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Institution

Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology

FacilityMagdeburg, Germany
About: Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology is a facility organization based out in Magdeburg, Germany. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Thin film. The organization has 10334 authors who have published 15143 publications receiving 436655 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work reviews recent advances and challenges in the developments towards applications of stimuli-responsive polymeric materials that are self-assembled from nanostructured building blocks and provides a critical outline of emerging developments.
Abstract: Responsive polymer materials can adapt to surrounding environments, regulate transport of ions and molecules, change wettability and adhesion of different species on external stimuli, or convert chemical and biochemical signals into optical, electrical, thermal and mechanical signals, and vice versa. These materials are playing an increasingly important part in a diverse range of applications, such as drug delivery, diagnostics, tissue engineering and 'smart' optical systems, as well as biosensors, microelectromechanical systems, coatings and textiles. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments towards applications of stimuli-responsive polymeric materials that are self-assembled from nanostructured building blocks. We also provide a critical outline of emerging developments.

4,908 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an overview of the atmospheric degradation mechanisms for SOA precursors, gas-particle partitioning theory and analytical techniques used to determine the chemical composition of SOA is presented.
Abstract: Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a significant fraction of ambient tropospheric aerosol and a detailed knowledge of the formation, properties and transformation of SOA is therefore required to evaluate its impact on atmospheric processes, climate and human health. The chemical and physical processes associated with SOA formation are complex and varied, and, despite considerable progress in recent years, a quantitative and predictive understanding of SOA formation does not exist and therefore represents a major research challenge in atmospheric science. This review begins with an update on the current state of knowledge on the global SOA budget and is followed by an overview of the atmospheric degradation mechanisms for SOA precursors, gas-particle partitioning theory and the analytical techniques used to determine the chemical composition of SOA. A survey of recent laboratory, field and modeling studies is also presented. The following topical and emerging issues are highlighted and discussed in detail: molecular characterization of biogenic SOA constituents, condensed phase reactions and oligomerization, the interaction of atmospheric organic components with sulfuric acid, the chemical and photochemical processing of organics in the atmospheric aqueous phase, aerosol formation from real plant emissions, interaction of atmospheric organic components with water, thermodynamics and mixtures in atmospheric models. Finally, the major challenges ahead in laboratory, field and modeling studies of SOA are discussed and recommendations for future research directions are proposed.

3,324 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Aug 1998-Genetics
TL;DR: The isolation of microsatellite-containing clones from hypomethylated regions of the wheat genome increased the proportion of useful markers almost twofold and the development of highly polymorphic micros Satellite markers using procedures optimized for the large wheat genome is reported.
Abstract: Hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell) is one of the world's most important crop plants and displays a very low level of intraspecific polymorphism. We report the development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers using procedures optimized for the large wheat genome. The isolation of microsatellite-containing clones from hypomethylated regions of the wheat genome increased the proportion of useful markers almost twofold. The majority (80%) of primer sets developed are genome-specific and detect only a single locus in one of the three genomes of bread wheat (A, B, or D). Only 20% of the markers detect more than one locus. A total of 279 loci amplified by 230 primer sets were placed onto a genetic framework map composed of RFLPs previously mapped in the reference population of the International Triticeae Mapping Initiative (ITMI) Opata 85 x W7984. Sixty-five microsatellites were mapped at a LOD >2.5, and 214 microsatellites were assigned to the most likely intervals. Ninety-three loci were mapped to the A genome, 115 to the B genome, and 71 to the D genome. The markers are randomly distributed along the linkage map, with clustering in several centromeric regions.

2,494 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: SDSS-III as mentioned in this paper is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars.
Abstract: Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS DR8 (which occurred in Jan 2011). This paper presents an overview of the four SDSS-III surveys. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Lya forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the BAO feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51-1.70 micron) spectra of 10^5 evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for ~15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. MARVELS will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m/s, ~24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. (Abridged)

2,265 citations


Authors

Showing all 10340 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Richard E. Smalley153494111117
Markku Kulmala142148785179
Helmut Sies13367078319
Mark Stitt13245660800
Matthias Beller11373346344
Matthias Steinmetz11246167802
Steven A. Hillyard11224454946
Michael A. Nitsche10544653636
Horst Weller10545144273
Wolf B. Frommer10534530918
Andreas Radbruch10448536872
Sabu Thomas102155451366
Rajeev K. Varshney10270939796
Thomas J. Jentsch10123832810
Oliver G. Schmidt100108339988
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202236
20211,211
20201,250
20191,117
2018854
2017949