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Institution

National Sun Yat-sen University

EducationKaohsiung City, Taiwan
About: National Sun Yat-sen University is a education organization based out in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Microstrip antenna & Antenna (radio). The organization has 17315 authors who have published 24733 publications receiving 472868 citations. The organization is also known as: NSYSU.


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Journal ArticleDOI
Daniel J. Klionsky1, Kotb Abdelmohsen2, Akihisa Abe3, Joynal Abedin4  +2519 moreInstitutions (695)
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macro-autophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes.
Abstract: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. For example, a key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process versus those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process including the amount and rate of cargo sequestered and degraded). In particular, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation must be differentiated from stimuli that increase autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. It is worth emphasizing here that lysosomal digestion is a stage of autophagy and evaluating its competence is a crucial part of the evaluation of autophagic flux, or complete autophagy. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. Along these lines, because of the potential for pleiotropic effects due to blocking autophagy through genetic manipulation, it is imperative to target by gene knockout or RNA interference more than one autophagy-related protein. In addition, some individual Atg proteins, or groups of proteins, are involved in other cellular pathways implying that not all Atg proteins can be used as a specific marker for an autophagic process. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.

5,187 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Kazunori Akiyama, Antxon Alberdi1, Walter Alef2, Keiichi Asada3  +403 moreInstitutions (82)
TL;DR: In this article, the Event Horizon Telescope was used to reconstruct event-horizon-scale images of the supermassive black hole candidate in the center of the giant elliptical galaxy M87.
Abstract: When surrounded by a transparent emission region, black holes are expected to reveal a dark shadow caused by gravitational light bending and photon capture at the event horizon. To image and study this phenomenon, we have assembled the Event Horizon Telescope, a global very long baseline interferometry array observing at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. This allows us to reconstruct event-horizon-scale images of the supermassive black hole candidate in the center of the giant elliptical galaxy M87. We have resolved the central compact radio source as an asymmetric bright emission ring with a diameter of 42 +/- 3 mu as, which is circular and encompasses a central depression in brightness with a flux ratio greater than or similar to 10: 1. The emission ring is recovered using different calibration and imaging schemes, with its diameter and width remaining stable over four different observations carried out in different days. Overall, the observed image is consistent with expectations for the shadow of a Kerr black hole as predicted by general relativity. The asymmetry in brightness in the ring can be explained in terms of relativistic beaming of the emission from a plasma rotating close to the speed of light around a black hole. We compare our images to an extensive library of ray-traced general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of black holes and derive a central mass of M = (6.5 +/- 0.7) x 10(9) M-circle dot. Our radio-wave observations thus provide powerful evidence for the presence of supermassive black holes in centers of galaxies and as the central engines of active galactic nuclei. They also present a new tool to explore gravity in its most extreme limit and on a mass scale that was so far not accessible.

