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London Bridge Hospital

HealthcareLondon, United Kingdom
About: London Bridge Hospital is a(n) healthcare organization based out in London, United Kingdom. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Antiphospholipid syndrome & Systemic lupus erythematosus. The organization has 107 authors who have published 122 publication(s) receiving 4523 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Specific evaluation, treatment guidelines, and algorithms were developed for every sexual dysfunction in men, including erectile dysfunction; disorders of libido, orgasm, and ejaculation; Peyronie's disease; and priapism.
Abstract: Introduction. Sexual health is an integral part of overall health. Sexual dysfunction can have a major impact on quality of life and psychosocial and emotional well-being. Aim. To provide evidence-based, expert-opinion consensus guidelines for clinical management of sexual dysfunction in men. Methods. An international consultation collaborating with major urologic and sexual medicine societies convened in Paris, July 2009. More than 190 multidisciplinary experts from 33 countries were assembled into 25 consultation committees. Committee members established scope and objectives for each chapter. Following an exhaustive review of available data and publications, committees developed evidence-based guidelines in each area. Main Outcome Measures. New algorithms and guidelines for assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunctions were developed based on work of previous consultations and evidence from scientific literature published from 2003 to 2009. The Oxford system of evidence-based review was systematically applied. Expert opinion was based on systematic grading of medical literature, and cultural and ethical considerations. Results. Algorithms, recommendations, and guidelines for sexual dysfunction in men are presented. These guidelines were developed in an evidence-based, patient-centered, multidisciplinary manner. It was felt that all sexual dysfunctions should be evaluated and managed following a uniform strategy, thus the International Consultation of Sexual Medicine (ICSM-5) developed a stepwise diagnostic and treatment algorithm for sexual dysfunction. The main goal of ICSM-5 is to unmask the underlying etiology and/or indicate appropriate treatment options according to men's and women's individual needs (patient-centered medicine) using the best available data from population-based research (evidence-based medicine). Specific evaluation, treatment guidelines, and algorithms were developed for every sexual dysfunction in men, including erectile dysfunction; disorders of libido, orgasm, and ejaculation; Peyronie's disease; and priapism. Conclusions. Sexual dysfunction in men represents a group of common medical conditions that need to be managed from a multidisciplinary perspective.

950 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
16 Jun 2016
TL;DR: The 10-year mortality has improved and toxic adverse effects of older medications such as cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids have been partially offset by newer drugs such as mycophenolate mofetil and glucose-sparing regimes.
Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect many organs, including the skin, joints, the central nervous system and the kidneys. Women of childbearing age and certain racial groups are typically predisposed to developing the condition. Rare, inherited, single-gene complement deficiencies are strongly associated with SLE, but the disease is inherited in a polygenic manner in most patients. Genetic interactions with environmental factors, particularly UV light exposure, Epstein-Barr virus infection and hormonal factors, might initiate the disease, resulting in immune dysregulation at the level of cytokines, T cells, B cells and macrophages. Diagnosis is primarily clinical and remains challenging because of the heterogeneity of SLE. Classification criteria have aided clinical trials, but, despite this, only one drug (that is, belimumab) has been approved for use in SLE in the past 60 years. The 10-year mortality has improved and toxic adverse effects of older medications such as cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids have been partially offset by newer drugs such as mycophenolate mofetil and glucocorticoid-sparing regimes. However, further improvements have been hampered by the adverse effects of renal and neuropsychiatric involvement and late diagnosis. Adding to this burden is the increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease in SLE together with the risk of infection made worse by immunosuppressive therapy. Challenges remain with treatment-resistant disease and symptoms such as fatigue. Newer therapies may bring hope of better outcomes, and the refinement to stem cell and genetic techniques might offer a cure in the future.

473 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review focuses on the multidirectional impact of low testosterone associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome and its effects on erectile dysfunction and CVD risk in men with type 2 diabetes.
Abstract: Men with obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes have low total and free testosterone and low sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG). Conversely, the presence of low testosterone and/or SHBG predicts the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Visceral adiposity present in men with low testosterone, the metabolic syndrome, and/or type 2 diabetes acts through proinflammatory factors. These inflammatory markers contribute to vascular endothelial dysfunction with adverse sequelae such as increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and erectile dysfunction. This review focuses on the multidirectional impact of low testosterone associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome and its effects on erectile dysfunction and CVD risk in men with type 2 diabetes. Whenever possible in this review, we will cite recent reports (after 2005) and meta-analyses. ### Epidemiological studies of low testosterone, obesity, metabolic status, and erectile dysfunction Epidemiological studies support a bidirectional relationship between serum testosterone and obesity as well as between testosterone and the metabolic syndrome. Low serum total testosterone predicts the development of central obesity and accumulation of intra-abdominal fat (1–3). Also, low total and free testosterone and SHBG levels are associated with an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, independent of age and obesity (1–3). Lowering serum T levels in older men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy increases body fat mass (4). Conversely, high BMI, central adiposity, and the metabolic syndrome are associated with and predict low serum total and to a lesser extent free testosterone and SHBG levels (1–3,5). Because obesity suppresses SHBG and as a result total testosterone concentrations, alterations in SHBG confound the relationship between testosterone and obesity. Low total testosterone or SHBG levels are associated with type 2 diabetes, independent of age, race, obesity, and criteria for diagnosis of diabetes (6,7). In longitudinal studies, low serum total and free testosterone …

