, Lawrence M. Sung32, Lynn F. Zacharia24, Karen Kennedy29, Michael Dunn29, Richard Seabrook29, Mark Shillito, Barbara Skene29, John Stewart29, David Valle21, Ellen Wright Clayton33, Lynn B. Jorde19, Aravinda Chakravarti21, Mildred K. Cho34, Troy Duster35, Troy Duster36, Morris W. Foster37, Maria Jasperse38, Bartha Maria Knoppers39, Pui-Yan Kwok10, Julio Licinio40, Jeffrey C. Long41, Pilar N. Ossorio42, Vivian Ota Wang33, Charles N. Rotimi16, Patricia Spallone43, Patricia Spallone29, Sharon F. Terry44, Eric S. Lander25, Eric H. Lai45, Deborah A. Nickerson46, Gonçalo R. Abecasis41, David Altshuler47, Michael Boehnke41, Panos Deloukas11, Julie A. Douglas41, Stacey Gabriel25, Richard R. Hudson48, Thomas J. Hudson8, Leonid Kruglyak49, Yusuke Nakamura50, Robert L. Nussbaum24, Stephen F. Schaffner25, Stephen T. Sherry24, Lincoln Stein20, Toshihiro Tanaka 
18 Dec 2003-Nature
TL;DR: The HapMap will allow the discovery of sequence variants that affect common disease, will facilitate development of diagnostic tools, and will enhance the ability to choose targets for therapeutic intervention.
Abstract: The goal of the International HapMap Project is to determine the common patterns of DNA sequence variation in the human genome and to make this information freely available in the public domain. An international consortium is developing a map of these patterns across the genome by determining the genotypes of one million or more sequence variants, their frequencies and the degree of association between them, in DNA samples from populations with ancestry from parts of Africa, Asia and Europe. The HapMap will allow the discovery of sequence variants that affect common disease, will facilitate development of diagnostic tools, and will enhance our ability to choose targets for therapeutic intervention.

5,926 citations


Authors

Showing all 20461 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Ruedi Aebersold182879141881
John R. Yates1771036129029
John Hardy1771178171694
Lei Jiang1702244135205
Gang Chen1673372149819
Roger Y. Tsien163441138267
Xiang Zhang1541733117576
Rui Zhang1512625107917
Ben Zhong Tang1492007116294
Michael E. Greenberg148316114317
Yi Yang143245692268
Shi-Zhang Qiao14252380888
Shuit-Tong Lee138112177112
David H. Pashley13774063657
Steven G. Louie13777788794
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20242
2023141
2022677
20213,818
20203,688
20193,412