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Institution

London South Bank University

EducationLondon, Southwark, United Kingdom
About: London South Bank University is a education organization based out in London, Southwark, United Kingdom. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Health care. The organization has 2785 authors who have published 6642 publications receiving 151765 citations. The organization is also known as: Brixton School of Building & Borough Polytechnic Institute.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) as discussed by the authors provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution.

5,668 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results provide evidence that antihypertensive treatment with indapamide (sustained release), with or without perindopril, in persons 80 years of age or older is beneficial.
Abstract: A b s t r ac t Background Whether the treatment of patients with hypertension who are 80 years of age or older is beneficial is unclear. It has been suggested that antihypertensive therapy may reduce the risk of stroke, despite possibly increasing the risk of death. Methods We randomly assigned 3845 patients from Europe, China, Australasia, and Tunisia who were 80 years of age or older and had a sustained systolic blood pressure of 160 mm Hg or more to receive either the diuretic indapamide (sustained release, 1.5 mg) or matching placebo. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor perindopril (2 or 4 mg), or matching placebo, was added if necessary to achieve the target blood pressure of 150/80 mm Hg. The primary end point was fatal or nonfatal stroke. Results The active-treatment group (1933 patients) and the placebo group (1912 patients) were well matched (mean age, 83.6 years; mean blood pressure while sitting, 173.0/90.8 mm Hg); 11.8% had a history of cardiovascular disease. Median follow-up was 1.8 years. At 2 years, the mean blood pressure while sitting was 15.0/6.1 mm Hg lower in the active-treatment group than in the placebo group. In an intention-to- treat analysis, active treatment was associated with a 30% reduction in the rate of fatal or nonfatal stroke (95% confidence interval (CI), −1 to 51; P = 0.06), a 39% reduc- tion in the rate of death from stroke (95% CI, 1 to 62; P = 0.05), a 21% reduction in the rate of death from any cause (95% CI, 4 to 35; P = 0.02), a 23% reduction in the rate of death from cardiovascular causes (95% CI, −1 to 40; P = 0.06), and a 64% re- duction in the rate of heart failure (95% CI, 42 to 78; P<0.001). Fewer serious adverse events were reported in the active-treatment group (358, vs. 448 in the placebo group; P = 0.001). Conclusions The results provide evidence that antihypertensive treatment with indapamide (sus- tained release), with or without perindopril, in persons 80 years of age or older is beneficial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00122811.)

2,723 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the main problems associated with the machining of titanium as well as tool wear and the mechanisms responsible for tool failure are discussed. But no equivalent development has been made for cutting titanium alloys due primarily to their peculiar characteristics.

1,417 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Plant-derived phenolics represents good sources of natural antioxidants, however, further investigation on the molecular mechanism of action of these phytochemicals is crucial to the evaluation of their potential as prophylactic agents.
Abstract: Accumulating chemical, biochemical, clinical and epidemiological evidence supports the chemoprotective effects of phenolic antioxidants against oxidative stress-mediated disorders. The pharmacological actions of phenolic antioxidants stem mainly from their free radical scavenging and metal chelating properties as well as their effects on cell signaling pathways and on gene expression. The antioxidant capacities of phenolic compounds that are widely distributed in plant-based diets were assessed by the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), the hypochlorite scavenging capacity, the deoxyribose method and the copper-phenanthroline-dependent DNA oxidation assays. Based on the TEAC, FRAP and hypochlorite scavenging data, the observed activity order was: procyanidin dimer>flavanol>flavonol>hydroxycinnamic acids>simple phenolic acids. Among the flavonol aglycones, the antioxidant propensities decrease in the order quercetin, myricetin and kaempferol. Gallic acid and rosmarinic acid were the most potent antioxidants among the simple phenolic and hydroxycinnamic acids, respectively. Ferulic acid displayed the highest inhibitory activity against deoxyribose degradation but no structure-activity relationship could be established for the activities of the phenolic compounds in the deoxyribose assay. The efficacies of the phenolic compounds differ depending on the mechanism of antioxidant action in the respective assay used, with procyanidin dimers and flavan-3-ols showing very potent activities in most of the systems tested. Compared to the physiologically active (glutathione, alpha-tocopherol, ergothioneine) and synthetic (Trolox, BHA, BHT) antioxidants, these compounds exhibited much higher efficacy. Plant-derived phenolics represents good sources of natural antioxidants, however, further investigation on the molecular mechanism of action of these phytochemicals is crucial to the evaluation of their potential as prophylactic agents.

1,293 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Electron microscopy showed that chitosan caused extensive cell surface alterations and covered the OM with vesicular structures, explaining the loss of the barrier function of the outer membrane, which makes chitOSan a potentially useful indirect antimicrobial for food protection.

1,173 citations


Authors

Showing all 2832 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Robert W. Snow11748948427
Peter Franks9253536485
László Á. Gergely8942660674
Vincent Walsh8432326664
Scott Reeves8244127470
Eric Taylor8227826789
Alan Cowey8129020309
John H. Dunning7923245301
Astrid E. Fletcher7926531994
John Strang7665122873
Okezie I. Aruoma7313624693
Vaughan J. Carr7031323493
Stanton Newman6937418354
Gene Feder6839020079
Chris Brewster6535613944
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202318
202275
2021508
2020448
2019399
2018338