278 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The ultrasound index for detecting gaseous microemboli (MEI) indicated the presence of suchmicroemboli in 22 of the 27 patients during insertion of the aortic cannula during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, supporting the assumption that the MEI is providing quantitative information regarding the existence of gaseously emboli in the middle cerebral artery.
Abstract: Twenty-seven patients were examined who were undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery with either a bubble oxygenator or a capillary membrane oxygenator. The latter incorporated an arterial filter and bubble trap. A noninvasive Doppler ultrasound technique is described for monitoring irregularities in the Doppler flow signals attributable to gaseous microemboli detected in the middle cerebral artery during CPB. The ultrasound index for detecting gaseous microemboli (MEI) indicated the presence of such microemboli in 22 of the 27 patients during insertion of the aortic cannula. Measurements during CPB showed the MEI ranged from 4 to 39 in the 17 patients with a bubble oxygenator. However, all 10 patients with a membrane oxygenator had an MEI of 0. Varying the gas flow rates in 3 patients with bubble oxygenators showed a change in MEI from 4 +/- 4 (SD) at a flow rate of 2 L/min to 17 +/- 9 at a flow rate of 5 L/min. This observation supports the assumption that the MEI is providing quantitative information regarding the presence of gaseous emboli in the middle cerebral artery.

266 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Clinical evidence supports the use of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors as first‐line therapy in men with CAD and comorbid ED and those with diabetes and ED (Level 1, Grade A).
Abstract: * A significant proportion of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) exhibit early signs of coronary artery disease (CAD), and this group may develop more severe CAD than men without ED (Level 1, Grade A). * The time interval among the onset of ED symptoms and the occurrence of CAD symptoms and cardiovascular events is estimated at 2-3 years and 3-5 years respectively; this interval allows for risk factor reduction (Level 2, Grade B). * ED is associated with increased all-cause mortality primarily due to increased cardiovascular mortality (Level 1, Grade A). * All men with ED should undergo a thorough medical assessment, including testosterone, fasting lipids, fasting glucose and blood pressure measurement. Following assessment, patients should be stratified according to the risk of future cardiovascular events. Those at high risk of cardiovascular disease should be evaluated by stress testing with selective use of computed tomography (CT) or coronary angiography (Level 1, Grade A). * Improvement in cardiovascular risk factors such as weight loss and increased physical activity has been reported to improve erectile function (Level 1, Grade A). * In men with ED, hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia should be treated aggressively, bearing in mind the potential side effects (Level 1, Grade A). * Management of ED is secondary to stabilising cardiovascular function, and controlling cardiovascular symptoms and exercise tolerance should be established prior to initiation of ED therapy (Level 1, Grade A). * Clinical evidence supports the use of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors as first-line therapy in men with CAD and comorbid ED and those with diabetes and ED (Level 1, Grade A). * Total testosterone and selectively free testosterone levels should be measured in all men with ED in accordance with contemporary guidelines and particularly in those who fail to respond to PDE5 inhibitors or have a chronic illness associated with low testosterone (Level 1, Grade A). * Testosterone replacement therapy may lead to symptomatic improvement (improved wellbeing) and enhance the effectiveness of PDE5 inhibitors (Level 1, Grade A). * Review of cardiovascular status and response to ED therapy should be performed at regular intervals (Level 1, Grade A).

205 citations


Authors

Showing all 107 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Graham R. V. Hughes7323925987
Graham Jackson6542616880
Michael Chapman5636511439
Richard J. Schilling5432111232
Jonathan Hill5325913899
John L. Hayward4616617691
Sujal R. Desai411338174
Simon Sporton311223473
Mark J. Earley311163364
Bryn T. Williams291693349
Gabriella Pichert28544169
Rick Popert241021791
Adnan Al-Kaisy20491512
Henry Dushan Atkinson19601074
J. Ponte1629936
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20215
20206
20193
20189
201710
20168