2,589 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Mingxun Wang1, Jeremy Carver1, Vanessa V. Phelan2, Laura M. Sanchez2, Neha Garg2, Yao Peng1, Don D. Nguyen1, Jeramie D. Watrous2, Clifford A. Kapono1, Tal Luzzatto-Knaan2, Carla Porto2, Amina Bouslimani2, Alexey V. Melnik2, Michael J. Meehan2, Wei-Ting Liu3, Max Crüsemann4, Paul D. Boudreau4, Eduardo Esquenazi, Mario Sandoval-Calderón5, Roland D. Kersten6, Laura A. Pace2, Robert A. Quinn7, Katherine R. Duncan8, Cheng-Chih Hsu1, Dimitrios J. Floros1, Ronnie G. Gavilan, Karin Kleigrewe4, Trent R. Northen9, Rachel J. Dutton10, Delphine Parrot11, Erin E. Carlson12, Bertrand Aigle13, Charlotte Frydenlund Michelsen14, Lars Jelsbak14, Christian Sohlenkamp5, Pavel A. Pevzner1, Anna Edlund15, Anna Edlund16, Jeffrey S. McLean17, Jeffrey S. McLean15, Jörn Piel18, Brian T. Murphy19, Lena Gerwick4, Chih-Chuang Liaw20, Yu-Liang Yang21, Hans-Ulrich Humpf22, Maria Maansson14, Robert A. Keyzers23, Amy C. Sims24, Andrew R. Johnson25, Ashley M. Sidebottom25, Brian E. Sedio26, Andreas Klitgaard14, Charles B. Larson2, Charles B. Larson4, Cristopher A. Boya P., Daniel Torres-Mendoza, David Gonzalez2, Denise Brentan Silva27, Denise Brentan Silva28, Lucas Miranda Marques28, Daniel P. Demarque28, Egle Pociute, Ellis C. O’Neill4, Enora Briand11, Enora Briand4, Eric J. N. Helfrich18, Eve A. Granatosky29, Evgenia Glukhov4, Florian Ryffel18, Hailey Houson, Hosein Mohimani1, Jenan J. Kharbush4, Yi Zeng1, Julia A. Vorholt18, Kenji L. Kurita30, Pep Charusanti1, Kerry L. McPhail31, Kristian Fog Nielsen14, Lisa Vuong, Maryam Elfeki19, Matthew F. Traxler32, Niclas Engene33, Nobuhiro Koyama2, Oliver B. Vining31, Ralph S. Baric24, Ricardo Pianta Rodrigues da Silva28, Samantha J. Mascuch4, Sophie Tomasi11, Stefan Jenkins9, Venkat R. Macherla, Thomas Hoffman, Vinayak Agarwal4, Philip G. Williams34, Jingqui Dai34, Ram P. Neupane34, Joshua R. Gurr34, Andrés M. C. Rodríguez28, Anne Lamsa1, Chen Zhang1, Kathleen Dorrestein2, Brendan M. Duggan2, Jehad Almaliti2, Pierre-Marie Allard35, Prasad Phapale, Louis-Félix Nothias36, Theodore Alexandrov, Marc Litaudon36, Jean-Luc Wolfender35, Jennifer E. Kyle37, Thomas O. Metz37, Tyler Peryea38, Dac-Trung Nguyen38, Danielle VanLeer38, Paul Shinn38, Ajit Jadhav38, Rolf Müller, Katrina M. Waters37, Wenyuan Shi15, Xueting Liu39, Lixin Zhang39, Rob Knight1, Paul R. Jensen4, Bernhard O. Palsson1, Kit Pogliano1, Roger G. Linington30, Marcelino Gutiérrez, Norberto Peporine Lopes28, William H. Gerwick2, William H. Gerwick4, Bradley S. Moore2, Bradley S. Moore4, Pieter C. Dorrestein2, Pieter C. Dorrestein4, Nuno Bandeira1, Nuno Bandeira2 
TL;DR: In GNPS, crowdsourced curation of freely available community-wide reference MS libraries will underpin improved annotations and data-driven social-networking should facilitate identification of spectra and foster collaborations.
Abstract: The potential of the diverse chemistries present in natural products (NP) for biotechnology and medicine remains untapped because NP databases are not searchable with raw data and the NP community has no way to share data other than in published papers. Although mass spectrometry (MS) techniques are well-suited to high-throughput characterization of NP, there is a pressing need for an infrastructure to enable sharing and curation of data. We present Global Natural Products Social Molecular Networking (GNPS; http://gnps.ucsd.edu), an open-access knowledge base for community-wide organization and sharing of raw, processed or identified tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. In GNPS, crowdsourced curation of freely available community-wide reference MS libraries will underpin improved annotations. Data-driven social-networking should facilitate identification of spectra and foster collaborations. We also introduce the concept of 'living data' through continuous reanalysis of deposited data.

2,365 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study presents an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) that integrates innovation diffusion theory, perceived risk and cost into the TAM to investigate what determines user mobile commerce (MC) acceptance.
Abstract: This study presents an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) that integrates innovation diffusion theory, perceived risk and cost into the TAM to investigate what determines user mobile commerce (MC) acceptance. The proposed model was empirically tested using data collected from a survey of MC consumers. The structural equation modeling technique was used to evaluate the causal model and confirmatory factor analysis was performed to examine the reliability and validity of the measurement model. Our findings indicated that all variables except perceived ease of use significantly affected users' behavioral intent. Among them, the compatibility had the most significant influence. Furthermore, a striking, and somewhat puzzling finding was the positive influence of perceived risk on behavioral intention to use. The implication of this work to both researchers and practitioners is discussed.

2,252 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Decentralized, distributed, and hierarchical control of grid-connected and islanded microgrids that mimic the behavior of the mains grid is reviewed.
Abstract: This paper presents a review of advanced control techniques for microgrids. This paper covers decentralized, distributed, and hierarchical control of grid-connected and islanded microgrids. At first, decentralized control techniques for microgrids are reviewed. Then, the recent developments in the stability analysis of decentralized controlled microgrids are discussed. Finally, hierarchical control for microgrids that mimic the behavior of the mains grid is reviewed.

1,702 citations


Authors

Showing all 17397 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Jun Lu135152699767
Wen-Hsiung Li10646161181
Soo-Jin Park86128237204
Chin Chung Tsai8340923043
Huan-Tsung Chang7640521476
Kin-Lu Wong7679926512
T.G. Nieh7336419464
Hsiao-Hwa Chen7152618728
Chien-Hong Cheng7048916456
Sie Chin Tjong6843018161
Peter Güntert6824221339
Branka Vucetic6673318303
Shi Jin6663316029
Feng-Chih Chang6539915503
Che-Ming Teng6451516402
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202338
2022130
20211,250
20201,288
20191,121
20181,086